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CANAL RECORD 



VOLUME 5 



UNIVERSITY 
OF FLORIDA 
LIBRARIES 




Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2010 with funding from 

University of Florida, George A. Smathers Libraries with support from Lyrasis and the Sloan Foundation 



http://www.archive.org/details/canalrecord5152isth 



CANAL 




RECORD 



PUBLISHED WEEKLY UNDER THE 
AUTHORITY AND SUPERVISION OF 
THE ISTHMIAN CANAL COMMISSION 



AUGUST 30, 1911, TO AUGUST 21, 1912 



VOLUME V 



WITH INDEX 



ANCON, CANAL ZONE 
ISTHMIAN CANAL COMMISSION 
1912, 



MOUNT HOPE. CANAL ZONE 

ISTHMIAN CANAL COMMISSION PRINTING OFFICE 

1912. 



INDEX 



Accidents, fatal, 198. 214. 295, 351, 3S3, 399, 409. 

Accounts, expenditure. 32. 147, 203. 

Advertising on government property. 35. 

Agriculture, report, 13. 

Air compressors, locks, 127, 149, 245. 

Air and water service, Culebra Cut, 91. 

American Medical Association, C. Z. research, 358. 

Amusements for employes, 157. 

Appropriation Committee, visit, 82, 90. 

Army, U. S., surcharge, 71. 

Atlantic Division — 

Chief Clerk, appointment, 39, 251. 
Engineer, acting, 88, 331. 
Superintendent of Construction, acting, 95. 
Automobile fire apparatus, 65, 165. 309. 

B 
Baggage contract let, 13. 
Band concerts. See each issue. 

Barges, tow around South America, 1S9, 309, 325, 341. 
Baseball — 

New Orleans club, 187. 

Schedule, 135, 186. 

Scores, 163, 171, 180. 187, 195. 211. 227, 235, 243, 

251, 259. 267. 275. 283. 
Transportation for teams, 86. 
Bills, itemized, 411. 
Blasting. Culebra Cut, 301. 318. 
Boiler — 

Inspection, 131, 152. 
Plugs, fusible, 155. 
Boundary marks. Penal Code, 411. 
Boy Scouts. 27, 106. 
Breakwater — 

Atlantic entrance. 1, 47. 133, 337, 401, 413. 

Cost statements, Part 2, Nos. 11. 24, 37. 50; also. 

Page 414. No. 52. 
Pacific entrance, 9, 73, 127, 337. 357. 
Recommendation of Board, 9. 
Reports, Chief Engineer, monthly, 28, 60, 98, 136. 

176, 215, 239, 271, 311. 343, 375. 415. 
Signal lights, 413. 
Bridge — 

Bascule, Monte Lirio, 190, 278. 
Cardenas River, damage by flood, 301. 
Culebra Cut, railroad, 357. 
Bubonic plague — 
Case. 67. 

Quarantine precautions, 71, 381. 
Building — 

Brazos Brook reservoir, 46. 
Sales, 64, 70. 77. 88, 89, 95, 146, 155, 205. 
School, Ancon, 46. 
Sites, permanent, 277, 359, 397, 409. 
Buoys, navigation aids, 347. 

C 

Car repairers needed, 226. 

Cargo handling, Canal terminals, 181, 280. 

Castings, steel, 196, 387. 

Cement — 

Ch^ck and delivery, 39. 

Cost, 17. 

Gun for applying, 237. 

Specifications, 342. 
Census — 

Canal Zone, 104, 159, 179, 185. 251. 384-5. 

Panama and Colon. 12. 
Central Division — 

Chagres district abolished, 420. 

Chiet Clerk, acting, 420. 

Engineer, acting, 420. 

Timekeeper, acting, 420. 
Chagres River — 

Discharge, yearly record, 143. 



Charges River — 

Pumping station. 149, 349. 
Stages. See each issue. 
Chairman and Chiel Engineer — 
Acting, 186, 196, 322. 

Reports, monthly. 2S. 60, 98, 136. 176, 215, 239, 
271. 311. 343, 375. 415. 
Chapels, hospital morgues, 213. 
Charcoal kiln closed, 301. 
Christmas, social events, 135. 
Church- 
Christmas celebration, 135. 
Protestant Episcopal Missions, 3. 
Roman Catholic Bishopric, 106, 407. 
Salvation Army Institute. 3, 94, 154. 
St. Luke's pipe organ, 154. 
Sunday School Association, convention. 94. 
Surcharge on material and labor, 251. 
Water and lighting service, 123. 
Wesleyan Methodist, 407. 
See also each issue. 
Circulars, official — 

Army, U. S., surcharge. 71. 
Atlantic Division — 

Chief Clerk, 39. 251. 
Engineer, acting, 88, 331. 
Superintendent of Construrtion, acting, 95. 
Bills, itemized. 41 1. 
Boiler- 
Inspection, 131. 
Plugs, fusible, 155. 
Boundary marks. Penal Code, 411. 
Castings, shipment. 196, 387. 
Cement, cneck and delivery. 39. 
Census, C^nal Zone. 179, 185. 251. 
Central Division — 

Chagres District abolished, 42U. 
Chief Clerk, acting. 420. 
Engineer, acting. 420. 
Timekeeper, acting, 420. 
Chairman and Chief Engineer, acting, 18*. 196. 

322. 
Church — 

Surcharge, material and labor. 251. 
Water and lighting 123. 
Civil Administration. Dept., acting head. 322. 
Civil Service rules, amendment. 203. 
Clubhouses, Superintendent, appointment, 55. 
Coal — 

Scoop, standard. 7. 
Selling rrices, 282. 
Waste in unloading. 7. 
Collector of Revenues, acting, 15. 
Commissary books tor cash, 322. 347. 
Construction and Engineering, Department — 
Chief Clerk, acting, 268. 
Chief Engineer, acting. 186, 196, 322. 
Court martial witnesses, 212. 
Debts of employes, 159. 
Depot Quartermaster, acting, 48. 
Disbursing Officer, acting. 15. 
Dynamite remaining in cars, 196. 
Election, Panama, 354, 363. 
Electric current, furnishing, 307. 
Electrical Superintendent, acting. 315. 
Empire shops transferred, 331. 
Equipment — 

Dismantling and remodeling, 196. 
Overhauling and repairs, 290. 
Rates between department, 307. 
Surplus. 322. 
Estimates for 1914. 403. 
Examiner of Accounts, acting, 315, 338. 
Exrencliture Accounts. 32, 147, 203. 
Expense, traveling, 363. 



Circulars, ofnchl — 

Force reduction, European laborers, 48, 71. 164 
Fortifications — 

Assistant Engineer in charge. 164. 
Secrecy, 251. 
Fourth of July, celebration. 322, 338. 354. 
Frdght, consignment, 95. 
Fuel, liquid, rules tor use, 1 15. 
Geographic Board, conventional signs. 380. 
Gages, clocks, etc., shipment, 315. 
Grass cutting, 32, 140. 
Health Officer, acting, 64. 251. 
Holidays. 64, 106, 140, 212,255, 315. 354.411. 
Hose for cleaning floors, 164. 
Hotel Washington, 307. 
Labor train, Gatun-Culebra. 71, 196. 
Laborers — 

Clearance and identification, 55. 
Force reduction. 48, 71, 164. 
Leave, vacation, 386. 
Lights, unauthorized, in quarters. 371. 
Liquor licenses, 290, 338. 
Locomotive — 

Bearings, hot. 282. 
Injectors, 307. 
Staybolts, broken, 155. 164. 
Tools and equipment, 55, 115, 164, 212. 
Lubricants — 

Containers, 7, 268. 
Inspector, 7. 
Record, 23. 

Standard, list and prices, 7, 186. 386. 
Marine Corps, surcharge. 15, 23. 
Material, second hand, transler, 251. 255. 
McCHntic-M.iishaU men, employment, 64. 
Mechanical Committee, meetings, 155. 
Mechanical Division — 

Chiet Clerk, acting. 131. 
Superintendent, acting. 71. 
Mechanics for temporary work, 219. 
Mileage books, Half rate. 92, 147. 179. 282. 
Oil— 

Fuel, sale and use, 115. 
Inspector, 7. 

Illuminating, standard. 7. 
Lubricating. See Lubricants. 
Organization statements. 395, 403. 
Oxygen and acetylene gas tanks. 395. 
Pacific Division Engineer, acting. 32. 170, 420. 
Pacific Mail S. S. express service. 243. 
Pay, annual rate table, hourly men, 354. 
Pay car schedule, 371. 403. 
Pay certificates, 77. 106. 
Police and Prisons, Chief, appointment. 380. 
Port Captains, appointment, 39. 
Purchasing Agent, acting, 48. 
Quarantine officers, appointment, 64, 251. 
Quarantine, plague cases, 71. 
Quartermaster, Chief, acting, 32, 299. 
Ratings and rates of pay. 23, 32.155, 170. 196,219. 

282. 
Reports, annual, fiscal year, 338. 
Reprimand and suspension, 155. 
Sanitary work requests, 32, 123, 140. 420. 
Sanitary Department — 

Chief Officer, acting, 123, 299. 
Assistant Chief Officer, acting. 140. 
Health Officer, acting, 64, 251. 
Quarantine Officer, acting, 64, 251. 
Scrap, French, removal and sale, 131, 147. 
Shipments, reduced rate request, 268. 
Shop — 

Employment, 55. 

Empire, transferred, 331. 

Expense percentage, 7. 123, 155, 299 ,403. 



INDEX 



Circulars, official — 

Sick leave and disability certificates, 331. 
Staybolts, locomotive, broken, 155, 164. 
Steamshovel cranemen, promotion, 420. 
Steel castings and patterns. 196. 387. 
Subsistence Department — 
Chief Clerk, acting. 64. 
Officer. 331. 
Surcharges, material and labor, 15, 23, 71, 7*1. 
Taboga Sanitarium, admission, 243. 
Telephone calls, 212, 354, 380. 
Termination of service forms, 140. 
Third Division, Chief Engineer's Office — 
Abolished, 186. 

Assistant Engineer, acting, 32, 140. 
Time lost, illness or injury, 354. 
Time vouchers, silver employes, 255. 
Train service, Saturday night, 203. 
Transfer time, pay, 315. 
Transportation — 

Half rate mileage, 92, 147, 179. 282. 
Labor train, 71. 
Passes, card, 155. 
Second class, 106. 

Trip tickets, 140, 196, 212, 255, 411. 
Traveling engineers, responsibility, 164. 
Tungsten lamp installation, 299. 
Vacation leave, rules and regulations, 386. 
Washington hotel, 307. 
Water- 
Examination, 354. 
Rates for steamships, 39. 
Restrictions on use, 140, 290. 
Wireless station, information from, 268. 
Witnesses — 

Court martial, 212. 
Fourth ot July disturbance, 371. 
Work, private, by employes, 77. 
Work reports, daily, 380. 
Work requests — 

Blanket orders, 307. 
Panama railroad, 106. 
Sanitary Department, 32, 123, 140. 
Civil Administration, Department, acting head, 322. 
Reports, Chief Engineer, monthly, 28, 60, 98, 136. 
176. 215, 239, 271, 311.343,375,415. 
Civil Procedure, amendment, 59. 
Civil Service — 

Admission card to examinations, 262. 
Examinations, 27. 38, 74, 105, 145, 151, 168. 191. 
202, 210, 226, 233, 247, 326. 362, 369, 406, 414, 
Mail addressed to Board, 271. 
Politics, participation, 168. 
Removal of employes, 251. 
Rules, 145, 203, 226. 
Clubhouses — 

Fifth anniversary, 327. 
Superintendent, appointment, 55. 
See each issue. 
Coal- 
Deposits in Canal Zone, 255. 
Scoop, standard, 7. 
Selling prices, 282. 
Waste in unloading, 7. 
Coast and Geodetic Survey, Pacific approaches, 255. 
Coffee, Panama, contract, 389. 
Cold storage plant — 

Ice cream freezers, 229. 
Shipping platform, 229. 
Storage space increased, 75. 
Collector of Revenues, acting, 15. 
Colon — 

Census. 12. 
Fill, hydraulic. 1. 
Immigration, 222. 301, 325, 367. 
Sewers, 5. 206. 

Water and sewer regulations, 5. 
Water works, plants, 393. 
Commissary books — 

Cost of issuing, 154. 
Sale for cash, 311, 347. 
Commissary Department, report, fiscal year, 75. 
Commissioner, Special, appointment, 43. 
Concrete — 

Construction, lock walls — 

Gatun. 49, 97. 109. 117, 229. 293, 321, 333, 
302. 



Concrete — 

Construction, lock walls — 

Miraflores, 9, 33, 57, 109, 141, 205. 213, 269, 

293, 294. 
Pedro Miguel, 9, 57, 89, 109, 113, 165, 173, 

290, 293. 
Spillways. See totals. 
Cost, 17, 25, Part 2, Nos. 11, 24, 37,50. 
Estimate, Pacific locks, 277. 
Forms for sale, 289. 
Mixers and handling equipment — 
Gatun, 1, 197, 237. 245, 285,389. 
Miraflores, 73. 109, 117, 158, 189, 309, 399. 
Pedro Miguel. 158, 189. 237. 
Three million mark, 109. 
Totals — 

Monthly, 20, 52, 84, 128, 160, 197, 200, 232, 

264, 296, 336. 368, 408. 
Weekly. See each issue. 
Two years' record. 1, 9. 
Congress — 

Bills, tolls and operation of Canal, 141. 
Committees, visit, 34, 66, 82. 90, 94. 134. 
Petitions of employes, 320. 
Construction and Engineering Department — 
Chief Clerk, acting. 268. 
Chief Engineer, acting, 186, 196, 322. 
Third Division, office abolished, 186. 
Consuls, British, changes, 183. 
Convict labor, housing, 33. 
Corozal dredge, launching and voyage, 25, 89, 141, 

165,245, 257, 271, 341. 
Cost statements, Part 2, Nos. 11,24, 37. 50; a!so. Page 

414. No. 52. 
Court martial witnesses, 212. 
Cranemen, steamshovel, promotion, 420. 
Cranes tor terminal docks, 54, 301, 381. 
Cruces trail, highway, 191. 
Culebra Cut — 

Accident fatal, 399. 
Air and water service, 91. 
Bridge, railroad, 357. 
Cross section and profile, 83, 153. 
Drainage. 157, 229. 261. 357. 405, 413. 
Drilling and blasting, 301, 318. 
Excavation. See Excavation. 
French dump, removal, 333. 
Heated areas, report ol geologist, 225, 373. 
Incline for hauling out spoil, 50, 125. 
Pumps, portable, 117. 

Slides, 21, 125, 184, 197, 205, 333 t 357, 373. 
Culebra Island, water supply. 25. 



Dairy farm, Ancon Hospital, 349. 
Dams — 

Cost statements. Part 2, Nos. 11, 24, 37, 50. 

Emergency, locks, 141, 181. 221. 

Fill placed, monthly, 20.52, 84,128, 160, 189. 200. 

205, 232, 253, 264, 296, 336, 368, 408. 
Gatun — 

Borrow pits. SI. 109, 189, 205, 237, 253. 269 

295, 317, 382, 409. 
Fill 173, 189,205, 253, 277,297,317,333. 
Switchback for spoil trains, 81. 
Miraflores, hydraulic fill, 149, 173, 297. 
Pedro Miguel — 

Fill, 112, 181, 285, 297, 350. 
Plan and cross section, 112. 
Report. Chief Engineer's, monthly, 28, 60, 98, 136, 

176, 215, 239, 271, 311, 343, 375, 415. 
Spillway. See Spillway. 
Dancing, a popular amusement, 335. 
Debts of employes, 159. 
Dennis, Mrs. L. R. relief fund, 13, 38. 
Depot Quartermaster, acting, 48. 
Diablo lighting system, 81. 
Diet for the tropics, 67. 
Directory, Canal officials, 8. 340. 
Disbursing Officer, acting. 15. 
Distillation Tax, 327. 
Distillery lease, Antonio Andrade, 165. 
Docks — 

Atlantic terminal, 89, 133. 231, 285, 298, 338. 401. 

Cargo handling, 181, 280. 

Dry, plans. 111. 

Dynamite at Mindi, 17,87, 270,309. 



Docks — 

Pacific terminal — 
Collapse, 413. 
Cranes, 54, 301, 381. 
Excavation, 317, 341. 405. 409. 
Lumber, 21. 53. 117, 144, 189, 298, 373. 
Drainage — 

Culebra Cut, 157. 229, 261. 357, 405, 413. 
Mindi River, 133. 
Sumps, lock, 208. 
Dredge — 
Corozal, 

Accident, 341. 

Launching and voyage. 25, 89, 141, 165, 245 
257,271. 
Culebra, seagoing suction, 149. 
Excavation — 

Atlantic entrance, 1, 47, 65, 117. 149. 

Cost statements, Part 2, Nos. 11, 24, 37, 50. 

Pacific entrance, 41. 51. 65. 73, 86, 165, 397, 

413. 
Totals. See Excavation. 

See Reports. Chief Engineer, monthly, 28, 60, 
98. 136, 176, 215, 239. 271. 311, 343, 375, 
415. 
Ladder No. 6, to be destroyed. 43. 
Pipeline transfer across Isthmus. 381. 
Spud for No. 83, 97. 
Teeth for buckets, 119. 
Repairs. I, 47, 51, 65, 86, 117. 149, 165. 
Drilling. Culebra Cut, 301. 318. 
Drowning, J. D. Kemp, 319. 
Dry dock plans. 111. 
Dumps — 

French, Culebra Cut. removal, 333. 
Material disposed, 51. 

Unloader records, monthly, 21, 51, 90. 129, 166, 
195, 233, 263, 295, 326. 409. 
Dynamite — 

Dock at Mindi. 17, 87. 270, 309. 
Estimate for fiscal year. 290, 298. 
Explosion, fatal, 214. 
Remaining in cars, 196. 



Earthquake shock, 277. 

Eight hour law, 367. 

Eight years of Canal work, summary, 297. 

Elections, Panama, 354, 363. 

Electric — 

Current for individuals and companies, 307. 

Shock, first aid, 143. 

Power plants — 
Balboa. 81. 

Gatun spillway, 5, 119,297,360-1, 413; Part 2. 
Nos. 1 1 , 50. 

Transformer equipment, locks, 265, 389. 

Street railway, 305, 409. 
Electrical engineers, visit, 93, 143, 162, 182. 
Electrical Superintendent, acting, 315. 
Equipment — 

Dismantling and remodeling, 196. 

Inventory, 350. 

Overhauling and repairs, 290. 

Rates for use, 307. 

Surplus, 322. 
Estates, administration. 209. 
Estimates — 

Concrete, 277. 

Dynamite. 290. 298. 

Excavation, 21, -105. 

Fiscal year 1914. 403. 
Examinations — 

Civil Service. See Civil Service. 

Commission in Volunteer Force, 86. 

Local Inspectors. See Local Inspectors. 

Rodman and levelman. 54, 59. 175, 280, 374. 
Examiner of Accounts, acting, 315, 338. 
Excavation — 

Amount remaining, monthly, 20, 52, 84, 128, 160, 
200, 232, 264, 296. 336, 368, 408. 

Borrow pits, Gatun dam, 81, 109, 189, 205, 237, 
253, 269, 295, 382. 409. 

Contract, 309. 

Cost, fiscal year, 25. 

Cost statements, Part 2, Nos. 11, 24, 37, 50. 

Culebra Cut — 

Cross section and profile, 83, 153, 373. 



INDjEX 



Excavation — 

Culebra Cut- 
Records — 

Monthly, 9, 41, 373. 
Daily, 25, 34, 221, 245, 269. 
Dredges. See Dredges. 
Eight years of Canal work, summary, 297. 
Estimate increase, 21, 405. 
Gatun lake anchorage basin, 149, 181,248. 
Hydraulic, Pacific Division, 26, 65. 81 r 97, 301 . 334. 
Locks. See Locks. 
Mindi, 1,41,65, 157,245. 
Panama railroad relocation. 12,43,51,91, 129, 159, 

199, 231, 328. 
Pedro Miguel, history, 353. 
San Pablo and Tabernilla, 51. 117. 149. 
Steamshovel records — 

Monthly, 12, 51, 91, 129, 159, 199, 231, 263, 

295, 335, 383. 398. 
Daily, 25, 34, 91. 221, 229, 237, 245. 261, 269 
293, 295,349,389. 
Totals — 

Monthly. 17, 49, 81, 125, 157. 197, 229, 261, 

293, 333,365,405. 
Monthly since American occupation, 20, 52, 
84, 128, 160, 200. 232, 264, 296, 336. 368, 
408. 
See Reports, Chief Engineer, monthly, 28, 60, 98, 
136, 176, 215, 239, 271, 311, 343, 375, 415. 
Executive Orders — 

Advertising on U. S. property, 35. 

Cement specifications, 342. 

Civil Procedure, amendment to Code, 59. 

Distillation tax, 327. 

Eight hour law, 367. 

Employment of Alumni of Mexican School, 114. 

Estate, administration, 209. 

Firearms, permits to carry, 95. 

Law of the Road, 239. 

Medical practice, license required, 83, 154. 

Petitions of employes to Congress, 320. 

Postal savings bank, 25, 35. 

Purchase of supplies from soldiers or sailors, 114. 

Railway equipment, removing of packing from 

journal boxes, 43. 
Sanitary rules and regulations, amendment, 83. 
Special Commissioner, appointment 43. 
Speed laws for vehicles, 239. 
Supreme Court Justice, appointment. 54. 
Trespassing, 295. 
Expenditures — 

Accounts, 32, 147, 203. 

Classified, monthly, 39, 69. 96, 147, 168. 201, 247, 

282. 307, 353,386, 411. 
Construction. See Cost Statements. 
Expense, traveling, 363. 
Explosions, fatal, 198, 214. 



Fakes, historic, 115. 

Fender chains and machines, locks, 45, 126, 1 73. 

Fenders on lock walls, 53, 127. 

Filtration plants, 157, 169, 393. 

Fire apparatus, automobile, 65, 165, 309. 

Firearms, permits to carry, 95. 

Fires — 

Empire plantation, 246. 

Steamshovel damaged. 277. 
First-aid packets and booklets. 181, 288. 
Flamenco Island — 

Graves transferred, 4. 

Fortifications. See Fortifications. 
Fluviograpn stations, change, 173. 
Folding machine, printing plant, 317. 
Fortifications — 

Assistant Engineer in charge, 164. 

Culebra Island water supply, 25. 

Dock for material at Mindi, 17, 87, 270, 309. 

Flamenco Island. 4, 36, 73. 

Names of forts, 169. 

Perico Island, trespassing, 414. 

Secrecy regarding, 251. 

Toro Point, 73,87. 
Fortune Island laborers repatriated, 40L 
Fossils, specimens collected, 22, 97. 
Fourth of July celebration. 305, 311.322, 330, 335,338, 

352, 354, 370. 
Freight — 

Consignments to individuals and companies, 95. 



Freight- 
Panama route, 44, 152, 213. 
Rates, proposed increase, 213 

Fuel, liquid, rules for use. 115. 



Gasoline, issue and use, 7, 115. 

Gates. Locks. See Locks. Spillway. 5« Spillway. 

Gatun Lake — 

Anchorage basin. 149, 181,248. 

Buildings, removal and sale, 89, 205. 

Control of area covered, 317. 

Rise. 293. 

Timber, 277, 282. 

Villages to be abandoned, 68, 120. 
Geographic Board, conventional signs, 380. 
Geologist reports — 

Coal deposits, 255. 

Heated areas. Culebra Cut. 225. 
Golden Green, sanitation, 46. 
Grass cutting, 140. 
Gravel pits. 153. 285. 
Graving dock, plans. 111. 



Hamburg-American S. S. cruises, 168. 

Hammond. Mrs. E. D.. benefit, 38, 94, 119. 

Health Officer, acting. 64, 251. 

Health work and lectures, 19, 86, 166,223, 289, 295, 

359. 
Heat records, 230, 281. 

See also Weather reports. 
Highways — 

Convict labor, housing, 33. 

Cruces trail, 191. 

Distances. 6. 

Empire-Chorrera, 33. 

Law of the road, 239. 

Sabanas Road, resurfacing. 238. 
Holidays, 64, 106, 140. 212, 255, 315. 354. 411. 
Hose tor cleaning floors, 164. 
Hospital — 

Dairy farm. 349. 

Laundry charges, 309. 

Morgue, chapels, 213. 

Trees and plants, 394. 
Hotel- 
Balboa abandoned, 374. 

Tivoli. improvements, 298, 317, 399. 

Washington. 3, 69, 93, 246. 
Hydroelectric plant, Gatun, 5, 119. 297, 360-1, Part 2, 
No. 11. 50. 

I 

Illinois Manufacturers Assn., visit of members, 126. 
Immigration, Panama. 222, 301, 325, 367. 
Impounding of stray animals, 19. 
Inca Society, dinner, 298. 
Incorporation in the Canal Zone, 389. 
Infantry regiment, Camp Otis, 9, 46, 86, 93. 
Isthmian Telephone Company contract, 2. 



Johnson, Prof. Emory R., Special Commissioner, 43. 

L 
Labor — 

Clearance and identification, 55. 

Force and quarters, monthly report, 36, 67, 111, 
127, 167. 199,231, 281,320,359,391.407. 

Force reduction, 48, 71, 159, 164. 

Fortune Island, repatriated. 401. 

Recruiting, 27. 

Surplus, 57. 

United Fruit Company, to Guatemala, 374. 

See Reports. Chief Engineer, monthly, 28, 60, 98, 
136, 176, 215, 239, 271, 311, 343, 375, 415. 
Labor Train — 

Atlantic Division, 71, 96. 

Pacific Division, 247, 362, 367. 
Lake— 

Gatun. See Gatun Lake. 

Miraflores, channel, 197. 
Land — ■ 

Agricultural possibilities, 13. 

Survey, 18. 

Terminal, leasing, 365. 
Launch — 

"Cathandre" destroyed by fire. 335. 

Inspection, 327. 



Laundry. Ancon Hospital, changes, 309. 
Lawn tennis tournaments, 167, 194, 288, 343. 
Law — 

Eight-hour. 367. 
Highway, 239. 

Steamboat inspection, 86, 131, 152, 310. 
See also Executive Orders. 
See also Ordinances. 
Letters, misdirected. See each issue. 
Lighters for sale, 277, 317. 
Lighthouses — 

Installation, map and plans, 41, 101-4. 
Sun valves, test, 125. 

See Reports, Chief Engineer, monthly, 28, 60, 98, 
136, 176, 215, 239, 271, 311, 343. 375. 415. 
Lighting, villages, change, 81. 
Lights, unauthorized, in quarters, 371. 
Liquor licenses, 290. 338. 
Local I nspectors — 

Examinations, pilots. See Pilots. 
Fire and boat drill supervision, 325. 
Member, acting, appointment, 403. 
Steamship inspection, 86. 131, 152, 310. 
Locks — 

Concrete. See Concrete. 

Cost statements. Part 2, Nos. 11, 24. 37, 50. 

Cover plates, machine recesses, 33, 201. 

Cranes for machine erection, 133. 

Dams, emergency, 373. 

Electric transformer equipment, 265, 389. 

Fenders — 

Chain and operating machines, 45, 126, 173, 

192. 208, 297. 
Wall, 53, 127. 297. 
Gate- 
Installation, 33, 49, 161, 297, 301. 
Paint, 365. 

Reamers, electric, 189. 
Sealing device, 76, 357. 
Test, 49, 301. 
Timber for sills, 405 

Valves, 33. 65, 76.92, 117, 145, 192, 297. 
See Reports. Chief Engineer, monthly, 28, 60. 
98, 136, 176. 215, 239, 271, 311. 343, 375, 
415. 
Gatun — 

Air compressors, 245. 
Backfill. 197, 237, 373. 
Bridge, construction, 125, 269. 
Cofferdam, 91. 181. 
Concrete. See Concrete. 
Dam, emergency, 141, 373. 
Excavation, 181, 389. 

Totals. See Excavation. 
Gates and machinery, 49, 89, 109. 161. 173, 
221, 269, 293, 301, 317, 333, 365, 397, 409. 
Slides, 41. 

Trestle for concrete trains, 237. 
Towing tracks. 149, 197 224, 389. 
Valves and machines. 76, 92. 
Walls; — 

Approach, plans, 321. 
Construction, 49, 97, 109, 117. 229, 321, 
333, 392. 
Machinery, operating — 
Control system, 192. 

Installation, 2, 33. 77, 145. 161, 192, 201. 301. 
Model. 233. 405. 
Storage room, 145. 

See reports. Chief Engineer, monthly, 28, 60, 
98,136, 176,215,239, 271, 311, 343. 375, 
415. 
Miraflores— 

Air compressors, 127, 149. 

Backfill, 117. 

Bridge for towing tracks, 189. 

Caissons for guide walls, 57, 109, 141, 213. 

Concrete. See Concrete. 

Excavation, 26, 33, 65, 73, 81, 97. 

Totals. See Excavation. 
Gates and machines, 221. 
Spur tracks, 253. 
Trestle for concrete trains, 205. 
Walls, construction, 9. 33, 57, 109. 141, 205. 
213, 269, 293, 294. 
* Model, 233, 405. 

Motors, valve operation. 41, 65, 208, 253, 
Pedro Miguel — - 

Air compressors, 245. 



INDEX 



Locks — 

Pedro Miguel — 

Backfill 57, 81. 
Concrete. See Concrete. 
Cranes, removal, 158, 189- 
Dam, emergency, 141, 181, 221. 
Drainage, 157. 229. 
Excavation, 89. 141. 
Totals. See Excavation. 
Gate erection, 57. 81, 89, 109. 221, 269. 409 
Spur tracks. 253. 

Towing tracks. 189, 197. 224, 389. 
Trestle. 165, 310. 
Walls- 
Construction, 9, 57, 89, 109, 113, 165 

173, 290, 293. 397. 
Guide, arches connecting, 113. 
Pumping plants, 397. 
Pumps and motors, 208. 
Snubbing posts, 51. 
Summary of work, 297. 
Towing locomotives and tracks, 21, 33, 37, 65, 141, 

149, 186, 189. 197, 224, 389. 
Valves and machines, 33, 65, 76, 92, 117. 145, 192. 

297. 
See reports. Chief Engineer, monthly, 28, 60, 98. 
136. 176, 215, 239, 271, 311. 343. 375. 415. 
Locomotive — 

Bearings, hot, 282. 
Flues, replacing, 222. 
Injectors, 307. 
Staybolts, broken, 155, 164. 
Tools and equipment, 55, 1 15, 164, 212. 
Towing, locks. See Locks. 
Lodge notices. See each issue. 
Lubricants — 

Containers, 7, 268. 
Inspector, 7. 
Record, 23. 

Standard, list, 7, 14, 186, 386. 
Lumber — 

Cocobolo, transshipment, 67. 
Orders placed. 87. 

M 

Mail service, ocean, proposals, 381. 
Market regulations, 11. 
Marine Corps, surcharge, 15, 23. 
Material, second hand, transfer, 251, 255. 
McClintic-Marshall men. employment, 64. 
Mechanical Committee, meeting, 155. 
Mechanical Division — 

Boiler inspection. 131. 

Empire shops transferred, 331. 

Scale inspection, 213. 

Superintendent, acting., 71. 
Mechanics for temporary work, 219. 
Medals, Canal — 

Distribution, 13. 

List, 249, 256, 263. 279, 287, 304, 319, 351. 

Unclaimed, 191. 
Medical practice, license required, 83, 154. 
Memorial Day services, 315, 320. 
Mileage books, half rate, 92, 147, 179, 282. 
Miraflores Lake, channel, 197. 
Model, lock machinery, 233, 405. 
Money orders, monthly report, 3, 36, 70, 97, 143, 17 

185, 214, 248, 288, 337, 358. 
Money order business with Mexico, 280. 
Morgues, hospital chapel, 213. 
Motor cars, levers for brakes, 373, 393. 
Motor vehicles, licensing and regulation. 319. 
Motors, lock, 41, 65. 208, 253. 
Murder of a soldier, 383. 

N 

National Bankers Association, visit, 12. 
Navigation aids. Notices to mariners, 140, 142, 170, 
196, 276, 303, 319, 349, 366. 414. 
See also Lighthouses. 



Obituary — 

Alton, Stephen II., 31. 
Benion, H. G., 122. 
Bolton, Herman T., 67. 
Boyd, Mrs. O. S., 46. 
Brenner, Joseph, 343. 
Cecil, Mrs. H. E., 122. 



Obituary — 

Clayton, W. E.. 46. 

Caldwell, Geo. Alired, 5. 

Coe, Henry P., 36. 

Cole. S. C. 223. 

Colip, R. H.. 210. 

DesLondes. Oscar L., 130. 

Duvall, Fredericka, 409. 

Ferguson, Howard. 214. 

Fondren, Carl, 337. 

Golden. John P., 295. 

Grier, Robert, 36. 

Grigsby, Frank C. 170. 

Hagen. John, 258. 

Higley. Charles, 303. 

Horham, James Luther. 170. 

Jefferics, Jinkney, 130. 

Kemp, J. D.. 319. 

Kennison, Nelson, 281. 

Kornfield, Karl, 250- 

Locks, Charles F.. 400 

Longtin. F. R., 223. 

McEvers, Edward, 122. 

Morrise, Harry, 379. 

Newcomb, Geo. E., 144. 

Painter. Joseph Henry, 40**. 

Payne, Roy E.. 35. 

Powers, Isaac. 343. 

Proctor. Alman R.. 379. 

Reynolds, Thomas Coarts, 343. 

Riley, James J., 27. 

Riley, Thomas, 379. 

Roe, Mrs. Martin. 311. 

Sadler, Joseph V., 243. 

Schwartz, Henry, 351. 

Strock, James Ransom, 409. 

Thayer, John P., 59. 

Treadwell. Edward Frederick, 135. 

Turrell, Joseph, 105. 

Vanderschmidt, Henry, 243. 

West, C. B., 59. 
Offices, permanent, 277, 359, 397, 409. 
Officials, Canal directory, 8, 340. 
Oil— 

Fuel- 
Deliveries and pipe-line changes, 43. 
Inspector, 7. 
Sale and use, rules, 115. 

Illuminating, standard. 7, 386. 

Lubricating. See Lubricants. 

Ordinances — 

Impounding of stray animals. 19. 

Market regulations, 11. 

Motor vehicles, licensing and regulation, 319. 

Quarantine inspection at night. 11. 

Taxes and licenses, amendment, 11, 319. 
Organization statements, 395, 403. 
Oxygen and acetylene gas tanks, 395. 



Pacific Division, Engineer, Actg., 32, 170, 420. 
Pacific Mail steamship service, 243. 
Panama — 

Census, 12. 

Elections, 354, 363. 

Immigration, 222, 301, 325, 367. 

Sewers, 5, 58, 93, 206. 

Street improvements, 58, 93. 

Tramway, electric, 305, 409. 

Water supply, 5, 33. 58, 157, 253. 

Wyse. Lieut. L. N. B., bust unveiled, 407. 
Panama Railroad — 

Baggage contract, 13. 

Car Dept., Gen'l Foreman, acting, 291. 

Chiet Engineer, acting, 331. 

Coal, selling prices, 282. 
' Commissary. See Commissary. 

Docks. See Docks. 

Freight tonnage and rates, 44, 152, 213. 

Gravel pits, 153, 285. 

Master of Transportation, acting, 371. 

Mechanical Dept., Gen'l. Foreman, acting, 354,371 

Mileage books, 92, 147, 179, 282. 

Parlor car service, 198. 

Passenger business, 44. 

Passes, card, 155. 

Receiving and Forwarding Agent, acting, 315. 



Panama Railroad — 

Relocation — 

Bridge, bascule, at Monte Lirio. 190, 278. 
Embankments, riprapping. 373. 
Engineer in Charge, acting. 331. 
Excavation records. 12, 43. 51, 91. 129, 159, 

199, 231, 328. 
Gold Hill section completed, 253, 328. 
Gorgona-Gatun section opened, 181. 
Ties, hardwood. 141. 
Water station at Frijoles, 295. 
See Reports, Chief Engineer, monthly, 28, 60, 
98, 136, 176, 215, 239, 271, 311, 343, 375, 
415. 

Removal of old line, 261. 

Roadmaster, appointment, 411. 

Sale of unclaimed shipments, 131, 146, 155. 

Second-class transportation, 106. 

Shuttle train, Colon-Gatun, 230. 

Sightseeing train, 190, 207, 219, 317, 331. 

Special trains on election day, 358. 

Station at Panama. 42, 110, 329. 

Steamships. See Steamships. 

Superintendent, General, acting, 380. 

Telephone. See Telephone. 

Time Tables. 79, 195, 206. 211, 317. 338. 352. 

Trip tickets. 140, 196. 212. 255. 411, 

Tugs. See Tugs. 

Work requests. 106. 
Parcels post, 349. 

Pay. rate table, nourly employes, 354. 
Pay car schedule, 371, 403. 
Pay certificates, 77. 106. 
Penitentiary — ■ 

Farm, survey, 1". 

Relocation, 309. 
Petitions of employes to Congress. 320. 
Piling- 
Concrete, cost statement. Part 2, Nos. 11, 24. 

Orders placed, 87. 
Pilot examinations, 14, 27, 43, 59, 78. 92, 112, 129, 145. 

175, 194, 210, 226. 243, 255. 271, 303. 337. 350. 

383, 401, 444. 
Plague, quarantine precautions. 54, 71. 
Pneumatic hammer, 400. 
Police, pistol tournaments, 46, 367. 
Police and Prisons, Chief, appointment, 380. 
Port Captains, appointment, 39. 
Postage stamps in books. 93. 
Postal clerks, convention, 3. 
Postal sales, monthly. 3, 36, 70, 97, 143, 175, 185. 214. 

248, 288, 337, 358, 382. 
Postal savings bank — 

Authorization and rules, 25, 35. 105, 167, 182. 

Reports, monthly, 238, 288, 337, 361, 382. 
Power plant — 

Balboa, 81. 

Gatun. 5, 119, 297, 360-1, 413, Part 2, Nos. 11, 50. 
Printing plant, folding machine, 317. 
Public Health Association, invitation to, 383. 
Pumping plants- 
Locks, 397. 

Reservoir, 33, 149, 349, 393. 
Pumps and motors, locks, 208. 
Purchasing Agent, acting, 48. 

Q 

Quarantine — 

Cholera precaution, 54. 

Inspection at night, 11. 

Officer, acting 64,251. 

Plague cases. 67. 71, 381. 
Quartermasters Department — 

Chief, acting. 32, 299. 

Depot Quartermaster, acting 48. 

Purchasing Agent, acting, 48. 
Quarters — 

Bachelor, at Corozal, 401. 

Congestion, Pacific end, 406. 

Family, application list, 38, 63, 96, 127, 170, 203, 
235, 283, 323, 354, 383, 410. 

Permanent, report of Committee, 359. 

Report, monthly, 36, 67, 111, 127, 167, 199, 231, 
281, 320, 359, 391. 407. 

Tenth Infantry at Las Cascadas, 86, 93. 

See Reports, Chief Engineer, monthly, 28, 60, 98. 
136, 176, 215, 239, 271, 311, 343, 375, 415. 



INDEX 



Rainfall — 

Accumulated for the year, 143. 

Dry season, 299. 

Monthly, three years, 23,55,88. 129. 159. 186, 191. 
227. 290, 299. 339, 371, 402. 

Records broken, 117,301. 

Stations, change. 173. 

Weekly. See each issue. 

See also Weather reports. 
Range towers. See Lighthouses. 

Ratings and rates of pay, 23. 32. 155,170, 196.219.282. 
Reamers for riveting lock gates, 189. 
Red Cross- 
Election of officers. 130. 

Endowment fund, 86. 

Financial statements, monthly. 22. 70. 96. 130. 
168, 215, 267, 327. 361. 383. 

Reception to Miss Mabel T. Boardman, 150. 162, 
168. 

Seals, 105. 
Report, Commission, annual, 54, 
Reprimand and suspension of employes, 155. 
Reservoirs — 

Agua Clara, nitration plant, 157. 169. 

Cocoli pumping station, 33. 

Comacho system, 149. 

Mt. Hope filtration plant, 393. 

Mt. Zion system. 261. 

Rio Grande main. 33, 157, 253. 

Water shortage and restrictions, 140, 149.290,303. 
366. 

See also Water. 
Revenues, monthly. 3, 36, 70, 143, 185, 214. 248, 288, 

337. 358. 382. 
Rifle clubs and matches. 21. 112, 170, 266,337,409. 
Riveters, power, for shops, 221. 
Roads. See Highways. 
Rock- 
Cost statements. Part 2, Nos, 11, 24, 37, 50. 

Concrete cost, 17. 25. 

Crushers — 

Porto Bello plant closed, 289. 
Statements, weekly. See each issue. 

Culebra Cut, for dams, 253. 
Rolling stock, conversion to standard gage. 114. 
Royal Mail Steam Packet Co.. rate. 119. 



Sabanas road, resurfacing, 238. 
Salvation Army Institute, 3, 94, 154. 
Sand — 

Cost statements, 17, Part 2, Nos. 11, 24. 37, 50. 

Nombre de Dios service discontinued. 89. 

Report, monthly. Pacific Division. 26, 51, 96, 129, 
161. 185. 193. 233, 280, 303. 326, 369, 399. 

See also Reports, Chiet Engineer, monthly. 28. 60, 
98. 136. 176, 215, 239. 271, 311, 343, 375, 415. 
Sanitary drinking cup, 390. 
Sanitation. Department of — 

Assistant Chief , acting, 140. 

Chief Sanitary officer, acting. 123, 299. 

Health Officer, acting, 64. 251. 

Quarantine Officer, acting, 64. 251. 

Reports. Chief Engineer, monthly, 28, 60, 98, 136, 
176, 215. 239, 271. 311, 343. 375. 415. 
Sanitary rules and regulations, amendment, 83. 
Sanitary work requests. 32, 123. 140. 42a 
Scales, inspection. 213. 
Schools — 

Attendance, 54. 167. 

Brake schedule, 35. 

Close. 337, 

High. 250. 325, 343, 351. 357. 

Holidays. 130. 234. 

Medical examination, 369. 

Opening, 19. 

Summary of year's work, 400. 

Teachers, assignment and qualifications, 35, 226. 
Scrap. French removal and sale, 25, 131, 133, 147, 

269. 392. 
Settlements, permanent. 277, 359. 
Sewers. Panama and Colon, 5, 58, 93, 206. 
Shipments, reduced rate requests, 268. 
Shops — 

Empire, transferred, 331, 357. 

Employment on Isthmus, 55. 

Expense percentage, 7, 123, 155. 203, 299, 403. 

Riveters, power, 221. 

Steel casting plant, 196. 248. 



Sick leave and disability certificates, 331. 
Sightseeing train, 190. 207, 219. 317. 331. 
Six year men, Society of the Chagres, 11, 31, 54, 142, 

174, 194. 
Slides — 

Culebra Cut. 21, 125. 184. 197, 205, 333, 357, 373. 
Excavation increase, 21, 405. 
Gatun Locks, 41. 
Steamshovel wrecked, 334. 
Snubbing posts, tocks. 51. 

Society of the Chagres. 11, 31. 54. 142, 174. 194. 
Special Commissioner, appointment, 43. 
Sreed laws, highway, 239. 
Spillways — 

Concrete. See Concrete. 
Cost statements. Part 2. Nos.ll. 24, 37. 50. 
Gates and machines. 68-9. 325, 381 
Gatun — 

Baffle piers, 254. 

Closing. 221. 293, 397. 

Cofferdam, 133. 173. 

Gates and caisson j. assembling. 325. 

Ogee construction. 133, 173, 221. 

Operating tunnel, 97. 

Power plant. 5. ,119, 297, 360-1. 413. Part 2, 

Nos. 11,50. 
Sluice gates. 338. 341. 349. 
Trestle, construction, 365. 
Work program. 57. 
See Reports. Chief Engineer, monthly, 28, 60. 98, 
136, 176. 215. 239. 271. 311, 343, 375. 415. 
St. Louis Business Men's League, visit. 183. 
Stationery and office supplies, sale, 170. 
Steamship — 

Arrivals and departures. See each issue- 
Cruises for tourists. 168. 
Fire and boat drill. 325. 
Inspection, 86, 131. 152. 310. 
Munson Line, aground, 118. 
Pacific Mail — - 
Service, 243. 

Sunk by collapsing wharf, 413. 
Panama Railroad — 
Accidents. 12. 
Chartered, 9. 

Repairs to the AUianca, 19. 
Tourist rate, 82. 
Royal Mail Steam Packet Co., rate, 119. 
Sailings. See each issue. 
United Fruit Company — 

Coastwise service 13. 289. 
Cruises for tourists, 168. 
European service, 320. 337. 
Increase in service, 168. 
Stateroom reservations. 255. 
Water supply and rates, 39, 302. 
Steamshovel — 

Excavation. See Excavation. 
Cranemen, promotion. 420. 
Damaged by fire, 277. 
Dipper trips. 85. 
Efficiency statement, 410. 
Rail clamps. 73. 149. 
Records. See Excavation. 
Wrecked by slide, 334. 
Steel casting plant. 196. 248. 

Storehouse for obsolete and surplus supplies. 112. 
Storms, local, 4, 302. 
Subsistence Department — 
Chief Clerk, acting, 64. 
Chief Officer, acting, 331. 

See Reports, Chief Engineer, monthly, 28, 60, 98, 
136, 176. 215. 239. 271, 311, 343, 375, 415. 
Suicides. 78. 175, 303. 315. 
Sun valves, test in range towers. 125. 
Supplies — 

Inventory, 350. 
Sale. 245. 
Storehouse. 112. 
Weekly receipt. See each issue. 
Supreme Court Justice, appointments, 46, 54. 
Surcharge, material and labor, 15, 23, 71, 251. 
Survey — 

Canal Zona land, 18. 
Pacific approaches to Canal, 255. 
Penitentiary farm. 18. 
Swamp reclamation, 97,_149. 



Taboga Sanitarium — 

Admission, 243. 

Launch service, 403. 
Taxes and licenses, amendments, 11, 319. 
Telephone — 

Calls, 212. 354, 380. 

Directory changes, 363, 383.412. 

Isthmian Company, contract, 2. 

Superintendent, appointment, 299. 
Tenth Infantry. 9. 46, 86, 93. 
Terminals. See Docks. 
Termination ot service forms, 140. 
Third Division, Chief Engineer's office — 

Assistant Engineer, Actg, 32, 140. 

Abolished, 186. 
Tidal data for Pacific entrance, 89. 
Tide tables. See each issue. 
Ties, hardwood, railroad relocation, 141. 
Timber— 

Gatun Lake, 277, 282. 

Lock gate sills, 405. 
Time lost, illness or injury, 354. 
Time vouchers, silver employes, 255. 
Tivoli Club, annual meeting. 13. 
Tivoli hotel, improvements, 298, 317, 399. 
Tolls, Bill introduced in Congress. 141. 
Tourists in transit. 222, 301. 325, 367. 
Towing locomotives and tracks, locks, 21, 33, 37, 65, 

141. 149. 186. 189. 197. 224. 389. 
Track shifter operations, monthly. 358. 
Trails — 

Contract for clearing, 135, 164, 172. 

Cruces. highway, 191. 
Tramway construction, Panama. 305. 409. 
Transformer equipment, locks, 265. 
Transportation — 

Labor train, 71. 

Mileage, half rate, 92. 147, 179. 282. 

Passes, card, 155. 

Second-class, 106. 

Trip tickets, official. 140, 196. 212, 255. 
Traveling engineers, responsibility, 164. 
Trees, hospital gardens, 394. 
Trespassing, 295. 
Tug— 

Phoenix, transfer to New York, 381. 

Reliance, voyage with tow, 189, 309, 325, 341. 

Schedules. 70. 286. 

Repairs to Cocoli, 50. 
Tungsten lamp installation, 299. 

U 

Union Oil Company, oil delivery, 43. 
United Fruit Company. See Steamships. 
Unloaders. Central Division, records, 21. 51, 90, 129 
166, 195, 233.263, 295.326. 374,409. 



Vacation pay and leave, rules. 386. 
Valves, lock. 33. 65. 76. 92. 117, 145. 192,297. 
Vehicles, speed laws, 239. 
Villages — 

Gatun lake, 68. 120. 

Permanent, 277, 359. 397. 409 

W 

Washington hotel, 3, 69, 93, 246. 
Water — 

Agreement with Panama, 5. 

Church service. 123. 

Colon plans. 393. 

Culebra Cut supply, 91. 

Culebra Island supply, 25. 

Examination, rules and regulations, 354. 

Filtration plants. 157, 169, 393. 

Frijoles station. 295. 

Panama and Colon, agreement, 5. 

Panama supply. 5, 33, 58, 157, 253. 

Pumping stations, 33. 149. 349. 393. 

Rates for steamships. 39. 

Reservoirs. See Reservoirs. 

Rio Grande main, 33, 157. 253. 

Shortage and restrictions, 140, 290.303,366. 

Tank at Miraflores, 247. 
Weather- 
Heat records, 230, 281. 



INDEX 



Weather — 

Reports — 

Monthly, IS, 55, J 

330. 371, 402. 
Yearly. 169. 
Stations, change. 173. 
Storms, local, 4. 302. 
See also Rainfall. 
Wharves — 

See Docks. 



129, 163 219, 283. 299. 



Wireless station — 

Information from, 268. 

Proposed. 285. 
Women's Clubs — 

Delegates to General Federation, 351. 

Federation meeting, annual, 162, 183. 

Plans lor year, 22. 

See each issue. 
Work, private, by employes, 77. 



Work requests — 

Blanket orders, 307. 

Panama railroad, 106. 

Sanitary. 32, 123, 141. 
Wyse, Lieut. L. N. B.. bust unveiled. 



Yellow fever victims, 234, 374. 
Y. M. C. A. See Clubhouses. 



ILLUSTRATIONS, DRAWINGS, MAPS, DIAGRAMS, Etc. 



Culebra Cut — 

Excavation, 83, 153. 

Slides. 184. 
Dam. Pedro Miguel, 112. 
Dredge. Corozal, 257. 

Electric power plant, Gatun Spillway, 360-1. 
Electric transformer room, locks, 265-6. 
Excavation, Culebra Cut, 83, 153. 
Fenders, lock — 

Chains, 45, 208. 

Wall. 53. 



Gates — 



Lock machines, 161. 
Spillway machines, 68-9. 
Valve. 76. 



Hydroelectric plant. 360-1. 
Lighthouses and range towers. 104. 
Lighting of Canal, map, 102-3. 
Locks — 

Approach walls, Gatun, 321. 

Concrete arches, 113. 

Cover plates. 201. 

Electric transtorraer equipment, 265. 

Fenders. See Fenders. 

Gates. See Gates. 

Towing locomotive, 37. 

Towing tracks, 224. 

Valve, cylindrical. 93-4. 
Locomotive wheel tire, 114. 



Map, lighting of Canal, 102-3. 
Panama railroad station. 329. 
Pneumatic hammer, 400. 
Red Cross seal, 105. 
Sanitary drinking cup, 390, 
Slides, Culebra Cut. 184. 
Spillway gate machines, 68-9. 
Steamshovel — 

Dipper trip, 85. 

Rail clamp, 74. 
Towing locomotive, 37. 
Towing tracks, 224. 
Whart, lumber. Balboa, 144. 



CANAL 




RECORD 



ANCON, CANAL ZONE, WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 30, 1911. No. 1. 



Volume V. 



The Canal Record 

Published weekly under the authority and supervision oj 
the Isthmian Canal Com?nission. 



The Canal Record is issued free of charge, one copy 
each, to all employes of the Commission and Panama 
Railroad Company whose names are on the gold roll. 
Extra copies and back numbers can be obtained from the 
news stands of the Panama Railroad Company for five 
cents each. 

Address all Communications 

THE CANAL RECORD* 

• Ancon, Canal Zone, 

Isthmus of Panama. 

No communication, either for publication or requesting 
information, will receive attention unless signed with the 
full name and address of the writer. 

NOTES OF PROGRESS. 



Two Years at Gatun Locks. 

Concrete laying at Gatun Locks was begun 
on August 24, 1909, and on August 24, 1911, 
there had been placed 1.548790 cubic yards, 
leaving to be placed 451,210 cubic yards. 
An average of 2,183 cubic yards was laid 
per working day during the period August 
24, 1909 to August 24, 1910, and an average 
of 2,911 cubic yards per working day during 
the period August 24, 1910 to August 24, 
1911. 

The work has been done by two plants, 
one consisting of eight 2-yard cube mixers, 
whose product is placed by four duplex 
cableways stretching across the lock site, and 
the other, of two 2-yard cube mixers, whose 
product is conveyed to place by construction 
railway. The cableway plant was not in full 
operation until January, 1910, although it 
began work on August 24, and the second 
plant began mixing concrete on December 27, 
1909. The advance of the work from month 
to month is shown in the following statement: 



M ONIBS. 



January. . . 
February. . 
March .... 

April 

May 

June 

July 

August 
September. 
October . . . 
November. 
December . 

Total . . . 



1910. 



1,298 
12.294 
29.378 
30,270 
42,832 



54,136 
55,696 
60.998 
63,227 
74,273 
89,401 
84.001 
85,686 
76.720 
86,949 
75,152 
80,212 



72,919 
72,103 
86,884 
67,361 
67.844 
55.305 
71.046 
*52,805 



pletion. Three of the duplex cableways are 
working over the lower locks, the fourth 
having been withdrawn from concrete laying 
to handle iron and back fill at the upper locks. 
The distribution of concrete yet to be placed 

will be about, as follows: 

Ca. Yds. 
Upper lock and forebay, including flare walls . . 16,926 

Middle lock 32,897 

Lower lock, including side flare walls and exclu- 
sive of center approach wall 326,035 

Upper guide wall, center 32,766 

Lower guide wall, center 42,586 

Total 451,210 



Armoring the West Breakwater, Colon. 

The first barge load of rock for armoring 
the west breakwater, extending from Toro 
Point into Limon Bay, was brought from 
Porto Bello by the tugEmpire on Wednesday, 
August 23. and has been dumped on the north 
side of the trestle fill, near its shore end. 
At the breakwater, the barges are towed into 
a small harbor, where the rock is unloaded 
by locomotive cranes upon Lidgerwood flat 
cars, which are run out upon the trestle, where 
the rock is ploughed off at the points desired. 
This method will give way, presently, to 
that of unloading by derrick barges, which 
will lift the rock from the scows, and place it 
upon the breakwater in one operation. Work 
on these derrick barges has been delayed by 
the tardiness of the contractors in the United 
States in the delivery of material. 

The pieces of rock designed for armoring 
the breakwater will be broken, as far as 
possible, to size, and when the quarry is well 
opened up they will weigh as high as 15 tons. 
The rock is handled w r ith "dogs," holes being 
bored into each piece to give the points a 
better purchase. In unloading onto the 
barges, the pieces of rock are deposited in 
order, so as to facilitate their unloading. The 
output as yet is small, only two barge loads 
having been received since the work began. 
This is mainly due, however, to the cleaning 
up of that part of the quarry' where the selected 
rock is to be obtained. 

The breakwater trestle now extends about 
6,400 feet into the bay from the shore line. 



116,072 886,451 j 546,267 



♦August 1 to 24. 

The amount of concrete placed each month 
will decrease steadily from this time forth, 
because the floor in all three locks is com- 
pleted, and the second plant, which was largely 
engaged on the floor work, cannot be used to 
full capacity much longer. The walls in the 
upper and middle locks are practically com- 
pleted, and the placing of concrete in large 
quantities is now confined to the lower locks, 
the walls of which are rapidly nearing corn- 



Hydraulic Fill of Colon Completed. 

The hydraulic fill of the city of Colon was 
completed on August 4, and dredge No. 86, 
which performed the greater part of the work.' 
was withdrawn on that date, and placed in 
the drydock at Mount Hope for a general 
overhauling. The total amount of fill was 828,- 
582 cubic yards. As the work advanced, it was 
found desirable to make the fill considerably 
higher in places than the established grade, 
in order to utilize the surplus in raising 
various low spots, which the discharge pipe 
of the dredge could not reach to advantage. 
It was possible to supply this extra fill, and, 
at the same time, to come within the limit of 
the amount to be expended, by reason of a 
lower yardage cost than was first estimated. 
All of the material was taken from Folks 



River, just east of the Mount Hope road, and 
this part of the bayou has been deepened 
to an average depth of about 30 feet. 

The Colon fill was begun on November 5, 
1910, by the dredge Sandpiper, which was 
exchanged on the 13th of that month for 
dredge No. 86. which was operated uninter- 
ruptedly until the completion of the work 
three months ago. The best monthly record 
made was that of July, 1911, when 124.949 
cubic yards were placed. A report of the fill, 
by months, follows: 

Quantity. 
Month. Cu. Yds. 

November 1 to 12, 1910, by Sandpiper 22,317 

November 14 to 30, 1910, by dredge No. 86 . 43,970 

December, 1910 97.731 

January. 191 1 1 12,841 

February. 1911 70,826 

March. 1911 84,948 

April, 1911 92.361 

May. 1911 76,501 

June, 1911 97,149 

July. 1911 124,949 

August 1 to 4, 191 1 4.989 

Total 828,582 

At the Atlantic Entrance. 

The Canal has been extended to its full 
width at the Atlantic entrance as far inland 
as the old French canal, a distance from deep 
water of about five and a half miles, and there 
is a depth of at least 20 feet for the whole 
of this distance. The dipper dredge Chagres 
has rejoined the dredging fleet after extensive 
repairs in the Mount Hope drydock. A new 
boom and new bull wheel were put on, and all 
the machinery was given a thorough over- 
hauling. This dredge is digging in rock, and 
excavating to the full depth of 41 feet. Ladder 
dredge No. 1 has been taken to the drydock, 
where the hull will be repaired, the machinery 
overhauled, and the end of the ladder will 
be renewed. The tug DeLesseps has been sent 
to drydock, where its boiler will be replaced 
by one already used on the work, but in 
condition to stand the wear until the com- 
pletion of the Canal. Within a few hundred 
yards of the dredges, near the French canal, 
two steam shovels are working in the pit at 
Mindi, excavating in the dry a quantity of 
rock and earth that still remains before the 
channel through the Mindi hills will be com- 
pleted. One of the shovels is taking out the 
last of the soft earth at the north end of the 
pit, and when this work is completed, the 
greatest difficulty will be past. The other 
shovel is taking out rock at the north end. 
All the rock has been blasted. The spoil is 
hauled to Gatun, where it is needed in the 
back fill at the locks. Only two shovels are 
kept at work, because sufficient cars cannot 
be furnished to a greater number, the small- 
ness of the pit, the heavy grade up which the 
trains must run to gain the natural level of 
the land, and the sloppy condition of the pit 
after each rain, making it unprofitable to 
expand the transportation service. The work 
here will be finished in about six months. 

Between the place where the dredges are 
working, and the pit in which the shovels are 



THE CANAL RECORD 



Vol. V., No., 1. 



NOTES OF PROGRESS. 



{Continued.) 



digging, there are about 400,000 cubic yards 
of material to be excavated, mostly rock. No 
work is being done on this section at present, 
because removing material from it might 
cause a slide in the barrier that has been 
thrown up between the French canal and the 
steam shovel pit 



Change in Telephone Service. 

A contract has been entered into between 
the Panama Railroad Company, and the 
Isthmian Telephone Company, a local cor- 
poration organized for the purpose of con- 
ducting a general telephone business, in- 
cluding the operation of exchanges at Colon 
and Panama, by which the railroad company 
transfers its commercial toll line business in 
respect to calls originating at Colon or 
Panama, to the telephone company. For 
some time past, the railroad company haa 
been furnishing unlimited toll line service to 
business houses in the cities of Colon and 
Panama at the fixed rate of S7.50 per month. 
This service will be discontinued on September 
1, the date the new contract takes effect, and 
the telephone company will at once establish 
its toll line service, using the railroad com- 
pany's through circuits, out of Panama, and 
Colon. 

The message rate for the present will be 
10 cents, United States currency, based upon 
a 3-minute conversation. All conversations 
beyond the 3-minute limit will be charged for 
at the rate of 10 cents for each additional 
3-minute period. Under the contract, how- 
ever, this rate may be changed upon mutual 
agreement. An all night service will be main- 
tained. 

The telephone company has an exchange 
in operation in Colon, equipped with a 
switchboard of Monarch make, and has ob- 
tained a concession for the establishment of 
another local exchange in the city of Panama, 
for which it has ordered a sw-itchboard of 
the same type as at Colon. The contract does 
not include the Canal Zone in its scope, and the 
present arrangement of charging a sub- 
scriber, who wishes a telephone for commer- 
cial business, ,S7.50 per month for the service, 
will continue to obtain at all intermediate 
points. The exchanges of the railroad com- 
pany will be conn cted into the exchanges of 
the telephone company by suitable trunking 
facilities, the cost of which will be borne by 
the telephone company. The contract also 
provides that official business shall take 
precedence over the business of the telephone 
company in the transmission of calls over 
the circuits set aside for the telephone com- 
pany's use, should occasion arise. 

A telephone pay station has been installed 
in the Hotel Tivoli. A new booth has been 
constructed and placed within the enclosure 
of the news stand in the hotel foyer. Guests 
of the hotel are charged for calls made from 
the rooms to points outside of the hotel. The 
following tariff rate has been adopted: 

Cold. 

Panama, or Ancon 10c 

Corozal exchange 20c 

Empire exchange 20c 

Gorgona exchange 25c 

Gatun exchange 45c 

Colon, orCristobal 50c 

Toro Point 50c 

All carls are charged to the occupant of the 
room from which the call comes. Calls per- 
taining to official business of the Isthmian 



Canal Commission, or the Panama railroad, 
will be free. The system went into effect 
August 14. 



A method of procedure has been approved 
for the installation of the operating machinery 
for the locks and spillways. The work of 
installation will be done under the Assistant 



Chief Engineer, and certain preliminary- 
work by the construction divisions concerned. 
The method was devised by a committee, 
consisting of Edward Schildhauer of the 
Assistant Chief Engineer's force, John M. G. 
Watt of the Pacific Division, and Geo. M. 
Wells of the Atlantic Division. 



CONCRETE WORK IN THE LOCKS. 



About 63 per cent of the concrete for all the locks is in place, the amount at the close of 
the work on August 26, being 2,642,129 cubic yards, out of a total of approximately 4,199,400. 
A total of 34,289 j cubic yards of concrete was laid in the locks during the week ending August 26. 

GATUN LOCKS. 

Over 77 per cent of the concrete for the system of three twin locks at Gatun has been 
laid, the amount in place at the close of work on August 26, being 1,556,508 cubic yards, 
out of a total of 2,000,000. A statement of the amount of concrete placed in the locks each 
working day for the week ending August 26, and of the total, follows; and a similar statement 
for the work in the Spillway of Gatun Dam is published elsewhere in this issue. The con- 
struction plant works 12 hours daily, and the auxiliary plant 9 hours. 



Date. 



Construction Plant. 
2-cubic yard mixers. 



Concrete, Hours 
placed, worked. 



No. of 
mixers 



Auxiliary Plant. 
2-cubic yard mixers 



Concrete 
placed. 



Hours 
worked . 



No. of 
mixers 



Large 
stone. 



Total. 



August 21 

August 22 

August 23 

August 24 

August 25 

August 26 

♦Portable mixers . 



Cu. Yds 
1,300 
1,538 
1,898 
1.900 
1,796 
1,780 



25.04 
24.46 
31.26 
31.04 
28.46 
27.47 



Total 

Previously reported 

Grand totr>.l 1.556.508 



Cu. Yds. 
408 
482 
512 
278 
456 
528 
5445 



3.208J 



7.40 
7.40 
8.40 
6.40 
7.40 
S.40 



Cu. 



Yds. 
126 
184 
242 

90 
4 

34 



Cu. Yds. 
1.834 
2,204 
2.652 
2,268 
2.256 
2,342 
544$ 



14.100! 
.542,407 J 



*The 5 44 k yards shown t or the portable mixers are reinforced concrete, and were placed on the following days : 
August 21st, 87; August 22nd, 75$; August 23d. 100; August 24th, 99$: August 25tn, 101$: August 26th, 81. 

PEDRO MIGUEL LOCKS. 

Concrete work in the locks at Pedro Miguel is over 85 per cent completed, 711,798 cubic 
yards, out oi a total of 837,400, having been placed at the close of work on August 26. The 
record for each of the six 8-hour working days of last week, follows: 





Auxiliary Plant. 


Large 
stone. 






2-cubi 

Concrete 
placed. 


: yard mixers. 

Hours ! No. of 
worked, mixers 


$-cubic yard mixer. 


Total. 




Concrete 
placed. 


Hours 
worked. 


No. of 

mixers 






Cu. Yds. 
672 
580 
600 
552 
498 
438 


19.00 
17.00 
18.00 
16.00 
14.00 
14.00 


3 
3 
3 

3 
2 
3 


; u. Yds. 
229 
195 
170 
72 
146 
275 


12.25 
10.83 
10.50 
5.00 
7 00 
16.67 


2 
2 
2 

2 
3 


Cu. Yds. 


Cu. Yds. 
901 




775 




770 




624 




644 




713 












3.340 


98,00 


2.83 


1,087 


62.25 i 2 


4,441 


4.427 




707.371 


















4,441 


711,798 

















MIRAFLORES LOCKS. 

Over 27 per cent of the concrete for the system of two twin locks at Miraflores was in 
place on August 26, the total amount on that date being 373,823 cubic yards, out of a total of 
approximate^- 1,362,000. The record for each of the six 8-hour working days of last week, 
follows: 





Construction Plant. 
2-cubic yard mixers. 




Auxiliary Plant. 






Date. 


2-cubic yard mixers. 


J-cubic yard mixer. 


Total. 




Concrete 
placed. 


Hours 
worked . 


! | 

No. of Concrete Hours 
mixers placed, i worked. 


No. of 
mixers 


Concrete 
placed. 


Hours 
worked. 


No. of 

mixers 


Large 
stone. 




Aug. 21 . . 
Aug. 11 ■ ■ 
Aug. 23 . . 
Aug. 24 . . 
Aug. 25 . . 
Aug. 26 . . 


Cu. Yds. 
1.608 
1,554 
1.352 
1 ,348 
1,770 
1.410 


39.00 
34.07 
30.03 
29.27 
35.67 
31.50 


6 
6 
6 
5 
6 
6 


Cu. Yds. 

906 
820 
932 
1.052 
1.21S 
926 


13.75 
13.00 
14.40 
15.33 
17.50 
13.75 


2 
2 
2 
2- 

2 
2 


Cu. Yds. 

264 

224 

68 

94 

88 

128 


19.00 
18.50 
6.00 
6.50 
6.00 
8.00 


3 
3 
2 
1 
1 
1 


Cu. Yds. 


Cu. Yds. 
2,778 
2,598 
2,352 
2,494 
3,076 
2,464 


Total . . 
Previously 
reported . 


9,042 


199.54 


5.83 


5,854 


77.73 


2 


866 


64.00 


1.83 


3,693 


15,762 
358,061 






















Grand 


3.693 


373,823 

























August 30, 1911. 



THE CANAL RECORD 



SOCIAL LIFE OF THE ZONE. 



Women's Clubs. 

There will be a meeting of the executive 
board of the Canal Zone Federation of 
Women's Clubs at Cristobal on Friday, 
September S. According to the provisions of 
the revised by-laws, adopted at the annual 
meeting in April, the executive board is com- 
posed of the officers of the federation, the 
librarian, and the presidents of the federated 
clubs. Arrangements for the annual meeting 
to be held in January, 1912, will be made, 
and such special committees as are needful 
for the work will be appointed. 



Church Notes. 



The ceremony of blessing the parish house 
in connection with St. Ferdinand's Roman 
Catholic Church, Empire, was held on Sun- 
day, August 20. [ Following the celebration 
of solemn high mass in the church at 9 a. m., 
a procession, formed of three priests, eight 
brothers of the Vincentian Order, and three 
Sisters of Charity of the same order, the 
children of the church, and members of the 
church societies, proceeded to the parish 
house, where the ceremony took place. The 
building, as remodeled, contains an assem- 
bly hall, three bedrooms, a priest's study, a 
refectory, kitchen, pantries, and servants' 
quarters. The Commission has contrib- 
uted the furnishings throughout the living 
apartments, and the members of the congre- 
gation have placed such furniture as is 
necessary in the assembly hall. Social enter- 
tainments in connection with the opening of 
the house, were a meeting of the negro 
members of the congregation on Sunday after- 
noon, August 20, and a "smoker" held by the 
members of St. Ferdinand's Club on Wednes- 
day evening, August 23. The two priests in 
charge have taken up residence in the parish 
house. All meetings of the church societies 
will be held in the assembly hall. 

The members of the club of men and women 
connected with the Roman Catholic church 
in Las Cascadas, held a reception at the 
home of Mrs. W. W. Bowers on Saturday 
evening, August 19. The reception was a 
farewell to Mrs. Bowers, who is leaving Las 
Cascadas after a residence of four vears. 



Protestant Episcopal Missions. 

The annual report of the Panama Mission 
of the Protestant Episcopal Church for the 
year ending June 30, shows that there are 
four priests in charge of the Canal Zone 
missions for Americans, with headquarters 
at Culebra, Ancon, Colon, and Empire. 
Two West Indian clergymen are in charge of 
missions at Gatun and Culebra. During the 
year, three priests resigned, and one was 
appointed to the hospital chapel at Ancon. 
Beside the priests, there are ten catechists. 
These men are West Indian negroes, and they 
areappointed by the General Missionary Board 
upon passing an examination. Bytheiraid, 
w-ith one deacon, the clergy are enabled to 
maintain regular weekly services in 15 
missions, and to provide occasional services 
at other stations. 

Ow-ing to the progress of the Canal work, 
and the demolition of the villages of Taber- 
nilla and San Pablo, the missions at those 
places have gone out of existence. Many of 
the former residents of the villages have re- 
moved to Pedro Miguel, and the organization 



of a mission there is projected as soon as funds 
for the erection of a church building can be 
raised. 

The present missions for white congrega- 
tions are located at Empire, Cujebra, and 
Ancon. At Colon, Christ Church minis- 
ters to West Indians and Americans. Pro- 
vision is made for regular services at 
Gatun and at Gorgona. Missions for West 
Indian negroes are located at Mount Hope, 
New Gatun, Bas Obispo, Gorgona, Las Cas- 
cadas, Empire, Culebra, Paraiso, and Pan- 
ama. A rectory has been built at Gatun by 
the Church Missions building fund. There is 
an unorganized mission at Pleya del Flor, 
which is visited regularly by one of the 
priests. There are eight chapters of the 
Brotherhood of St. Andrew, with a total 
membership of 150. In connection with the 
churches in Colon, Empire, Culebra, and 
Ancon, there are altar guilds composed of 
American women. 



New Salvation Army Institute. 

The restaurant in the new Salvation Army 
institute at Cristobal was opened for business 
on Monday, August 28. The new institute, 
which was rebuilt by the Commission to take 
the place of the one destroyed in the fire of 
March 23, is situated on the Mount Hope 
road, about 500 feet south of the original 
site. It is two stories in height, 68 feet by 
35-1 feet, approximately of the same length, 
but considerably wider than the old building, 
thus materially increasing the amount of 
floor space. 

The restaurant occupies the front room on 
the first floor, as formerly, but, on account of 
the increased w,idth of the building, it has a 
much larger seating capacity. The counter, 
where the lunches are prepared, is on the 
right as one enters. As heretofore the custom, 
only light refreshments, consisting mainly of 
coffee, cocoa, sandwiches, and eggs in various 
styles, will be served. A small kitchen opens 
from the restaurant on the right, and another 
doorway leads into a reading room. From this 
room is an entrance to the dormitory, a large 
apartment occupying the entire rear of the first 
floor, capable of accommodating upward of 
100 lodgers. It will be equipped with berths 
ranged along the sides of the room, and a 
night's lodging will be furnished, as formerly 
for 25 cents, or, in the case of the destitute, free. 
There are two outside entrances downstairs, 
one a front entrance for the use of the restau- 
rant patrons, and the other, a side entrance 
for the lodgers. 

There are seven rooms upstairs for the use 
of the commanding officer and his family, 
and assistants, one of which will be devoted 
to office purposes. All of the front rooms on 
the second floor open on a veranda. The 
Salvation Army on the Isthmus, of which 
Adjutant George Catlin is the divisional head, 
now comprises six corps — two at Colon, one 
each at Panama, Empire, Gorgona, and 
Gatun. He also has under his jurisdiction 
the corps at Bocas del Toro, and one at Port 
Limon, visiting both places four times a year. 



Postal Business and Canal Zone Revenues. 

During the month of July, the Canal Zone 
money order business amounted to $407,- 
397.91 in orders issued, of which there were 
16,669. The average value of orders issued 
was S24.44. Of the S407.397.91 in orders 
issued, S305, 895. 68 was pavablein the United 
States, $100,969.73 in the Canal Zone, $372.50 



in Martinique, and $160 in Costa Rica. The 
fees amounted to SI, 811.04, and the amount 
paid and repaid was $120,906.35. Postal sales 
amounted to $6,010.79, and newspaper 
postage 20 cents. 

Canal Zone revenues during the month of 
July were, as follows: 

Distillation licenses S47.S 21 

Bicycle and chauffeur licenses 23 1 . 00 

Motor vehicle licenses 188.00 

Taxes, licenses, etc 8.489.04 

Total $9.383 . 25 



PERSONAL. 



Major Chester Harding, Major J. P 
Jervey, and Major T. C. Dickson, accom- 
panied by their wives sailed on ihe Ancon for 
the States on August 25 on annual leave of 
absence. 



Convention of Postal Clerks. 

The first annual meeting of the Canal Zone 
postal clerks will be held at Taboga Island 
on Labor Day, September 4. All post-offices 
will be closed the entire day, and official 
transportation will be issued to postmasters 
and clerks from their respective stations to 
Panama, and return, in order that they may- 
attend the convention. 



Tau Beta PI. 

All members of Tau Beta Pi, on the Isth- 
mus, are requested to send their names to 
T. C. Morris, Gatun, C. Z. 



Transfer of Odd Fellows Lodge. 
The transfer of Canal Zone Lodge, No. 3, 
Independent Order of Odd Fellows from 
Culebra to Empire, will take place this week, 
and the first meeting in the new quarters will 
be held on Saturday evening. September 2. 
All members are requested to attend. 



Moving the Washington Hotel. 

The Washington Hotel at Colon was closed 
on August 19 for the purpose of moving it to 
another site, out of the way of the improve- 
ments in connection with the new hotel and 
grounds. It will be transferred to a vacant 
lot back of Christ church, near the Garfield 
House, and will have the same relative posi- 
tion as at present, with one end abutting on 
Bolivar street. The work of lifting the 
structure off its foundations and placing it 
on rollers is now in progress. Originally, the 
present building consisted of two stories, and 
was built about the year 1870. A third story 
was added about six years ago. It will be 
reopened for business upon its removal to the 
new location. 



Rules for the guidance of employes in 
charge of oil-burning equipment have been 
printed in English, and will be printed in 
Spanish. 

Band Concert. 

A concert will be g'ven by the Isthmian Canal Com- 
mission Band at Gatun, C Z., on Sunday, September 
3, 1911, at 5 p. m. The program follows: 

1 . March — Ideal Reeves 

2 Selection — The Spring Maid Reinhardt 

3. Duet for cornet and baritone — Miserere. . . .Verdi 

Messrs. Sanmartin and Follman. 

4. Overture — Fest Luetner 

5. Waltz — Casino Tanze Gung'l 

6. (a) Medley march — Kiss Me Honey, 

Kiss Me Snyder 

O) Two step— Casey Jones Newton 

7. Reverie — Silent Thought Morrison 

8. Medley selection — Remick's Hits Lampe 

9. March — The Arbitrator >. . Bagley 

Chas. E. Jennings. Musical Director. 
The next concert will be given at the Hotel Tivoli, 
on September 10, at 7.30 p. m. 



THE CANAL RECORD 



Vol. V., No. 1. 



FLAMENCO ISLAND GRAVES. 



Removal of Remains of Sailors and Others Buried 
There. 

Thirty-one graves of persons buried, from 
time to time, during the past 50 years on 
Flamenco, or Dead Man's Island, in Panama 
Bay, have recently been transferred to Ancon 
cemetery to make way for the fortification 
work. There were two cemetery plots, one 
on the northeast side of the high rock mass, 
which forms the greater part of the island, 
and another and larger plot on the west side, 
facing Naos Island. It is not known how 
many persons have been interred on the is- 
land, as it is probable, in view of the condition 
some of the tombstones and markers were in, 
that many others have long since disappeared, 
leaving unmarked graves. The greater part 
of the burials were of persons who died on 
board vessels en route to Panama, or while 
the vessels were at anchor in Panama Bay. 
Officers and sailors from the United States 
Navy, who fell victims to yellow fever, con- 
tributed a large percentage of the total 
number, and, in the case of the U. S. S. James- 
town, and that of the U. S. S. Lancaster, the 
loss was especially heavy. 

Wolfred Nelson, in his book, "Five years 
in Panama," makes reference to the case 
of the U. S. S. Jamestown, but appears to 
have confounded it with that of the U. S. S. 
Lancaster, for he says"* * * * On the face 
of the island toward the city of Panama, one 
sees a handsome monument, which was erected 
in memory of the officers and men of the 
United States ship Jamestown, who fell 
victims to yellow fever while anchored there 
in the year 1858. Eighty of her officers and 
crew were buried there. * * * * " The 
monument in question was erected to those 
who died on board the U. S. S. Lancaster 
in 1861. There is a monument to the memory 
of a paymaster on the U. S. S. Jamestown. 
but the date given is 1867. 

There were burials on the island up to 
1911, the last being that of a man who was 
drowned at the Flamenco anchorage in 
December, 1910. In most cases, very little 
was found to indicate the presence of a grave; 
a few bones, generally the teeth, and, in one 
instance, a number of brass buttons were 
exhumed. These were placed in separate 
boxes, and reinterred in a place set aside for 
the purpose in Ancon cemetery, marked with 
their proper headstones and monuments. 
There were a number of Chinese buried on 
the island, but only two graves were removed, 
the transfer being made by members of that 
race. No body was permitted to be exhumed 
that had not been buried at least 18 months. 
The grave of a plague victim, who died in 
quarantine, a short time ago, was, therefore, 
left untouched. 

The monuments, tombstones, or markers 
found intact, and their inscriptions are, as 
follows: 

In small cemetery upon the hill. — Tall 
monument, inscribed on four sides, as follows: 
First side — "Lieut. J.Whipple Harris, born in 
New Hampshire, died August 24, 1861, aged 
24 years." Second — "James McBride, Ire- 
land, died August 12, 1861, aged 28; Stephen 
Mullins, Ireland, died August 18, 1861, aged 
21; Francis McCabe, New York, died August 
18, 1861, aged 27; Alfonso Worden, New 
York, died August 27, 1861, aged 28." 
Third — "The officers and crew attached to 
the U. S. S. Lancaster, flag officer, J. B. Mont- 
gomery, have just arrived in these seas, and 



erect this monument in memory of those who 
died and are buried here." Fourth — "John 
McCarthy, Ireland, died January 30, 1860, 
aged 25; Andrew Jackson, New York, died 
August 14,1860, aged 27; Patrick Barry, Ire- 
land, died August 10, 1861, aged 32; Henry 
C. Cummings, Pennsylvania, died August 12, 
1861, aged 22." 

Tombstone, inscribed "In memory of 
Sergeant William A. Corwin, U. S. Navy, 
died March 11, 1886, on board U. S. S. Adams, 
erected by his messmates." 

Tombstone, inscribed "Michael Grady, 
aged 37; John Collier, aged 33." 

Monument, inscribed "John Adams Bates, 
paymaster, died of yellow fever off Panama, 
on U. S. S. Jamestown, March 4, 1867, aged 
29 years." 

In large cemetery on west side of island. — 
Tombstone inscribed "Frida Volguardsen, 
born at Mazatlan, October 27, 1878, died on 
board City of Panama, March 19, 1879." 

Tombstone, inscribed "George Hale, apoth- 
ecary. U. S. S. Tuscard, aged 29, died March 
18, 1873." 

Tombstone inscribed "J. A. Mullin, died 
November 15, 1861, aged 26." 

Tombstone, inscribed "Died in Panama, 
November 20, 1861, Alonzo James K.. only 
child of James S. and Hannah Hermann, 
aged 3 months, 19 days," with epitaph 
reading "Who plucked this bud? The Mas- 
ter, the Gardener willeth but is silent." 

Tombstone inscribed "In memory of Alex. 
H. Charles, master machinist, Naos Island, 
a native of Burast Island, Fifeshire, Scotland, 
died September 6, 1885, aged 29 years." 

Tombstone, inscribed "LeRoy B Westfall, 
first officer steamship /. L.» Stephens, died 
April 13, 1856, aged 43." 

Tombstone, inscribed "S. L. Halladay, a 
native of Sydney, died December 14, 1867, 
aged 26." 

Tombstone, inscribed "Commander Leon- 
ard Paulding, U. S. N., commander U. S. S. 
Wateree, died April 29, 1867." 

Tombstone, inscribed "Mrs, Mary Kehoe, 
late Mrs. Mary Rosseter of Dublin, Ireland, 
born 1796, died April 29, 1860, erected by 
her only surviving children, George R. and 
John H. Rosseter." 

Monument on the grave of the U. S. S. 
Lancaster officers, inscribed "William J. 
Whipple Harris, lieutenant, U. S. N., born 
at Portsmouth, July 5, 1837, died on board 
U. S. S. flagship Lancaster, in Panama Bay, 
August 24, 1861." 

Tombstone, inscribed "I. L. Foster, died 
July 24, 1862, aged 5 years 6 months and 4 
days. Willie P. Foster, died July 26, 1862, 
aged 3 years 10 months and 22 days; children 
of William and Mary J. Foster." 

Tombstone, inscribed "John G. Hill, late 
chief engineer Pacific Steam Navigation 
Company's steamer Quito, died of yellow 
fever in Panama Bay, May 14, 1903. R. I. P." 

Tombstone, inscribed Charles Henry Mid- 
dleton, born June 12, 1806, died May 20, 
1872." 

Wooden cross, with the words, in Spanish, 
"Fallecio, Gregorio Carrasco, el 20 de Junio, 
1910." 

Tombstone, inscribed "Frederick Long- 
worth Hodkinson, second engineer, P. S. N. 
S. S Quito, son of John Alfred, and Anne 
Hodkinson, England, June 8, 1886 — March 
1, 1909." He died of yellow fever en route 
to Panama from Guayaquil. 

Monument, inscribed "Charles T. Cornell, 



aged 26, born at Kerry, Ireland, died May 15 
1895. U. S. S. Denver." 

Monument, inscribed "H. R. Barclay, 
chief engineer P. S. N. S. S. South Carolina, 
died August 30, 1883, aged 44." 

Monument, inscribed "Bryan Ackland, 
aged 24, died at sea of yellow fever, 21st of 
December, 1909." This man was on his way 
up from Guayaquil, and died before the 
vessel he was on reached Panama. 

Tombstone, inscribed in Spanish, "Fallecio, 
Eugenio Achaddea. 31 de Diciembre, 1910." 
This man was drowned off a hulk at the 
Flamenco Island anchorage. 

Monument, inscribed "Andrew Blasykon- 
ski, purser, U. S. Navy, died May 4, 1902, 
aged 25." 

Headstone, with only the initials "L. R. 
W." There was another headstone, which 
was broken. The only words remaining on it 
were "Died June 31, aged 32." There was 
still another broken stone, with the words 
"In memory of my beloved husband, Tobias 
Y. Burke of Maryland, born June 4, 1836; 
died November 6. 1888. D. B. S. A." 



Gatun Dam Spillway. 

The concrete work in the Spillway of Gatun 
Dam is over 68 per cut completed, 152,764 
cubic yards, out of a total of 225,000, having 
been placed at the close of work on August 
26. A statement of the amount laid each 
working day last week, and of the total in 
place, follows: 



Date. 


Concrete 
Laid. 


Hours 
worked. 


No. 
Mixers. 




200 
172 
200 
184 
188 
120 


15.00 
12.00 
16.00 
15.00 
14.00 
12.00 


2 




2 




2 




2 




2 




2 








1,064 
151.700 


84.00 


2 


Previously reported. . . 






152.764 







Porto Bello Crusher. 

A statement of the rock crushed at Porto 
Bello quarry during the week ending August 
26, follows: 



August 21 
August 22 
August 23 
August 24 
August 25 
August 26 




Cubic 
Yards. 

1,155 
754 
947 
1,190 
1.897 
1,981 



7,924 



Resolutions of Respect and Sympathy. 

The Pedro Miguel Masonic Club has 
adopted resolutions of respect in connection 
with the death of John C. Blair, a copy of 
which has been forwarded to Renovo Lodge, 
No. 495, Renovo, Pa., with which he was 
affiliated. 

At the meeting of the Isthmian Canal 
Rebekah Lodge, No. 1, Gorgona, Independent 
Order of Odd Fellows, resolutions of sympathy 
were passed on the death of Mrs. Otis, the 
mother of Mr. Harry Otis of Gorgona. 



At Culebra, on August 18, during a local 
rain storm, the wind reached a velocity of 38 
miles an hour, blowing from the northeast. 
This is the second highest velocity recorded 
at this station, the highest being 39 miles an 
hour on July 20, 1910. 



August 30, 1911. 



THE CANAL RECORD 



GATUN POWER PLANT. 






Bids to be Asked for Hydroelectric Equipment 
for Permanent Use. 

Bids will be advertised for in the near 
future for the following materials and equip- 
ment for the hydroelectric generating plant 
at the Spillway in Gatun Dam: Three water 
turbines, 2250 kilowatts each - 3 governors; 
3 headgates; 3 penstocks; 3 compressed air 
regulators; 3 electric generators; 3 exciters; 
2 motor-driven exciter sets; one lubricating 
system; one 20-ton traveling crane. The 
switchboard, cable control, and electric fix- 
tures will be advertised for later. 

The equipment is for the generating station 
that will furnish current for power to operate 
the gates, valves, and other machinery of the 
locks, the regulating works of the spillways 
of Gatun and Miraflores dams, and will fur- 
nish light for the same, as well as light and 
power along the Canal. Two proposals will be 
requested, one for a plant to be installed in 
the center of the Dam at the Spillway, and 
the other below the Dam at the Spillway, the 
advantage of the latter location being 
greater head. Water for both plants will 
be taken from Gatun Lake at the Spillway, 
where regulating gates will keep the maximum 
elevation as near 87 feet above sea level as 
possible, and where, at the end of the four 
months' dry season, the water may fall as low- 
as 79 feet above sea level. From a concrete 
forebay in the Spillway dam, water will be 
carried in penstocks, equipped with headgates 
and compressed air regulators, or surge tanks, 
to the turbines. 

For proposal No. 1, the average difference 
between the water levels in the lake and in 
the tailrace is estimated at 75 feet, and the 
turbines are rated on this basis, and are of 
the vertical type. For proposal No. 2, the 
turbines are to be rated upon the basis of an 
average difference of S3 feet in elevations. 
The topography in the vicinity of the 
lower end of the Spillway dam is suitable for 
either a vertical or horizontal type of turbine. 

Turbines — The turbines will be of the un- 
submerged, vertical shaft type, with not more 
than two runners per turbine, and with 
runners encased and in tandem; speed 300, 
250, or 214.3 rotations per minute, whichever 
is best adapted to the design of turbine. Each 
will deliver 2250 kilowatts at the shaft when 
the average difference in water levels is 75 
feet for proposal No. 1 , and 83 feet for proposal 
No. 2. In operation , the turbine will be subject 
to instantaneous fluctuations of load equal 
to 50 per cent of the full rating. The runners 
are to be of cast iron, or steel plate, or a com- 
bination of both, designed to give the blades 
maximum rigidity and strength, arranged to 
permit easy removal from the case, to with- 
stand all shock occasioned by water hammer, 
and an increase in speed of 100 per cent above 
normal. The outer casing Will be of cast iron, 
or steel plate, and the inner casing of cast iron; 
and every facility for the inspection, repair, 
and removal of the runners will be provided. 
The shaft will be of forged nickel steel, prefer- 
ably of hollow cross section, but alternative 
bids for a forged carbon steel shaft will be 
considered. The speed regulating gates will 
be of the balanced wicket type. A vertical 
thrust bearing of the hanging, ball, or roller 
type, is specified for the main bearing, but 
bids will also be considered for bearings of 
other types. Each turbine will be provided 
with quick acting, relay type governors, 
actuated either electrically or hydraulically, 



and of sufficient capacity for operating the 
gates smoothly, and in such time as will give 
the minimum variation in speed of the turbine. 
Each governor will be equipped with an 
auxiliary device for smoothly closing the 
gate in event of the failure of the governor to 
operate. 

Headgates — One headgate will be required 
to close the opening to each penstock. It 
will be constructed entirely of iron and steel, 
will run in cast iron or steel guides, and be 
raised and lowered by means of a vertical stem, 
to which motion will be transmitted by a 
vertical, nonrising worm, driven by a 220- 
volt, 3-phase, 25-cycle induction motor. Each 
gate will be equipped with an auxiliary valve 
for the purpose of passing water slowly into 
the penstock after periods of shut down or 
disuse of the turbine, and it must be of size 
to fill the penstock in approximately five 
minutes. After the penstock is filled, the 
headgate will open automatically. In front 
of the gates will be a trash rack of bar iron 
to protect the gates, penstock, and turbine 
from damage by debris carried in the water. 

Penstocks — The penstocks will be of the 
combination metal plate and concrete type. 
the metal being sufficiently strong to take 
the tension caused by the hydrostatic and 
impact pressures of the water, and the con- 
crete, the external pressure of the back fill. 
The concrete will be placed by the Com- 
mission and forms no part of the contract. 
The inside diameter of the penstocks will not 
be less than 10 feet 6 inches, the plates of 
wrought iron or soft steel not less than 
3-8 of an inch thick, and joined into a con- 
tinuous tube from gates to turbines, either by 
riveting or by lockbar joints. 

Compressed air regulators — The compressed 
air regulators, or surge tanks, are to be of the 
differential type, and will be located in the 
basement of the power house under the gen- 
erator room. The complete equipment will 
consist of one regulator attached to each pen- 
stock, a common header connected to a 
compressed air tank, two air compressors, 
and the necessary auxiliaries. The function 
of the regulator, in addition to acting as a 
buffer for shocks, due to rejected loads, will 
be to assist the governor in adjusting the 
turbine speed. It will be constructed of steel 
plates, air tight, and will be riveted to the 
penstock through a tapering nozzle of proper 
proportions to give the best results in speed 
regulation. 

Generators — The generators will be of the 
3-phase alternator type, capacity 2500 k. v. a. 
(2000 k. w.) at 80 per cent power factor; 
poles, 10, 12, or 1-1; voltage (delta) 2200; 
current per phase, 656 amperes; frequency, 25 
cycles per second; speed, 300, 250, or 214.3 
rotations per minute. They will be of the 
vertical, water turbine type, with separately 
excited, revolving field; armatures, star con- 
nected, and the neutral load to be brought to 
the same terminal block as' the phase loads. 
The characteristics of the generators shall be 
such that they may be operated in parallel, 
either with one another, or with the present 
installation of three 1500-k. v. a., 2200-volt, 
1500-r. p. m., 25-cycle, star connected, steam 
turbine-driven alternators, situated at Mira- 
flores, 40 miles distant, by transmission 
from Gatun Spillway. Owing to the starting 
and stopping of the many induction motors 
required in the operation of the several locks, 
the generators will be subjected to instan- 
taneous fluctuations of an extreme nature, and 



must be designed to meet the conditions of 
an instantaneous variation of load equal to 
50 per cent of the full load rating. An exciter 
generator of the direct current, shunt wound 
type, 50 kilowatts, 125 volts, 400 amperes, 
300, 250, or 214.3 rotations per minute, ver- 
tical type, will be mounted directly upon the 
shaft of each generator. 

Two motor-driven exciter sets of 100-k. w. 
capacity, a gravity type lubricating system 
with centrifugal pumps, and one 20-ton, 
3-motor traveling crane, to be erected in 
the power house, form part of the contract. 



Sewer and Water Connections in Colon and Pan- 
ama. 

President Arosemena of Panama has 
approved the agreement recently entered into 
with regard to the installation of water and 
sewer pipes in the cities of Colon and Panama, 
and has issued the following decree under 
date of July 21, 1911: 

Article 1. The provisions contained in the regulations 
governing the installation of water and sewer connec- 
tions in the cities of Panama and Colon are interpreted 
in the following manner: 

"When involving original construction in which the 
Commission constructs or lays water mains or sewer 
mains along the streets in which permanent buildings 
exist, the Commission will construct at the same time 
lateral extensions from these water or sewer mains 
to the edge of the sidewalk of the street, for the purpose 
of providing facilities to the owners of those buildings 
in order that they may make therein the necessary 
installations and connections; this work of lateral ex- 
tensions shall be collected as a part of the original 
work of the water and sewer mains, and paid by the 
Republic of Panama. When connections are made 
from the edge of the sidewalk to the buildings in 
question, their owners shall pay the cost of such work. 

"If the original construction of the water and sewer 
mains is made by the Commission in any of those 
cities along streets in which there are no buildings 
at the time of bringing such work to conclusion, then 
those lateral extensions from the water and sewer 
mains to the edge of the sidewalk shall not be made by 
the Commission unless the Government of the Republic 
requests it officially, and its cost shall be paid in the 
form agreed upon between the Government of the 
Republic and the authorities of the Commission. 

"In cases in which installation of plumbing must be 
made, and it is necessary to connect with the water 
or sewer mains in tne cities of Panama and Colon, and 
where those laterals have not been laid, such instal- 
lations shall be made, as follows: From the water or 
sewer main to the edge of the sidewalk by the Division 
of Public Works of the Department of Civil Adminis- 
tration of the Canal Zone; and from said edge up to 
and in the building by its owners through duly licensed 
plumbers, and the cost of the entire installation from 
the water or sewer main up to and in the building 
shall be paid by the owner of the same; all those in- 
stallations in both cities shall be made in accordance 
with the provisions and regulations upon the subject 
which have been heretofore or may hereafter bepromul- 
gated." 

Ancon Quarry. 

A statemenc of the rock crushed at Ancon 
quarry during the week ending August 26, 
follows: 



Date 

August 21 

August 22 

August 23 

August 24 

August 25 

August 26 

Total 




14.542 



Obituary. 

George Alfred Caldwell, sanitary inspector 
at Gatun, died at Colon Hospital on August 
26. He was 46 years of age, single, and was 
born in Kentucky. He was appointed to 
service on the Isthmus as a draftsman in the 
Division of Building Construction on July 29, 
1904, and was transferred to the Department 
of Sanitation on January 1. 1907. 



THE CANAL RECORD 



Vol.y., No. 1. 



COMMISSION CLUBHOUSES. 



Activities of the Young Men's Christian Associ- 
ation. 

The moving picture schedule for the week, September 
4 to 9 is, as follows: September 4, Gorgona; September 
5, Gatun; September 6, Cristobal; September 7, 
Culebra; September 8, Corozal; September 9, Empire. 

CULEBRA. 

The game of volleyball between the Married Men 
and the Bachelors on Friday evening resulted two to 
one in favor of the Bachelors. 

A volleyball tournament has been organized with 
five teams — Quartermaster, Chief Engineer. Married 
Men, Independent, and All Star. 

Messrs. Dougherty and Case have been chosen as 
captains of the Culebra bowling teams to^represent 
Culebra in the Isthmian league. 

EMPIRE. 

The following high scores were bowled on the alleys 
during the past week: Tenpins — Giavelli, 208; Pinney, 
212; Pearson, 214; Gustavson, 213. Duckpins — Pinney, 
100, 124; Grund, 109; Scull, 100; McLeod, 103, 104, 
105; Payne, 102; Pulsifer, 101; Danielson, 114; Davis, 
107. 

In the handicap tenpin tournament just closed, the 
following medals were won: Highest average. C. Ander- 
son, 186.1; second high average, J. Spinks, 185.9; 
highest percentage of games won, L. Giavelli, 31 out 
of 34; second high average, F. L. Gorham, 23 out of 34; 
highest flat score. L. Giavelli, 243; highest handicap 
score, R. Rosier, 249 (handicap 20). 

On Saturday evening. September 2, the Isthmian 
tenpin tournament will open, with Gatun playing at 
Empire. 

In the boys' handicap duckpin tournament just 
closed, the following were winners: High score, Donald 
Benninger. 113; high average, Maurice Witt, average 
88.2; most games, Wallace Catte, 11 out of 17. 

The subject for discussion by the literary and 
debating society for September 1 will be "Personal 
economy as a factor in industrial conditions." 

GORGONA. 

The Hearons Sisters' Concert Company appeared 
before an audience of over 300 on Tuesday night, 
August 22, and will nil a return engagement on Sat- 
urday, September 9, with an entire change of program. 

It has been decided to close the membership contest 
on Saturday night, September 23, when a "smoker" 
and entertainment will be given in honorof the winning 
team, the Gorgona indoor baseball team, champions 
of the Isthmian league, and the new members. 

The monthly song service on Sunday night, August 
2 7 was attended by about 150 people. The Rev. A. A. 
Nellis of Empire delivered an address, and Mrs. 
Jas. H. Murray, contralto, rendered two solos — 
"Absence" and "The Rosary" — in addition to the 
usual singing by the audience. The choir consisted of 
ten young ladies of Gorgona. 

The following members have been appointed a 
house committee to promote the general comfort and 
satisfaction of patrons, and make suggestions as to 
changes or improvement of the accommodations and 
service: C. Patterson. L. W. Hennen, Manning Meeks, 
W.J Earle.H.D. Burnham, J. C. Deavours.and W. H. 
Keenan. 

The dramatic society is rehearsing a two-act 
comedy sketch, which they expect to present in the near 
future. Arrangements have been made for the purchase 
of the necessary' properties. 

The tenpin bowling match between Camp Elliott 
and Gorgona on the local alleys on Saturday evening, 
August 28, resulted, as follows: 

Camp Elliott. Gorgona. 

May 154 138 119 M. Van 195 157 187 

Wright 142 174 158 Humphrey.. 149 154 188 

Schwartz.. 139 141 172 Haldeman.. 203 134 144 
Simpson.... 103 142 154 Haggerty... 149 156 168 
Martins 167 165 159 Roper 200 144 159 

Total 705 760 762 896 745 846 

GATUN. 

The preliminary chess and checker tournament 
resulted, as follows: 

Checkers — Won. Lost. Drawn. 

Gartrell.. . 15 3 

Lincoln 11 3 1 

Chattield 8 4 2 

Barte 7 7 2 

Clarke. F. L 5 9 2 

Clarke. J. B 3 7 7 

Chess — 

Hall 11 3 n 

Grier 9J 2\ 1 

McQueen 4 2 () 

Chatfield. 6 6 

Horle 2 2 

In the present tournament each player will have 

four games of chess with each other player, and n ne 



games of checkers. Ten chess players have entered 
the tournament. 

At the last meeting of the wrestling class the members 
decided to hold their meetings twice each week. 
During the absence of Fred Huber, J. W. Wilson will 
act as instructor. 

The Cristobal tenpin bowling team won two out of 
three games from Gatun on Saturday night. 

CRISTOBAL. 

At the opening meeting of the literary and debating 
club on August 23, a program was enjoyed by an audi- 
ence of over 100. Refreshments were served, the 
ladies furnishing home made cake. 

The subject for debate on September 6 is "Resolved, 
that immigration should be further restricted." 

An order for new library books will be sent to the 
States. Any one knowing of good new books is requested 
to leave the names at the office. 

The States entertainment given by the Hearons 
Sisters on Thursday night was attended by an audience 
of over 300. A return engagement,' in the form of a 
sacred concert, will be given on Sunday night, Sep- 
tember 3, at 9 p. m. This entertainment will be free 
to all. 

The following are the leaders in the local tenpin 
handicap tournament: 

Won. Lost. P. C. 

Weaver 15 3 .833 

Peterson 5 1 . 833 

Louch 19 4 .826 

Beard 17 4 .809 

Buser 9 5 .643 

Next Saturday night the opening games in the 
Isthmian tenpin league will be rolled on the Cristobal 
alleys between Culebra and Cristobal. 

The following high scores were rolled during the 
week: Tenpins — Louch, 216. 216, 200; Rigney. 208; 
Wheeler, 203; Babbitt, 210; Burgoon, J., 205; Atkins, 
200; Collins, 205, 202; Claherty, 212. Duckpins — 
Poore. 102; Louch, 106; Hess, 100. 106, 103. 



Distances on Canal Zone Roads. 

The distances along the Canal Zone Highway from 
Panama to Gorgona are. as follows: 



From 



R.R. station, Panama 



R.R. station, Panama 
R.R. station, Panama 



R.R. station, Panama 

R.R. station, Panama 
R.R. station, Panama 

R.R. station, Panama 
R.R. station, Panama 

R.R. station, Panama 

R.R. station, Panama 

East end of Empire 

suspension bridge. . 

R.R. station, Empire 
R.R. Station. Empire 



R.R. station, Empire 

Junction of the main 
highway and the 
Marines' road 
Bas Obispo station 

Junction of Sabanas 
and Corozal roads 

Junction of Sabanas 
and Corozal roads 



To 



Miles. 



Junction of road to Sa- 
banas and Corozal road . 79 

Corozal R.R. station.. . 4.03 

Junction with road lead- 
ing to Miraflores R.R. 
station 

Pedro Miguel R.R. sta- 
tion 8.94 

Church at Paraiso 10. 20 

East end of Empire sus- 
pension bridge 13. 89 

Empire R.R. station ... 14.56 

Las Cascadasroad cross 
ing near corral 

Junction with Marines' 
road to Bas Obispo' 
station i 19.00 

Gorgona R.R. station... I 21.92 

End of macadam road! 
leading to Las Cas- 
cadas plantation i 2 . 88 

End of the finished por- 1 
tion of road leading 1 
toward Chorrera. . . . ; 0.51 

End of graded portion of 1 
road leading toward 
Chorrera 1-70 

R.R. station Culebra. . . 1.20 



R.R. station. BasObispo 0. 30 

Police station, Sabanas. 2 . 37 

Zone line on Sabanas 

road 3.12 



Supplies for Canal Work. 

The following steamers, with supplies for the Isth- 
mian Canal Commission, arrived at the ports of Cris- 
tobal, and Colon, during the week ending August 26: 

Sanlona, August 21. from Baltimore, with 140 
packages filter plant material, 52 pieces structural steel, 
38 bundles steel rails, 1,580 pieces steel ties, 34 bundles 
lock material, 8 pieces lock material, 6 cases lock 
material, for Atlantic Division; 15 bundles lock material 
for Pacific Division; 9 barrels furnace castings, 126 
pieces white oak lumber, 370 pieces couplers, for 
Mechanical Division; 1,200 kegs bolts. 5,000 bundles 
tie plates, 472 barrels crushed sulphate, 70 barrels 
lump alum, 1,500 cases dynamite, for stock. 

Prinz Joachim, August 21, from New York, with 23 
pieces castings for Atlantic Division; 14 cases paper 
for stock. 

Montoso. August 22, from New York, with 89.400 
bags cement for Atlantic and Pacific Divisions. 

Abangarcz, August 24. from New Orleans, with 35 
pieces piling for A tlanticDi vision; 16 pieces steam shovel 



chains for Central Division; 10 pieces castings for 
Pacific Division; 425 pieces white oak lumber for 
Mechanical Division; 30 crates library paste. 921 bales 
hay, 23 bales duck, 125 pieces yellow pine lumber. 314 
pieces yellow pine lumber. 914 bundles ceiling lumber. 
1,693 bundles flooring lumber, for stock. 

Zacapa, August 24, from New York, with 21 cases 
tape fuse and 16 barrels glassware for stock. 

Advance. August 25, from New York, with 10 barrels 
paint. 6 cases car seals, 100 kegs spikes. 250 pieces rail 
joints, 29 bundles sheet iron, 9 cases insulated wire, 20 
pieces lumber, 12 barrels graphite, 97 pieces pig lead, 
for stock; 10 pieces steam shovel chains for Central 
Division; 7 cases dredge sleeves for Atlantic Division; 
1 70 cases glassware, 35 cases drugs and sundries, for 
Sanitary Department; and a miscellaneous cargo, the 
whole consisting of 720 packages, weighing 86 tons. 

Prinz Eitel Friedrich, August 26, from New York, 
with 236 cases blasting caps for stock. 



Married. 

BATES-DEVOL— At Culebra, C. Z., on August 24, 
the Rev. Henry Collins officiating, Lucile Scott, 
daughter of Lieutenant-Colonel and Mrs. C. A. Devol, 
to Albert G. Bates. 

ALLYN-McEWEN— At Cristobal. C. Z., on 
August 24, Laura D. McEwen of Ottawa, Kansas, to 
John C. Allyn of Springfield, Missouri, the Rev. J. L. 
Wise officiating. Canal Zone residence, Gatun. 



Rainfall from August 1 to 26 


1911, 


Inclusive. 


Stations. 


.3 

i* 

k a 
a o 

s 


V 

Q 


*rt u 


Pacific Section — 


his. 
1.94 
2.49 
2.30 
1.15 
2.13 

2.47 
1.64 
1.96 
.85 
1.59 
1.29 
1.49 
1.05 

1 70 
2.13 
1.05 
2. 11 

2 19 

4.25 
4.27 
4.27 


12 

12 

20 

9 

2 

21 
21 
21 
25 
21 
21 
19 
2 
25 
15 
25 
15 

20 

14 
14 
13 


Ins. 
6.18 
7.99 
6 36 




4.85 




7.69 


Central Section — 


7.88 


*Camacho 


7.61 
5.63 




5.96 




8.36 




9.59 




12.07 




7 35 




6.20 




7 08 




4 94 




8.68 


Atlantic Section — 


6.71 




11.34 




10.95 




t20.54 





♦Standard rain gage — readings at 5 p. m. daily. 
Automatic rain gage at unstarred stations — values 
midnight to midnight. fTo 5 p. m., August 25. 



Stages of the Chagres. 

Maximum heights of the Chagres River for the week 
ending midnight, Saturday. August 26, 1911. All 
heights are in feet above mean sea level. 







Station. 






Day and Date. 


Vigia. 


Alhajuela 


o 
E 
O 


6 

o 
a 


c: . 

03 <c 


Sun., Aug. 20. . 
Mon., Aug. 21.. 
Tues., Aug. 22 . 
Wert.. Aug. 23.. 
Thurs.. Aug. 24 
Fri.. Aug. 25.. . 
Sat., Aug. 26.. . 


129.0 
141.9 
130.6 
127.8 
127.7 
128.0 
127.9 


94.6 
103.5 
96.8 
94.5 
94.0 
94.1 
94.0 


48.2 
57.5 
57.0 
48.2 
46.8 
47.2 
47.5 


15.0 
18.8 
20.5 
17. 1 
16.7 
16.3 
16.3 


14.7 
15.3 
16.6 
16.6 
16.4 
16 
15.9 


Height of low- 
water 


125.0 


92.0 


44.0 







The following vessels arrived at, or departed from 
the port of Balboa during the week ending August 26: 

Arrivals — August 20, City of Panama, from San 
Francisco; August 21, Guatemala, from Callao; August 
22, Mackinaw, from San Francisco; Manavi, from Buen- 
aventura; Peru, from Guayaquil; August 26, Oberon, 
from Port Harford. 

Departures — August 22, Quito, to Guayaquil; 
August 23, Palena. to Valparaiso; August 24, Stanley 
Dollar, to San Francisrq; August 25, Peru, to San 
Francisco; August 26, City of Panama, to San Fran- 
cisco; Manavi, to Buenaventura. 



LOST — In Colon, or on train Xo. 73, a ladies' gold 
locket and chain with initials "E. M." Reward, if 
returned to W. D. McHenry, Gatun. 



August 30, 1911. 



THE CANAL RECORD 



OFFICIAL CIRCULARS. 



Illuminating Oils and Lubricants. 

CULEBRA, C. Z-, AugUSt IS, 1911. 

Circular No. 314-g. (Superseding Circular No. 
314-b.): 

The following list of illuminating oils, and lubricating 
oils and greases, will be considered as standard for 
the Isthmian Canal Commission and Panama Railroad 
Company, and will be used only for the purposes 
indicated, excepting only as noted in the last paragraph 
of this order. All requisitions on the Quartermaster's 
Department shall specify the oil or lubricant desired, 
either by the I.C. C. number given below, or by name, 
or by both, and no name other than that given below 
for each particular oil or lubricant shall be used in 
designating the same on requisitions, etc. No oils or 
lubricants will be requisitioned for unless the same 
are included in the following list, until after application 
for authority to procure same, showing the necessity 
therefor, has been first submitted to, and approved, 
by me. 

The metal drums in which most of the lubricating 
oils are furnished have to be returned to the oil con- 
tractor in good condition. Care should, therefore, be 
exercised in their handling to prevent both damage 
and loss of oil, and in no case should they be used as a 
continuous container for the same or any other oils, 
but, when empty, should be returned promptly to the 
Quartermaster's Department. 

The prices given below indicate the actual cost to 
the Commission and Panama Railroad Company of 
all oils and lubricants, delivered at Cristobal, under 
the present annual contract, (cost of drums not in- 
cluded) and are not intended to supersede the prices 
given in the price book of the Quartermaster's Depart- 
ment, and should not be used in the material accounts. 

I. C. C. No. I. Valve oil — For the internal lubrica- 
tion of steam valves and cylinders on all classes of 
equipment. Cost, per gallon, in drums, SO. 195. 

I. C. C. No. 2. Air compressor cylinder oil — For 
the internal lubrication of air cylinders of air compres- 
sors, and for pneumatic hammers and drills. Cost, 
per gallon, in drums, $0.15. 

1. C. C. No. 3. Marine engine oil — For marine en- 
gines, but not in crank cases, where it would be agitated 
and mixed with water, for. being a compounded oil, it 
would emulsify if so used; also for the block bearings 
of suction dredges. Cost, per gallon, in drums, $0,275. 

I. C. C. Xo. 4. Stationary engine oil — For stationary 
engines, electric dynamos, and motors, wood and metal 
working machinery, and for the general lubrication of 
machinery; also, for dies of bolt cutters, turret lathes, 
etc., except where the use of lard oil is permitted. 
(See note under lubricant No. 11.) Cost, per gallon, 
in drums, SO. 13. 

I. C. C. No. 5. Locomotive engine oil — For all loco- 
motives, running gear of all locomotive cranes, deck 
machinery of dredges (except engines.) and for cold 
saws in machine shops. Cost, per gallon, in drums, 
SO. 11. 

I. C. C. No. 6. Turbine engine oil — For all step 
bearings of turbines in the Mirafiores and Gatun 
power plants only. This oil is also known as step 
bearing oil. Cost, per gallon, in drums, SO. 13. 

I. C. C. No. 7. Gas engine oil — For the cylinders of 
internal combustion engines. Cost, per gallon, in 
drums, $0.23. 

I. C. C. No. 8. Weslinghouse crank case oil — For use 
in the crank cases of Westinghouse vertical compound 
engines only. Cost, per gallon, in cans, $0.20. 

I. C. C. No. 9. Car oil — For the journals of all cars, 
passenger coaches, locomotive tenders, and rolling 
stock generally; for steam shovel bearings where not 
equipped with grease cups, and for tripod drills and 
switches. Cost, per gallon, in drums, $0. 10. 

I. C. C. No. 10. Transformer oil — For use in the 
electrical subdivision in aircooled transformers only. 
Cost, per gallon, in drums. $0.28. 

I. C. C. No. 11. Lard oil — For hand torches for 
illuminating purposes only on marine equipment. On 
land, for shop use on pipe-threading machines; and it 
may be substituted for stationary engine oil (I. C. C 
Xo. 4.) when necessary, on dies of turret machines and 
on bolt cutters, when working refined iron or tough 
machinery steel. The use of this oil should be minimized 
to the greatest possible extent on account of its high 
cost. Cost, per gallon, in cans. $0.80. 

I. C. C. No. 12. Ammonia cylinder oil — For the in- 
ternal lubrication of cylinders of ammonia compressors 
only. Cost, per gallon, in drums. $0.35. 

I. C. C. No. 13. Crude oil — For the lubrication of 
steam shovel chains, cables, where designated, and 
general purposes where oils and greases have been 
used as a preservative. Cost, per gallon, in barrels 
$0.0262. 

LUBRICATING GREASES. 

I. C. C. No. 20. Nonliquid oil — This is an oil of 
the consistency of vaseline, for the lubrication of 
sheaves of carriages on the Lidgerwood cableways at 



Gatun. for air brake cylindrs, and triple valves, and 
such pneumatic drills and motors as may be equipped 
for the use of grease. Cost, per pound , in barrels, $0.05. 

I. C. C. No. 21. Cup grease (yellow) — For all classes 
of lubrication where grease is used in compression cups. 
This grease is being received in two consistencies. 
No. 3 and No. 5, the No. 3 of lesser consistency to be 
used on machinery subject to normal temperature, 
and the No. 5 of heavier consistency to be used on 
machinery subject to higher temperatures. Cost, per 
pound, in cans, $0.06. 

I. C. C. No. 22. Gear grease — For all classes of lubri- 
cation requiring grease for which compression cups are 
not adapted. This includes the center and side 
bearings of cars, cranes, and steam shovels, also wire 
cables, both standing and running, etc. Cost, per 
pound, in cans, $0.0275. 

I. C. C. No. 23. Cable greast — For the "Interlocked- 
wire" track cables of the Gatun cableways exclusively- 
Cost, per pound, in barrels, $0.0275. 

I. C. C. No. 24. Crank pin grease — For use on loco- 
motive crank pins only where pressure cups are used. 
Care should be exercised not to confound this grease 
with cup grease Nos. 3 and 5, (I. C. C. No. 21.) which 
is not suitable for this purpose. Cost per pound, in 
barrels. $0.0525. 

ILLUMINATING OILS. 

I. C. C. No. 30. Signal oil — For use in railroad 
lanterns only, and in the cab lights of engines. Cost, 
per gallon, in cans. $0.37. 

I. C. C. No. 31. Keroseneoil — For use in locomotive 
headlights, passenger coach, and similar lamps, ordinary 
lanterns, and for cleaning purposes. Cost, per gallon, 
in drums. $0.1008; in cans, S0.1735. 

GASOLINE. 

I. C. C. Xo. 40. Gasoline — For use on gasoline 
launches, motor cars, blow torches, cleaning, etc. Cost, 
per gallon, in drums, $0.1863; in cans. $0.2590. 

Standard hand oilers and oil cans should be used as 
provided in circular Xo. 338. 

A copy of this circular shall be posted in all stationary 
plants, shops, engine houses, storehouses, oil houses, 
on all marine equipment, and in such other places as 
may be necessary to insure the cognizance of same by 
all concerned. 

Substitutions of cheaper grades of the standard 
I. C. C. and P. R. R. lubricants given above, may be 
approved by the traveling engineers, wherever practi- 
cable, the above circular defining in a general way 
their accepted uses. 

Geo. W. Goethals. 
Chairman, Isthmian Canal Commission. 
President, Panama Railroad Company. 



Inspector of Fuel and Lubricants. 

CULEBRA, C. Z., AugUSt 21. 1911. 

Circular No. 266-h: 

Effective this date, Mr. James E. Johnson is ap- 
pointed inspector of fuel and lubricant consumption, 
and, as such, will report directly to the Assistant to 
the Chief Engineer. Geo. \Y. Goethals. 

Chairman. Isthmian Canal Commission. 
President. Panama Railroad Company. 



Waste of Coal in Unloading. 

Culebra. C. Z., August 23, 1911. 

Circular No. 402: 

Waste of coal resulting from unloading it directly 
on the ground at different points on the Isthmus is an 
appreciable item, and should be minimized by exer- 
cising due care, and, wherever possible, by providing 
a floor of old wood or metal material on which to 
unload it. Scattered piles of unused coal should in all 
cases be cleaned up and utilized as the work proceeds. 
Geo. W. Goethals, 
Chairman, Isthmian Canal Commission. 
President. Panama Railroad Company. 



Charges Against Employes. 

Culebra. C. Z. August 25, 1911. 
Circular No. 403: 

Any employe, against whom charges of any kind are 
made, shall be permitted to be present during any- 
formal hearing or investigation conducted where the 
testimony of witnesses is heard by a board or official, 
and to call or cross-examine witnesses. 

Geo. W. Goethals. 
Chairman, Isthmian Canal Commission. 
President, Panama Railroad Company. 



Shop Expense Percentage. 

Culebra. C. Z.. August 24. 1911 
Heads of Departments and Divisions: 

In accordance with the provisions of circular Xo. 
169-E. the following shop expense percentage for each 
shop is hereby fixed, effective September 1, 1911, and 
will be applied, until further orders, to the distributed 



labor used in all shop work, in accordance with the 
provisions of circular Xo. 264-A, viz.: 

Division or Shop. Shop expense 

per centum. 

Mechanical Division 37.5 

Empire shop 30 

Drydock shop 45 

Balboa shop 25 

Porto Eello 20 

Circular letter from this office dated May 5. 1911, 
is revoked. Geo. W. Goethals. 

Chairman and Chief Engineer. 



Oil Cans. 

Culebra, C. Z., August 24. 1911. 
Circular Xo. 338-b: 

The following additions and amendments to circular 
No. 33S are hereby approved for the guidance of all 
concerned : 

No. 40. Twenty-four-inch spring hand oiler (stand- 
ard locomotive type) for use on locomotives and steam 
shovels only. Capacity, 2 pints. 

No. 47. Eighteen-inch spring hand oiler (same type 
and material as No. 40). for use on dredges, cranes, 
cableways, and smaller equipment than locomotives 
and steam shovels. 

Requisitions for the above will be honored only 
after approval by the traveling engineers. 

Geo. W. Goethals, 
Chairman, Isthmian Canal Commission. 
President, Panama Railroad Company. 



Standard Coal Scoop. 

Culebra, C. Z., August 25, 1911. 
Circular No. 404: 

Hereafter, the No. 3 scoop will be adopted as the 
standard for use of firemen on all coal-burning plant 
and equipment, and in all stationary plants where 
coal is used as fuel. Future requisitions for the purchase 
of scoops in the United States for this purpose shall 
specify the No. 3 scoop. 

Geo. W. Goethals. 
Chairman, Isthmian Canal Commission. 
President, Panama Railroad Company. 



Care in Unloading Coal Cars. 

Culebra. C. Z.. August 25. 1911. 
Circular No. 405: 

My attention has been invited to the fact that coal 
is being left on the ends of cars when unloading them. 
This is an uneconomical practice, and should be dis- 
continued. It is directed that hereafter in the unloading 
of coal cars, coal be removed from the ends as well as 
from the body of the cars, and failure to do this will 
render the employe or employes responsible liable to 
a suspension of from one to five days for each offence. 
Heads of departments and divisions will be expected 
to see that this order is enforced. 

Geo. W. Goethals, 
Chairman and Chief Engineer. 



Misdirected Letters. 

Ancon, C Z.. August 30, 1911. 
The following insufficiently addressed letters, origi- 
nating in the United States and its possessions, have 
been received in the office of the Director of Posts, and 
may be secured upon request of the addressee: 

LETTERS UNCALLED FOR AUGUST 23. 

Barte, Geo. A. Mover, Jannie 

Corbett, James B. (2d class) Stafford. Percy F. 

Dakin. L. W. Walton, Geo. ■ 

Demuth, Mrs. Ed. Wheadren. Thomas 

Greame. Miss Lucv (pkg.) Whitsel, F. W. (2d class) 

Hollinger, A. E. (2) Wilkins. John 
Jones. J. W. 

LETTERS UNCALLED FOR AUGUST 30. 

Arner, Otto McEvers, Mrs. Kado 

Cochran, Richard L. St. John. S.W. 

Dumetz. Geneva Seymour, MissMildred R. 

Dwver, John Charles Sims. L. C. 

Fisher. John Treiner, J. G. 

Froehlick. Henry Tremaine, Paul H. 

Froman, Oliver Turner. \V. A. 

Graham. Inez Wheeler, Willtaro 
Kinner. Millmer 



Tide Table. 

The following table shows the time of high and low 
tides at Panama for the week ending September 6. 
1911. (75th meridian time): 



Date. 


Low. 


High. 


Low. 


High. 


Low. 


September 1 - . . . 
September 2 . . . . 
September 3 . . . . 


A.M. 
2.30 
3.20 
4.25 
5.35 


A.M. 
8.29 
9.15 
10. 15 
11.30 

12.40 
1.40 
2.20 


P.M. 
3.00 
3.55 
5.00 
6 10 


P.M. 

8.58 
10.00 
11.15 


P.M. 


A.M. 
6.47 
7.45 
8.30 


12.45 
1.45 
2.30 


7.10 
8.03 
8.45 



THE CANAL RECORD 



Vol. V., No. 1. 



CANAL DIRECTORY. 

ISTHMIAN CANAL COMMISSION. 

Col. Geo. W. Goethals, U. S. A., Chair- 
man, Culebra. 

Col. H. F. Hodges, U. S. A., Culebra. 

Lieut. -Col. D. D. Gaillard, U. S. A., Empire. 

Lieut. -Col. Wm. L. Sibert, U. S. A., Gatun. 

Civil Engineer H. H. Rousseau, U. S. N., 
Culebra. 

Col. W. C. Gorgas, U. S. A., Ancon. 

Mr. Maurice H. Thatcher, Ancon. 
Mr. Joseph Bucklin Bishop, 

Secretary, Ancon. 

DEPARTMENTS. 

Construction and Engineering. 

Headquarters. Culebra. 
Col. Geo. W. Goethals, Chairman and Chief 
Engineer. 

William Howard May. Secretary to the 
Chairman. 
C. A. Mcllvaine. Chief Clerk. 
John K. Baxter. Assistant Chief Clerk. 
Ad Faure. Chief Accountant. 
H. S. Farish, Surveying Officer. 
Caleb M. Saville. Assistant Engineer. 

Col. H. F. Hodges, AssistantChief Engineer. 
C. O. Carlson. Secretary. 
Edward Schildhauer, Electrical and Mechanical 

Engineer. 
Henry Goldmark, L. D. Cornish, T. B. Mon- 

niche. Designing Engineers. 
Walter F. Beyer. Assistant Engineer. 

Civil Engineer H. H. Rousseau, Assistant 
to thediief Engineer. 

J. C. Parsons, Secretary. 
Maj.T. C Dickson, U. S. A.. Inspector of Shops. 
A. B. Nichols. Office Engineer. 
James G Craig, Senior Traveling Engineer. 
D. E. Irwin, Junior Traveling Engineer. 

Central Division. 

Headquarters, Empire. 
Lieut. -Col. D. D. Gaillard, Division Engi- 
neer. 

W I Beam. Chief Clerk. 
A. E. Bronk. General Inspector. 
A. S. Zinn, Resident Engineer. 
Mark W. Tenny, Assistant Engineer. 
J. W. Sneed, Superintendent Construction. 
J. M. Hagan, Superintendent Construction. 
Joseph Little. Superintendent Construction. 
W. T. Reynolds. Superintendent Construction. 
A. Sessions. Superintendent Transportation. 
William H Bates. Supt. Steam Shovel Repairs. 
Dan E. Wright, Supt. Municipal Work and 

Pipe Lines. 

Atlantic Division. 
Headquarters. Gatun. 
Lieut. -Col. Wm. L. Sibert, Division Engi- 
neer. 

Maj. Chester Harding. U. S. A.. Assistant Divi- 
sion Engineer. 

( ) Chief Clerk. 

Maj. J. P. Jervey. U. S. A.. Resident Engineer. 
Maj. G. M. Hoffman. U. S. A., Resident En- 
gineer. 
Geo. M. Wells. Office Engineer. 

Pacific Division. 

Headquarters, Corozal. 
S. B. Williamson, Division Engineer. 

John M. G. Watt. Assistant Division Engineer. 

J. C. Keller, Chief Clerk. 
W. G. Comber. Resident Engineer. 
H. O. Cole, Resident Engineer. 
Frank Cotton. Assistant Engineer. 
H. D. Hinman. Assistant Engineer. 
W. L Thompson. Assistant Engineer. 
James Macfarlane. Supt. of Dredging. 

Mechanical Division. 

Headquarters. Gorgona. 
A. L. Robinson, Superintendent. 
William Taylor, Chief Clerk. 
Henry Schoellhorn. Mechanical Engineer. 

Subsistence. 

Headquarters, Cristobal. 
Maj. Eugene T. Wilson, U. S. A., Subsistence 
Officer. 

Capt. Frank O. Whitlock. U. S. A.. Assistant 

Subsistence Officer. 
John Burke, Manager of Commissaries. 
W. F Shipley. Chief Clerk. 

Quartermaster's. 
Headquarters. Culebra. 
Lieut.-Col. C. A. Devol, U. S. A., Chief 
Quartermaster. 

Capt K. K. Wood. U. S. A. 

Quartermaster. 
Lieut Walter D. Smith, U. S. 
Quartermaster. 1 
C. H. Mann. Chief Clerk. 



Capt. C. Nixon, U. S. A., Depot Quartermaster, 
Mount Hope. 

C. L- Parker, Assistant Depot Quartermaster. 
Mount Hope. 

Chas. R. Bryon. Storekeeper, Gatun. 
R. K. Morris, Storekeeper, Gorgona. 

D. H. BeaniHn, Storekeeper. Empire. 

C. A. Gilmaitin, Storekeeper. Miraflores. 
X. D. Holt, Storekeeper. Balboa. 

District Quartermasters. 

B. C. Poole. Ancon and Balboa. 

J. H. K. Hunphreys. Corozal and Miraflores. 

J. T. Smith. Pedro Miiruel and Paraiso. 

H. F. Sedwick. Culebra. 

W. G. Ross. Empire. 

J. M. King, Las Cascadas and Bas Obispo. 

R C. Shady. Gorgona. 

O. S. Farrar. San Pablo, Mamei. Taberuilla 

and Bohio. 
R. M Gamble. Gatun. 
Roy R. Watson. Cristobal, Toro Point, and 

Nombre de Dios. 
Chas. D. Morgan. P orto Bello, 

Civil Administration. 

Headquarters. Ancon. 
Maurice H. Thatcher, Head of the Depart- 
ment. 

G. A. Ninas. Chief Clerk. 
C. L. Luedtke, Assistant Chief Clerk. 
Tom M. Cooke. Chief. Division of Posts, Cus- 
toms and Revenues, Ancon. 
Arthur McGown. Deputy Collector. Ancon. 
Jno. L. Storla. Deputy Collector, Cristobal. 
J. P. Fyffe, Chief of Police. Ancon. 
Capt. Chas. W. Barber, I". S. A.. Assistant Chief 
of Police. Ancon. 

C. E. Weidman. Fire Chief, Cristobal. 

Chas. F. Koerner, Assistant Fire Chief. Cris- 
tobal 

M. E. Gilmore, Supt. Public Works. Ancon. 

J. J. Reidy. Asst. Supt Public Works. Colon. 

F. A. Cause. Superintendent of Schools. Ancon. 

Edgar P. Beck.Treasurer of Canal Zone. Empire, 

W. G. Comber. Chairman; James Macfarlane. 
C. J. Anderson. Board of Local Inspectors. 

Canal Zone Judiciary. 

Headquarters. Ancon. 
Supreme Court— H. A. Gudger, Chief Justice. 
Walter Emery, Clerk, Ancon. 
Thomas E. Brown, Jr.. Associate Justice. 
Circuit Court, First Circuit— H. A. Gudger, 
Judge. Ancon. 

Walter Emery, Clerk. 

Circuit Court. Second Circuit — ( ) 

Elbert M. Goolsby. Clerk. 
Circuit Court. Third Circuit— Thomas E- 
Brown, Jr. 
Nelson R. Johnson, Clerk. Cristobal 
William H. Jackson. Senior District Judge. 

Ancon. 
M. C. Rerdell. District Judge, Cristobal. 
S. E. Blackburn, District Judge. Ancon. 
Edgar S. Garrison, District Judge, Empire. 
J. B. March. District Judge. Gorgona. 

Law. 

Headquarters, Ancon. 
Frank Feuille, Counsel and Chief Attorney. 
William K. Jackson, Prosecuting Attorney. 
Chas R. Williams, Assistant Prosecuting At- 
torney. 
A. A. Greenman . Land A gent. 

Sanitation. 

Headquarters, Ancon. 
Col. W. C. Gorgas, Chief Sanitary Officer. 

Lieut.-Col. John L. Phillips, U. S. A.. Assistant 

Chief Sanitary Officer. 
Dr. M. E. Connor, General Inspector. 
Harry E. Bovay, Chief Clerk. 

Lieut.-Col. Charles F. Mason. U. S. A.. Superin- 
tendent Ancon Hospital. Ancon. 

Surgeon Wm. H. Bell. U. S. N., Superintendent 
Colon Hospital, Cristobal. 

Surgeon J. C. Perry, P. H. and M. H. S.. Chief 
Quarantine Officer, and Health Officer, Pan- 
ama. 

Surgeon -Claude C. Pierce, P. H. and M. H. S. 
Quarantine Officer. Colon. 

Dr. Fleetwood Gruver, P. Hand M.H.S., Quar- 
antine Officer, Panama. 

Joseph A. LePrince. Chief Sanitary Inspector. 
Ancon. 

Dr. A. E. Mayner . Health Officer, Colon. 

Disbursements. 

Headquarters, Empire. 
Edward J. Williams, Disbursing Officer. 

Wr.i. M. Wood, Assistant Disbursing Officer. 

J. P. Waldrop, Cashier. 

C. C. Metealf, Paymaster, Ancon. 

C. E. Gilmore, Paymaster, Cristobal. 



Capt. Courtland Nixon, Purchasing Agent on 
the Isthmus. 

Maj. Wendell L.Simpson. U. S. A., Assistant 
purchasing Officer. 24 State Street. New York 
City. 

Cant. F. H, Lawtnu. U. S. A., Assistant Pur- 
chasing Agent. 614 Whitney-Central Building, 
New Orleans, La. 

Panama Railroad Company. 

Headquarters, Colon. 
(General offices. 24 State Stieet, New York.) 
J. A. Smith, General Superintendent, Colon, 
R. L. Mock. Chief Clerk. 
Lieut. Frederick Mears. U. S. A., Chief Engineer. 
A. K. Stone, Master of Transportation. 



II 



Assistant Chief 
A., Constructing 



Examination of Accounts. 

Headquarters, Empire. 
A. A. Smith, Examiner of Accounts. 
T. L- Clear, Assistant Examiner of Accounts. 

Purchasing Department. 

Headquarters. Washington. D. C. 
Maj. F. C. Boggs, U. S. A., General Pur- 
chasing Officer. 

C. E. Dole, Chief Clerk. 



MOVEMENT OF OCEAN VESSELS. 



The following is a list of the sailings of the Panama 
Railroad Steamship Company; of the Royal Mail 
Steam Packet Company; of the Hamburg-American 
Line, and of the United Fruit Company's Line; the 
Panama Railroad Company's dates being subject to 
changes 

NEW YORK TO CRISTOBAL. 



Colon 


.P. R. R.. 


.Thursday.. 


.Aug. 24 


Cristobal 


. P. R. R. . 


.Tues lay. . 


.Aug, 29 


AUianca 


.P. R. R.. 


.Wednesday. Aug. 30 


Panama 


.P. R. R.. 


.Tuesday.. . 


.Sept 5 


Advance 


.P. R. R.. 


.Monday. .. 


.Sept. 11 


Colon 


. P. R. R.. 


. Monday. . . 


Sept. 18 


Allianca 


P. R. R.. 


.Saturday. . 


.Sept. 23 


Panama 


.P. R. R.. 


. Friday .... 


Sept. 29 


Advance 


.P. R. R.. 


.Thursday.. 


.Oct. 5 


Colon 


.P. R. R.. 


.Thursday.. 


.Oct. 1- 


Allianca 


.P. R. R.. 


.Wednesday. Oct. 18 


CRISTOBAL TO NEW YORK. 




Advance 


.P. R. R.. 


. Wednesday 


.Aug. 30 


Colon 


.P. R. R.. 


.Tuesday.. . 


. Sept. 5 


Allianca 


.P. R. R.. 


. Monday. . . 


. Sept. 1 1 


Panama 


.P. R. R.. 


. Sunday . . . 


.Sept. 17 


Advance 


.P. R. R.. 


, Saturday. . 


.Sept. 23 


Colon 


.P. R. R.. 


.Saturday. . 


.Sept. 30 


Allianca 


.P. R. R.. 




Oct. 6 


Panama 


.P. R. R.. 


.Thursday.. 


.Oct. 12 


Advance 


. .P. R. R.. 


.Tuesday.. . 


.Oct. 17 


Colon 


, .P. R. R.. 


.Tuesday. . 


..Oct. 24 


Allianca 


. . P. R. R.. 


. Monday. . 


. . Oct. 30 


NEW YORK TO COLON. 




Almirante 


. .U. F. C. 


.Thursday.. 


.Aug. 24 


Prinz Aug. Wilhelm. . 


. H.-A 


.Saturday. 


.Aug. 26 


Santa Marta 


. . U. F. C . 


.Thursday.. 


.Aug. 31 


Prinz Sigismund 


..H.-A 




Sept. 1 


Oruba 


. .R. M.. .. 


.Saturday. 


..Sept. 2 


Metapan 


. .U. F. C. 


.Thursday. 


.Sept. 7 


Prinz Joachim 


..H.-A.... 


.Saturday. 


..Sept. 9 


Zacapa 


. .U. F. C. 


.Thursday. 


. .Sept. 14 


Prinz Eitel Friedrich. 


..H.-A.... 




Sept. 15 


Magdalena 


.R. M.... 


.Saturday. 


..Sept. 16 


Almirante 


. .U.F. C. 


.Thursday. 


..Sept. 21 


COLON TO NEW YORK. 




Zacapa 


. .U. F. C. 


.Thursday. 


..Aug. 31 


Prinz Eitel Friedrich. 


..H.-A 


.Saturday. 


..Sept. 2 


Magdalena 


,.R. M.... 


.Tuesday.. 


. . Sept. 5 


Almirante 


..U.F. C. 


.Thursday. 


..Sept. 7 


Prinz Aug. Wilhelm. . 


..H.-A.... 


.Tuesday... 


. .Sept. 12 


Santa Marta 


..U.F. C. 


.Thursday. 


. .Sept. 14 


Prinz Sigismund 


..H. A... 


.Saturday. 


..Sept. 16 


Clyde 


..R.M... 


..Tuesday. . 


..Sept. 19 


Metapan 


. . U. F. C 


. .Thursday. 


..Sept. 21 


Prinz Joachim 


..H.-A... 


. .Tuesday. . 


.Sept. 26 


Zacapa 


...U.F. C. 


.Thursday. 


..Sept. 28 


Prinz Eitel Frederich. 


..H.A... 


. .Saturday. 


..Sept. 30 


NEW ORLEANS TO COLON. 




Atenas 


..U.F. C 


.Saturday. 


. .Aug. 26 


Turrialba 


..U. F. C 


, .Saturday. 


..Sept. 2 


Abangarez 


..U. F. C 


. .Saturday. 


..Sept. 9 


Atenas 


..U. F. C 


.Saturday. 


..Sept. 16 


Turrialba 


..U. F. C 


. .Saturday. 


. .Sept. 23 



COLON TO NEW ORLEANS. 

Abangarez U. F. C. .Thursday.. .Aug. 31 

Atenas U. F. C . .Thursday.. .Sept. 7 

Turrialba U. F. C . .Thursday.. .Sept. 14 

Abangarez U. F. C . .Thursday.. .Sept. 21 

Hamburg- American steamers leave Colon for New 
York via Kingston at 10 a. m. on sailing dates. The 
Prinz August Wilhelm and Prinz Joachim call at 
Santiago de Cuba, on both outward and homeward 
voyages. 

Royal Mail steamers leave for New York on alter- 
nate Tuesdays, at 10 a. m.; for Southampton on alter- 
nate Tuesdays at 10 a. m. 

United Fruit Company's ships for New Orleans 
direct leave on Thursdays at 3 p. in.; ships for New 
York via Kingston on Thursdays at 11 a. m.; for 
Bocaa del Toro on Mondays at 6 p.m. 



CANAL 




RECORD 



Volume V. 



ANCON, CANAL ZONE, WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 6, 1911. 



No. 2. 



The Canal Record 

Published weekly under the authority and supervision of 
the Isthmian Canal Commission. 



The Canal Record is issued free of charge, one copy 
each, to all employes of the Commission and Panama 
Railroad Company whose names are on the gold roll. 
Extra copies and back numbers can be obtained from the 
news stands of the Panama Railroad Company for fire 
cents each. 

Address all Communications 

THE CANAL RECORD, 

Ancon, Canal Zone, 

Isthmus of Panama. 

No communication , cither for publication or requesting 
information, will receive attention unless signed with the 
full name and address of the writer. 

NOTES OF PROGRESS. 



Naos Island Breakwater. 

The board appointed by the Chief Engineer 
on July 8, consisting of Messrs. S. B William- 
son, \Y. G. Comber, M. W Tenny, and W. T. 
Reynolds has submitted the following report, 
the recommendation in which has been 
adopted: 

"The outer end of the filling is now 
(August 12) 4,200 feet from the island, and 
the trestle work extends 1,500 feet beyond, 
leaving an opening of 2,700 feet between the 
end of the trestle and the island. Two plans 
for completing the work were discussed, as 
follows : 

"First — To drive a trestle parallel to, and 
about 300 feet west of, the present structure, 
swinging the former onto the axis of the break- 
water after clearing the trestle now in posi- 
tion, and continuing along said axis to the 
island; the idea being that filling the present 
trestle may continue, while at the same time, 
trains may be run out to the end of the pro- 
posed trestle and filling begun from the island 
after sufficient material has been dumped along 
the line of the new trestle to make it perfectly 
secure. 

"The second plan contemplates the con- 
struction of a double trestle, similar to that 
employed in the construction of Toro Point 
breakwater. ***** It is proposed to first fill 
on both sides of the structure for its entire 
length up to mean tide, using Lidgerwood 
trains, then begin at the outer or island end, 
to fill from mean tide to full height. 

"In both plans it is proposed that rock, 
dredged from the Canal channel by the Pacific 
Division, shall be deposited in front of the 
trestle, so as to form a base about 200 feet 
wide, and that the trestle constructed in 
future shall be of a better type than that 
driven previously. 

"The board believes that the second 
method is preferable and the most economical, 
and, if adopted, will reduce the time required 
for completion under the present method by 
approximately one-half. 

"It is further thought that the additional 



width and improvement in the type of trestle 
will materially increase its stability. This 
opinion seems to be borne out by the experi- 
ence so far at Toro Point, where there is about 
the same average depth of soft material. 
The report of Mr. Vandeburgh of October 14, 
1909, seems to indicate that the material at 
the Naos Island breakwater is softer, and 
contains a smaller proportion of sand than 
that along the site of the Toro Point break- 
water. The board, however, is not convinced 
that this is proved conclusively by Mr. 
Vandeburgh's test, because the pipe used for 
collecting the samples was so arranged that 
it probably gathered samples from the surface* 
in most cases. It is also noted that the worst 
slips on the dike took place where the samples 
showed sand only, and the penetration of 
the pipe was small. 

"Attention is especially invited to the pro- 
posed method of filling in the second plan, 
viz.: To first fill the entire length to about 
mean tide, then complete the filling from the 
outer end. This is recommended, because 
experience has shown that there is no move- 
ment of the trestle until filling above mean 
tide is begun. The filling below mean tide 
will increase the stability of the trestle, and, 
if subsequent filling is begun from the outer 
end, train service will not be interrupted, 
even though there be a movement of the 
structure at the point of filling. 

"The board has the honor to recommend 
the second plan, viz.: The use of a double 
trestle, and suggests that the filling of the 
1,500 feet of trestle now in place be continued, 
as heretofore, which will require about five 
months, and that in the meantime, the neces- 
sary material be obtained and a double 
trestle started from the outer end of the 
present structure, and continued to Naos 
Island. *****." 

Both the Pacific and Central Divisions have 
begun work on the plan outlined in the 
recommendation of the board. 



Rainy Season Record in Culebra Cut. 

The total excavation in the Central Divi- 
sion for the month of August, was 1,464,294 
cubic yards, of which 1,442,402 cubic yards 
were taken from the Culebra section. This 
is the greatest amount of material ever 
removed from the Culebra section in any 
month of the rainy season since the com- 
mencement of the work by the United States. 

Previous August records of excavation in 
the Culebra section are, as follows: 

1911—1,442,402 cubic yards. 

1910 — 1,377,714 cubic yards. 

1909—1,173.370 cubic yards. 

1908—1,171,927 cubic yards. 



Regiment of Infantry for Canal Zone. 

A regiment of United States infantry will 
leave Galveston, Texas, on or about Sep- 
tember 12, and will arrive in the Canal Zone 
about eight days later. It will go into tempo- 



ran,- camp near Las Cascadas. Two old 
labor camps, consisting of old French barracks, 
have been fitted up for the enlisted men, with 
Standee bunks two tiers high, and a separate 
mess for each of the twelve companies. Two 
battalions will be stationed at the old White- 
house labor camp, and one at the Las Cascadas 
labor camp. The building formerly used by 
the Central Division as a time office will be 
the office of the commanding officer. The 
officers will be quartered in two type-18, and 
one type-16, bachelor quarters in Las Cas- 
cadas village The present complement of the 
regiment is 816 men and 50 officers. A bat- 
talion of U. S. Marines has been stationed 
in the Canal Zone since 1904. 



Chartered Vessel for P. R. R. Service. 
The steamer Lcd'is Luckenbach, 3,905 gross 
tons, has completed its first voyage from 
Philadelphia to Cristobal and return, as a 
ship of the Panama railroad sen-ice. It was 
chartered from the original charterers. Bates 
& Chesebrough of the California-Atlantic 
line on June 29, at the rate of $8,712.50 a 
month, and arrived at Colon on its first 
voyage with a full cargo of 6,000 tons on 
August 1. It sailed on the return voyage on 
August 18. The charter runs for six months. 



Two Years of Lock Building in the Pacific Division. 

Concrete construction in the locks at Pedro 
Miguel was begun on September 1, 1909, two 
years ago last Friday, and, at the close of 
work on that date, there had been laid a total 
of 705,698 cubic yards, place measurement, 
leaving still to be placed 149,803 cubic 
yards. During the first year of operations 
there were laid 261,964 cubic yards, and, 
during the second year, 443,734 cubic yards, 
place measurement. 

From the date of beginning up to July 6, 
1910, concrete was produced by small mixers 
stationed in the lock pit. and by two auxiliary 
2-cubic yard mixers, situated on the east and 
west banks of the locks, respectively. On the 
latter date, the two bcrm cranes, and three 
of the chamber cranes of the permanent 
handling plant, were placed in operation, and, 
by the following month, all the units were 
working. 

During the past year, the concrete work 
has been principally confined to the building 
of the center and side walls, which are now 
practically completed, and the general work 
had so far advanced by May 20 of the present 
year as to permit of the dismantling of a 
part of the construction plant. Two berm 
cranes and two chamber cranes have been 
taken down and reerected at Miraflores. The 
two chamber cranes remaining at Pedro 
Miguel are mainly used in lifting the iron 
work and other heavy material into place, 
although a small portion of the concrete out- 
put is handled by them when it is advanta- 
geous to do so. The mixing plant now consists 
of three 2 -cubic yard, and three i-cubic yard 



10 



THE CANAL RECORD 



Vol. V., No., 2. 



NOTES OF PROGRESS. 



(Continued.) 



mixers. Part of their output is dumped directly 
into the forms, and part is conveyed into 
place by locomotive cranes and derricks. 

The work has been performed in 8-hour 
working days, and the amount of concrete 
placed by months from the beginning of the 
work on September 1, 1909, to September 1, 
1911, was, as follows: 



Months. 



January. . . 
February. . 
March .... 

April 

May 

June 

July 

August. . . . 
September. 
October . . . 
November. 
December . 



Total 33.856 1 444.947 



1909. 



Cu. Yds. 



2,370 
8,310 
10,169 
13.007 



1910. | 1911. 



Cu. Yds. 
16,273 
13.218 
18,793 
24.522 
29,576 
30,631 
41,464 
51,264 
50,702 
61,422 
64,248 
42,834 



Cu. Yds. 
38.513 
37.011 
44,716 
28,635 
19,135 
18.243 
19,906 
*20,736 



226.895 



*A11 the above figures, except for August, are based 
on place measurement. 

The concrete remaining to be laid consists' 
principally of wing wall construction, the 
building of the north center guide wall, the 
completion of the south center guide wall, 
construction of Stoney buttresses, and the 
arch in the east wall, the arches in the center 
and west wall having been practically fin- 
ished. The distribution of the concrete yet 
to be placed, by cubic yards, is about as 
follows: 



Location. 



Above upper guard gale — 

East wall 

West wall 

Center wall 

Floors 

Northeast wing wall 

Northwest wing wall. . . . 

Upper center guide wall. 
Below upper guard gale — 

East wall 

West wall 

Center wall 

Southeast wing wall 

Southwest wing wall. . . . 

Center guide wall 



Total . 



Grand total. 



Cu. Yds. 
12,532 
10,351 
24.030 
7,228 
14.600 
14,600 



7,063 
2,599 
3.418 



Rein- 
forced. 



Cu. Yds. 
205 
235 
220 



26.000 

52 

531 

402 

3,765 

507 



31,917 



149.803 



The concrete work at Miraflores Locks was 
begun in May, 1910, and the amounts 
laid, by months, up to September 1, follows: 



Months. 



January. . . 
February. . 
March .... 

April 

May 

June 

July 

August. . . . 
September. 
October . . . 
November. 
December . 



Total . 



1910. 



Cu. Yds. 



27 

1,603 

3.672 

6.030 

18.133 

22,159 

23,871 

21,533 



97,02 



1911. 



Cu. Yds. 
24,018 
20,896 
31,173 
38,758 
36,154 
26,536 
32,840 
*60,9S4 



271.329 



♦Bucket measurement; all other figures based on 
place measurement. 

The total amount of concrete la : d at the 
Pedro Miguel and Mirarlores locks from the 
date of beginning up to August 1, place 
measurement, is as follows: 

PEDRO MIGUEL LOCKS. 



YEAR. 

1909 

1910 

1911, to August 1 
Total 



Cubic Yards. 
33.856 
444,947 
206,159 

684.962 



MIRAFLORES LOCKS. 

1910 97,028 

1911. to August 1 210,375 

Total 307,403 

Grand total 992,365 

The total amount of concrete laid at Pedro 



Miguel Locks in August was 20,736 cubic 
yards, and at Miraflores Locks, 60,954 cubic 
yards, bucket measurement, making the 
grand total of concrete laid in the Pacific 
Division locks to September 1 about 
1,074,055 cubic yards. 



CONCRETE WORK IN THE LOCKS. 



About 63 per cent of the concrete for all the locks is in place, the amount at the close of 
the work on September 2, being 2,675,008 cubic yards, out of a total of approximately 4,199,400. 
A total of 32,879 cubic yards of concrete was laid in the locks during the week ending Sep- 
tember 2. 

GATUN LOCKS. 

Over 78 per cent of the concrete for the system of three twin locks at Gatun has been 
laid, the amount : n place at the c'ose of work on September 2, being 1,570,846 cubic yards, 
out of a total of 2,000,000 A statement of the amount of concrete placed in the locks each 
working day for the week ending September 2, and of the total, follows; and a s mi'ar statement 
for the work in the Spil'way of Gatun Dam is published elsewhere in this ;ssue. The con- 
struction plant works 12 hours daily, and the auxiliary plant 9 hours. 





Construction Plant. 
2-cubic yard mixers. 


Auxiliary Plant. 
2-cubic yard mixers 


Large 
stone. 






Concrete Hours 
placed. ( worked. 


No. of 

mixers 


Concrete 

placed. 


Hours 
worked. 


No. of 
mixers 






Cu. Yds. 
1,854 
1,578 
1,696 
2,024 
1.768 
1.764 


34.54 
23.54 
27.52 
32.26 
27.06 
27.50 


8 
8 
6 
6 
6 
4 


Cu. Yds. 
440 
496 
380 
420 
292 
500 
392 


7.40 | 2 
8.40 2 


Cu. Yds. 
124 
136 
114 
158 
94 
108 


Cu. Yds. 
2,418 




2,210 




7.40 
7.40 
6.40 
8.40 


2 
2 
2 
2 


2,190 




2,602 




2.154 




2,372 




392 




















10,684 


174.02 


6.33 


2.920 


47.00 


2 


734 


14,338 








1,556,508 






















1,570,846 











*The 392 yards shown for the portable mixers are reinforced concrete, and were placed on the following days: 
August 28th, 81J; August 29th, 76; August 30th, 77$; August 31st, 61; September 1st, 59; September 2nd, 37. 

PEDRO MIGUEL LOCKS. 

Concrete work in the locks at Pedro Miguel is over 85 per cent completed, 716,553 cubic 
yards, out of a total of 837,400, bucket measurement, having been placed at the close of work 
on September 2. The record for each of the six 8-hour working days of last week, follows: 





Auxiliary Plant. 


Large 
stone. 






2-cubic yard mixers. 


i-cubic yard mixer. 


Total. 




Concrete 
placed. 


Hours 1 No. of 
worked. 1 mixers 


Concrete 
placed. 


Hours 
worked. 


No. of 
mixers 






Cu. Yds. 
708 
770 
686 
560 
556 
590 


19.00 
19.00 
19.00 
16.00 
16.00 
17.00 


3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 


Cu. Yds. 
254 
195 
123 
171 
82 
60 


16.83 

11.00 
6.00 

14.00 
3.50 
2.50 


3 
2 

3 

1 


Cu. Yds. 


Cu. Yds. 
962 




96S 




809 




731 




638 




650 








3.870 


106.00 


3 


885 


53.83 


1.83 


4.441 


4,755 




711,798 






















4,441 


716,553 



















MIRAFLORES LOCKS 

Over 28 per cent of the concrete for the system of two twin locks at Miraflores was in 
place on September 2 the total amount on that date being 3S7.609 cubic yards, bucket 
measurement, out of a total of approximately 1,362,000. The record for each of the six 8-hour 
working days of last week, follows: 





Construction Plant. 
2-cubic yard mixers. 


Auxiliary Plant. 




Date. 


2-cubic yard mixers. J-cubic yard mixer. 


Total. 




Concrete 
placed. 


Hours 
worked . 


No. of 

mixers 


Concrete: Hours No. of Concrete 
placed. 1 worked. ! mixersl placed. 


Hours 
worked. 


No. of 

mixers 


Large 
stone. 




Aug. 28. . 
Aug. 29 . . 
Aug. 30 . . 
Aug. 31 . . 
Sept. 1.. . 
Sept. 2. . . 


Cu. Yds. 
1,130 
1,240 
1.318 
1,182 
1,342 
1,120 


25.33 
25.75 
30.50 
28.10 
29.17 
22.17 


5 
5 
6 
6 
6 
6 


Cu. Yds. 

962 

1.072 

1,016 

1.060 

946 

818 


15.27 
17.33 
16.90 
15.90 
15.00 
14.27 


2 
2 
2 
2 
2 
2 


Cu. Yds. 

180 

216 

92 

25 


11.50 

17.33 
6.00 
1.50 


2 

2 
1 
1 


Cu. Yds. 


Cu. Yds. 
2,272 
2,528 
2,426 
2,267 
2.288 


67 


5.00 


1 




2.005 


Total . . 
Previously 
reported . 


7,332 


lot cu 


5 67 


5,874 


94.67 


2 


580 


41.33 


1.17 


3,693 


13,786 
373,823 






















Grand 


3,693 


387,609 























September 6, 1911. 



THE CANAL RECORD 



11 



ORDINANCES. 



Amendment to Ordinance Providing for Certain 

Taxes and Licenses in the Canal Zone Other 

Than for the Sale of Intoxicating Liquors. 

Be it enacted by the Isthmian Canal Com- 
mission, that Section 7 of the Ordinance 
providing for certain taxes and licenses in 
the Canal Zone other than for the sale of 
intoxicating liquors be, and the same hereby 
is, amended by adding at the end thereof the 
following: 

Provided: That the Collector of Revenues 
may refuse to issue a license for any of the 
objects named in paragraphs (b), (e), (f), (g), 
(i), (j), and (k) if the character of the applicant 
is such as to warrant the belief that the exer- 
cise of the privilege granted by the license 
would not be conducted in an orderly and 
lawful manner, and Provided further, That 
any license granted pursuant to the provisions 
of paragraphs (b), (e), (f), (g), (i), (j), and 
(k) of this section shall at once become null 
and void upon conviction in any court of the 
Canal Zone of a violation of law in the exer- 
cise of the privilege granted by such license, 
and Provided further, That licenses granted 
pursuant to the provisions of paragraphs (e), 
(g). (i), (j). an d (k) hereof shall not authorize 
the exercise of such privileges during the 
hours from 12 midnight to 7 a. m. 

Enacted by the Isthmian Canal Commission, 
August 5, 1911. 
Approved by the Secretary of War, August 22 1911. 



Ordinance Providing for Night Quarantine In- 
spection of Vessels at the Port of Colon. 

Be it enacted by the Isthmian Canal Com- 
mission, as follows: 

Section 1. That vessels with perishable 
cargo arriving at Colon after sunset with the 
intention of sailing within a few hours, or 
before daylight of the following day, will be 
received by the quarantine officials until 10 
p. m. 

Section 2. Such vessels shall not be allowed 
to come to the wharf, and shall disembark 
and embark passengers by means of a tug. 

Section 3. A tug shall be furnished the 
quarantine officer for the purpose of the visit 
of inspection. 

Section 4. Any vessel, steamship compand- 
or agent of a steamship company requesting 
this service, shall pay to the Isthmian Canal 
Commission the sum of one hundred dollars 
($100) United States currency, in addition 
to the expense of the tug furnished under 
Section 3 of this ordinance for each vessel 
so inspected. 

Enacted by the Isthmian Canal Commission, 
August 5. 1911. 

Approved by the Secretary of War, August 22, 1911. 



Ordinance Establishing Market Regulations for 
the Canal Zone. 

Be it enacted by the Isthmian Canal Com- 
mission, that the following regulations for the 
conduct of public markets, and the leasing 
of space therein, shall be in force on and after 
their approval by the Secretary of War: 

1. The markets are provided as places for 
the sale to residents of the Canal Zone of meat, 
fish, vegetables, fruits, and other articles of 
food, and the space in them will not be leased 
for any other purpose; Provided, That, in the 
discretion of the Superintendent of Public 
Works, not more than one-half of the space 
available in a public market may be leased 
for the sale of dry goods, groceries, notions, 
cigars, tobacco, soda water, and other soft 
drinks, and for use as lunch counters and news 



stands where no application has been received 
for the leasing of the space for the sale of 
food products, but the Superintendent of 
Public Works shall have authority to cancel 
the assignment of space leased for the purposes 
enumerated in this proviso, should applica- 
tion be made for such space for use for the sale 
of food products; Provided further, That, 
when space is leased for the sale of dry goods, 
groceries notions, cigars, tobacco, soda water, 
and other soft drinks, and for use as lunch 
counters and news stands, the rate of rental 
shall be twenty (207°) per cent, in advance, 
over that charged when used for the sale of 
food products. 

2. All assignments of space shall be for the 
period of one month, beginning on the 16th 
day thereof, and ending on the 15th day of 
the succeeding month; except that assign- 
ments made after the first of any month shall 
be for a half month, counting from the first 
of the month, and shall be paid for at one-half 
the monthly rate; and except also that this 
shall not apply to tables and other similar 
space rented by the day, and so indicated on 
the posted plat. 

3. There shall be posted in a conspicuous 
place in each market a plat signed by the 
Superintendent of Public Works, and Collec- 
tor of Revenues, showing the sizes and rates of 
rental of the various stalls, and other divisions 
of space. 

4. Application for assignment of space shall 
be made to the Market Inspector. If ap- 
proved, the inspector will issue an assign- 
ment, indicating the space assigned, the 
period of assignment, the purpose for which 
it is to be used, and the amount of rental to 
be paid to the Deputy Collector of Revenues. 
Upon return of the assignment, with the 
exhibition of the Deputy Collector's receipt, 
possession of the space will be given. 

5. Not more than one stall or other divi- 
sion of space in each market will be assigned 
to any one person, except by special authority 
of the Superintendent or Assistant Superin- 
tendent of Public Works. 

6 Lessees of space will not be permitted 
to make any changes in the arrangement of 
partitions, shelves, etc. Requests for desired 
changes will be made of the Market Inspector. 
If approved by him, he will secure an estimate 
of the cost of the work, and, upon deposit 
with him by the lessee of the amount of the 
estimate, the work will be done by the Isth- 
mian Canal Commission. The excess of the 
deposit, if any, over the cost of the work, 
will be returned to the lessee. 

7. All stalls and other divisions of space 
shall be thoroughly swept at the close of each 
day. Special attention shall be given to the 
spaces used for the sale of meat and fish' the 
counters, blocks, etc., used in them shall be 
scrubbed with soap and water as often as 
necessary to keep them in good sanitary con- 
dition. All decayed fruit and vegetables, 
and other dirt and refuse, shall be removed 
and deposited in the sanitary cans provided 
for that purpose. All articles in bulk shall be 
kept in bags, barrels, or boxes, so that they 
can be moved in cleaning. Lessees shall be 
responsible for the cleanly and sanitary con- 
dition of the space assigned them, and shall 
carry out such special instructions to that 
end as may be given them by the Market 
Inspector or his authorized assistant. The 
Market inspector will be responsible for the 
cleanly and sanitary condition of the market 



outside of stalls and other space assigned to 
lessees. 

8. Lounging or loitering around the market 
will not be permitted. Lessees are expected 
to enforce this prohibition as to the space 
assigned them. 

9. The hour for opening and closing each 
market shall be fixed by the Superintendent 
of Public Works, and posted in a conspicuous 
place in the market. 

10. Any complaint respecting a market 
should be addressed to the Superintendent of 
Public Works, Ancon, C. Z. 

11. The continued occupancy of space in 
any market after the expiration of the period 
for which rental has been paid is declared a 
misdemeanor, and, upon conviction thereof, 
shall be punishable by a fine not exceeding 
$25, or imprisonment in jail not exceeding 
thirty (30) days, or both, in the discretion of 
the court. Any other violation of these 
regulations by a lessee shall be considered 
sufficient cause for the cancellation of his 
assignment; but such cancellation shall not 
relieve the offending person from prosecution 
under any penal law or ordinance he may 
violate. 

12. These regulations shall be posted in a 

conspicuous place in each market. 

Enacted by the Isthmian Canal Commission, 
August 5, 1911. 

Approved by the Secretary of War, August 22, 1911. 



The Six- Year Men. 



The following circular letter has been sent 
out to employes who have completed six 
years' continuous service on i the Isthmus. 
The committee in charge requests that men 
whose names may have been omitted from 
its mailing list, will communicate with its 
chairman: 

"At a meeting in Panama on August 12, preliminary 
steps were taken to perfect an organization of employes 
of the Isthmian Canal Commission and the Panama 
Railroad Company, who have completed six years' 
continuous service on the Isthmus. The possible 
objects of such an organization were discussed, and a 
constitution was adopted, subject to final approval at 
a more general meeting, to which all persons eligible 
to membership, and who had signified an intention to 
join the society, should be invited. The undersigned 
were appointed a committee to determine on a name 
for the society, select a design for its emblem, solicit 
members, and make the necessary arrangements for 
the first general meeting. 

"There are now approximately four hundred men 
on the Isthmus who are eligible for membership in the 
society, or will become eligible before November 1 , 
1911. Thenumberwill increase rapidly thereafter, and, 
it is estimated that before the official opening of the 
Canal, some fifteen hundred men will have completed 
six years' continuous service on the Isthmus. The 
majority of these men will be known to one another: 
they will have many common interests, and a strong 
motive for maintaining mutual relations in after years. 
The society will serve them as a means of intercom- 
munication and friendly cooperation. 

"We are sending you herewith a copy of the consti- 
tution of the society, which will explain in greater 
detail its aims and plan of organization. If it is your 
wish to be enrolled as a charter member, please sign 
the attached card, and return it with a remittance of 
three dollars — the dues for one year — to Mr. C. A. 
Mcllvaine, treasurer pro tern, Culebra, C. Z. 

"The time and place of the first general meeting 
will be announced later in The Canal Record. 

"The committee would be glad to receive suggestions 
for a name for the society, and designs for its emblem, 
as well as proposals relating to any enlargement of its 
aims which you might consider desirable." 
Very truly, 
John K. Baxter, William F. Shipley, R. E. 
Wood, C. A. McIlvaine, John J. Meehan. 
Culebra, C. Z., August 31, 1911. 



A slot machine containing sanitary drinking 
cups has been installed in the Commission 
clubhouse at Gorgona. 



12 



THE CANAL RECORD 



Vol. V., No. 2. 



STEAM SHOVEL RECORDS. 



Work in Central Division in August. 

During the month of August, the total 
amount of material excavated in the Central 
Division was 1,464,294 cubic yards, of which 
191,485 cubic yards were classified as earth, 
and 1,272,809 cubic yards as rock. Of this 
quantity, 1,442,402 cubic yards were removed 
by steam shovels, and contractors removed 
9,972 cubic yards by sluicing, and 11,920 
cubic yards by hand. 

The high record for the month was made 
by shovel No. 256, working 27 days in the 
Culebra district,' which excavated 64,256 
cubic yards of rock. 

The second best record for the month was 
made by shovel No. 227, working 27 days in 
the Culebra district, which excavated 62,627 
cubic yards of rock. 

The best record for a shovel of the seventy- 
ton class was made by shovel No. 109, working 
27 days in the Culebra district, which exca- 
vated 45,573 cubic yards of rock and earth. 

Shovel No. 253, working in the Empire 
district, made a high record for one day by 
excavating 3,610 cubic yards of rock on 
August 1. 

Except where noted, monthly reports are 
computed by place measurement, while the 
daily reports are based on car measurement. 
The best records for the month, and for one 
day, arc shown below: 

BEST RECORDS FOR THE MONTH. 

EMPIRE DISTRICT. 







Cubic 


Yards. 




Shovel 
No. 


Earth. 


Rock. 


Total. 


No. of 
daya at 
work. 


232 




41,832 
35,436 


41,832 
35,436 
34,388 


27 


221 




27 


253 




34,388 


27 













CULEBRA DISTRICT. 



256. 
227. 
204. 



64,256 | 64,256 
62,627 I 62,627 
54,465 | 54.465 



27 
27 
26 J 





PEDRO 


MIGUEL. 






231 




20,462 


20,462 


17 









BEST RECORDS FOR ONE DAY. 



i 

o 
III 


Location. 


Date. 


Character of 

material 
excavated. 


Cubic 

yards. 


(5,1 


Empire 

Culebra 


Aug. 1 

Aug. 7 
Aug. 21 
Aug. 9 
Aug. 5 
Aug. 9 
Aug. 10 


Rock 


3,610 


70S 


Rock 


2,932 


23? 


Rock 


2,227 


256 


Ro> k 


3,002 


777 


Rock 


7,785 


' 17 


Rock 


2,753 


7. \ 1 


Rock 


1,539 











Steam Shovels on Relocated Line in August. 

The total excavation on the relocated line 
of the Panama railroad amounted to 371,076 
cubic yards. Of this amount, 216,855 cubic 
yards were classified as borrow (75 per cent 
solid rock), 99,015 cubic yards as earth, 1,411 
cubic yards as loose rock, and 53,795 cubic 
yards as solid rock. 

Company forces removed 369,066 cubic 
yards, and 2,010 cubic yards were removed 
by the contractor. 

Steam shovels excavated 359,363 cubic 
yards. Pan car task gangs took out 7,763 
cubic yards, and 1,940 cubic yards were 
excavated for culvert foundations. 

The best month's record was made by 
steam shovel No. 257, working in the Gatun 



section, which excavated 71,550 cubic yards 
of solid rock. 

I In the 70-ton class, the best month's record 
was made by steam shovel No. 117, working 
in the Monte Lirio section, which excavated 
8,390 cubic yards of earth, and 25,180 cubic 
yards of solid rock, a total of 33,570 cubic 
yards. 

The best day's record for shovels with 
5-yard dippers was made by steam shovel 
No. 262, working at Monte Lirio, which exca- 
vated 3,800 cubic yards of earth a'nd rock on 
August 21. 

The best day's record for 70- ton shovels 
was made by steam shovel No. 113, working 
near Bas Obispo, which excavated 2,080 
cubic yards of earth and rock on August 4. 

Month's records are all place measurements, 
and day's records are car measurements. All 
material was loaded in 10-yard Western 
dump cars. 

BEST RECORDS FOR THE MONTH. 



o 
2 




Cubic Yards by Cross Section. 


> 
o 

X 


Location. 


Days 
worked. 


Earth 


Rock. 


Total. 


257 
262 
117 
123 


Gatun .... 
M. Lirio.. . 
M. Lirio.. . 
Empire... . 


27 
27 
27 
27 


6,400 

8,390 

15,680 


71,550 
58,330 
25,180 
17,360 


71,550 
64,730 
33,570 
33,040 



BEST RECORDS FOR ONE DAY. 



6J 
> 

o 
Ifl 


Location. 


Date. 


Character of 

material 

excavated. 


Cubic 
yards. 


262 

?57 


Monte Lirio . 

Gatun 

Bas Obispo. . 

Paraiso 

Empire 

Empire 


Aug. 21 
Aug. 29 
Aug. 4 
Aug. 30 
Aug. 25 
Aug. 15 


Earth and rock. . . 
Rock 


3,800 
3,380 


113 

.'ii(, 
121 
173 


Earth and rock. . . 
Earth and rock . .. 
Earth and rock. . . 
Earth 


2,080 
2,030 
1,860 
1,860 









Total steam shovel output during the month of 
August, 359,363 cubic yards. 

Total number of steam shovel working days, 254. 
Average output per working day, 1,415 cubic yards. 



Gatun Dam Spillway. 

The concrete work in the Spillway of Gatun 
Dam is about 69 per cent completed, 153,808 
cubic yards, out of a total of 225,000, having 
been placed at the close of work on September 
2. A statement of the amount laid each 
working day last week, and of the total in 
place, follows: 



Date. 


Concrete 
Laid. 


Hours 
worked. 


No. 
Mixers. 




128 
212 
160 
228 
156 
160 


12.00 
14.00 
14.00 
16.00 
12.00 
15.00 


2 


August 30 


2 




2 




2 




2 






Total 


1,044 
152,764 


83.00 


2 


Previously reported. . . 






153,808 









Pistol Championship Match. 

The Culebra Pistol Club will hold an open 
championship match for the Canal Zone and 
the United States at the range in Culebra on 
September 10 to 17, inclusive. The range 
will be open all day on September 10 and 17, 
and from 12 to 2 and 5 to 7 o'clock each 
afternoon from the 11th to the 16th, inclusive, 
provided contestants make arrangements 
beforehand. The match will be shot under 
the rules of the United States Revolver Asso- 
ciation, and will be held synchronously with 
matches held at twenty-five different ranges 
in the United States. There will be five events, 



all at fifty yards, and with the standard 
American target with eight-inch bull's-eye. 
Match A will be fifty shots with any ammuni- 
tion and revolver; B, fifty shots with any 
pistol and ammunition; C, seventy-five shots 
with a military revolver and service ammuni- 
tion; D, twenty-five shots with a military 
revolver and service ammunition; E, twenty- 
five shots with any pocket revolver and service 
ammunition. The entry fee for events A, B, 
and C, will be three dollars; for event D, one 
dollar; for event E, two dollars. Entrants 
should communicate with L. D. Cornish, 
Culebra. Gold, silver and bronze medals 
will be awarded as first, second, and third 
prizes. 



Accidents to Panama Railroad Steamships. 

The Allianca of the Panama railroad 
steamship line, which left New York on August 
30 for the Isthmus, was disabled off Norfolk, 
Va., and obliged to put back to New York 
until repairs could be made to the machinery. 
The passengers and mails were transferred to 
the Oruba of the Royal Mail line, en route to 
the Isthmus, which is due to arrive at Colon 
on Sunday, September 10. The Allianca will 
sail from New York about September 23. 

In latitude 30 degrees 40 minutes north, 
and longitude 74 degrees 15 minutes west, 
on August 26, the Panama railroad steam- 
ship Colon, on its voyage from New York to 
Cristobal, encountered an ordinary southeast 
gale, during which a sea was shipped forward 
that damaged the forward end of the dining 
saloon, broke a "strong back" at hatch No. 1, 
and washed away the ship's bell and a section 
of rail on the upper deck. Necessary repairs 
were made before the Colon left the Isthmus 
on the return voyage. 



Visit of National Bankers' Association. 

The excursion of the National Bankers' 
Association of the United States to the Canal 
Zone will be made in the three new steam- 
ships now building at Belfast for the United 
Fruit Company, the Peralta, Sixola, and 
La Senora. They will sail from New Orleans 
on November 25 at noon, and will arrive at 
Colon on the morning of November 30. The 
return trip will be made from Colon on 
December 2 While on the Isthmus the party 
will be in charge of the United Fruit Company, 
whose guides will conduct the members over 
the Canal work, and through the city of 
Panama. 



Population of Panama and Colon. 

A careful census has been taken of the 
cities of Panama and Colon by the Govern- 
ment of Panama, in connection with the 
national census now being concluded. The 
results are furnished the Commission by the 
Secretary of Foreign Affairs of the Republic, 
tabulated, as follows: 



RACE OR FAMILY. 



White 



Mesti- 
zos 



Ne- 
groes 



Ama- 
rillos 
(Yel- 
low) 



Indi- 
ans 



Total 



City of Panama. 



Male.. . . 
Female. . 


3,611 

3,397 


7,273 
8,964 


6,196 

4,767 


1,133 

27 




18,213 
17,155 


Total . . 


7,008 


II...! 17 


10,963 


1,160 




35,368 







City of Colo 


w. 






Male.. . . 
Female. . 


1,516 
1,099 


1,923 ! 5,555 
2.484 j 4,452 


527 
92 | 


99 

1 


9,620 
8,128 


Total . . 


J.l.l.s 


4,407 1 10,007 


619 


100 


17,748 






September 6, 1911. 



THE CANAL RECORD 



13 



CANAL ZONE AGRICULTURE. 

Abstract of Report By Agricultural Experts. 

The experts detailed by the Department of 
Agriculture to make an investigation into the 
agricultural possibilities of the Canal Zone, 
have made a report, which will be published 
by the department as one of its scries of 
bulletins, and may be procured upon appli- 
cation to the Secretary of Agriculture, 
Washington. The investigation was conducted 
by Wm. A. Taylor, pomologist. and Hugh 
H. Bennett, scientist in soil survey, assisted 
in the field by H. F. Schultz, who, during the 
period of the survey — the winter of 1909-10 — 
was in charge of the experimental gardens 
maintained by the Commission. The report 
is in two parts — (1) Reconnaissance agricul- 
tural survey, and (2) The outlook for agri- 
culture in the Canal Zone. 

The conclusions, with regard to agricul- 
tural possibilities, are, as follows: 

Large farming operations are impracticable in the 
Canal Zone on account of the broken topography. 
Small farms, operated by the proprietors, or under a 
central directive management, through which crop 
rotation and handling could be systematized and con- 
trolled, constitute the probable course of best agricul- 
tural development, especially where valuable, perish- 
able products, destined for shipment outside the Canal 
Zone are concerned, such as choice mangoes, avocadoes, 
pineapples, mangosteens, chayotes. and other tropical 
fruits and vegetables which are apparently well adapted 
to conditions in the Zone. The staple crops best 
adapted to the conditions appear to be corn, cassava, 
yams of several species, sugar cane, plantains, bananas, 
and upland rice, with a large number of other tropical 
and subtropical crops of less importance in the Zone, 
including cocoa, coffee, and rubber. 

The methods practiced are most primitive 
and transient, and little effort appears to 
have been devoted to selecting and developing 
desirable types, which alone can create an 
efficient and profitable agriculture The total 
crop production of the Zone at present is, 
in consequence, very small, and the products 
in general are of low quality, and incapable of 
maintaining other than very primitive stand- 
ards of life. The occurrence of occasional 
choice strains, and individual trees and plants 
of superior excellence, indicates that great 
improvement in productiveness and quality 
of most of the products could be promptly 
secured by well directed, systematic plant 
introduction, and plant improvement work. 

The most promising line of attack upon the 
agricultural problem of the Canal Zone will 
apparently be to develop a permanent mixed 
tropical agriculture, with a distinct horti- 
cultural trend, in which hand labor of tropical 
origin will be the main dependence for tillage. 
In this way, the existing and prospective 
conditions would favor the production of 
high priced products requiring regular and 
frequent transportation service, such as will 
doubtless be available promptly after the 
opening of the Canal for use. One important 
feature should be the early working out of a 
method of mixed cropping, in which soil 
maintaining and improving leguminous inter- 
crops can be continuously used to replace the 
wild and intractable native vegetation of the 
present shack-farm agriculture. 

To quickly and effectively develop such a 
method will doubtless require some intelli- 
gently directed experimental work, as it 
involves careful study of the whole question 
of plant relationships and antagonisms, one 
of the most important and far reaching prob- 
lems in tropical agriculture, as well as the 
control of injurious insects and plant diseases. 



To meet the obvious needs, the following 
lines of work are suggested: 

(1) A careful study of the existing culti- 
vated types of crop plants of the Canal Zone, 
and the adjacent territory of the Republic 
of Panama, with the view to locating and 
perpetuating the better strains of such staple 
crops as have already demonstrated their 
adaptability to the conditions. 

(2) Systematic introduction of promising 
types and varieties from other tropical 
countries, with a view to securing the best 
and most valuable varieties and strains that 
have been developed under similar conditions 
elsewhere. This feature is of special import- 
ance in the Canal Zone, because of the back- 
wardness of the agricultural industry at the 
present time. 

(3) The adjustment of some northern types 
of vegetables, and other perishable crops, to 
tropical conditions by selection and breeding. 
This will probably be a slow and tedious u nder- 
taking, but the fact that the maintenance 
of the Canal will probably necessitate the 
continuous presence of a considerable popu- 
lation of northern birth and tastes, who are 
not likely to be quickly or easily reconciled 
to tropical vegetable products, renders it well 
worth while to undertake. 

(4) The development of more economical, 
effective, and permanent methods of farming, 
including contouring, tillage, crop rotation, 
and other points essential to the conservation 
of the soil and the maintenance of soil 
fertility. Special attention should be given 
to the introduction and establishment of 
crops needed for maintaining and encouraging 
the dairying and poultry industries, and to 
the establishment of these industries on a 
stable economic basis. 

(5) The production of useful timber on 
lands not suitable for general agriculture, 
including such trees as the various species of 
eucalyptus, teak etc. 



Canal Medals. 

Seven hundred and twenty-six Canal 
medals, earned by Canal and railroad em- 
ployes up to January 1, 1911, have been 
distributed on the Isthmus. The service bars 
are being engraved, and will be distributed 
within a month or six weeks. 



Fund for Relief of Mrs. L. R. Dennis. 

The following statement is published for 
the information of the Canal Zone people 
who contributed to the relief of the wife and 
children of the late L. R Dennis: 

RECEIPTS. 

Public subscription at Gatun S59S.25 

Public subscription at Empire 440.52 

Entertainment at Gatun 300.35 

Canal Zone Red Cross 30.00 

Knights of Pythias at Ancon 100.00 

Knights of Pythias at Culebra 50.00 

Knights of Pythias at Empire 50.00 

Knights of Pythias at Las Cascadas 50.00 

Knights of Pythias at Gorgona 50.00 

Knights of Pythias at Cristobal 10.00 

Pythian Sisters 15.00 

Total Sl.694.12 

DISPOSITION. 

Sent to Mr. W. W. Warwick, August 25. 1911. $1,374.62 
Postal money order in Mrs. Dennis' posses- 
sion when she sailed 65.00 

Cash in Mrs. Dennis' possession when she 

sailed 59.00 

Other cash paid Mrs. Dennis 90.00 

Hospital expenses of Mrs. Dennis, and other 

items 66.69 

Balance in hands of treasurer, and to be 
collected 38.81 

Total $1,694.12 

Mrs. Dennis and her six children were cared 
for by the Red Cross while in the Canal Zone; 



free transportation to the States was fur- 
nished them, and arrangements were made 
to have them cared for in Washington, until 
such time as Mrs. Dennis can procure a 
position. She was recommended to the super- 
intendent of the State, War, and Navy build- 
ing in Washington for a position as chore- 
woman. Her preference was to reside near 
Washington, and to that end, W. W. Warwick 
and Ernest Daniels, the latter a Washington 
real estate man, have been appointed trustees 
for the purpose of investing about §1,200 in 
a house near Washington to be used by the 
family, but not to be sold until the youngest 
child is IS years of age. Fifty dollars will be 
paid to Mrs. Dennis for the ensuing two 
months, and any balance remaining after the 
purchase of the house, will also be paid to her. 



PERSONAL. 



Mr. W. G. Comber left on the Colon on 
Tuesday, September 5, on his annual leave 
of absence in the States. 



Public Installation by Ancon Kangaroos. 

A public installation and dance was held 
by Ancon Court. No. 7, I. O. P. K. at 
Ancon hall on Saturday evening, August 26. 
The officers installed were: Judge, George H. 
Vogan, prosecuting attorney, X. D. Holt; 
defendant attorney, G. L. Griley; comptroller, 
H. H. Hammer; chaplain, A. S. Curtis; sheriff, 
Michael Dew. During the ceremony, music 
was furnished by an orchestra, and Miss 
McDonald sang two selections, accompanied 
by Mrs. Wallace on the piano. Refreshments 
were served. 



United Spanish War Veterans. 

A meeting of the United Spanish War 
Veterans will be held in the lodge hal! at 
Culebra on September 10 at 2.30 p. m., when 
the camp charter will be opened. 

On Saturday evening, September 9, the 
United Spanish War Veterans will give an 
entertainment and dance at the clubhouse 
in Gatun. The public is invited, especially 
those who have seen service in the army or 
navy. 



Annual Meeting of Tivoli Club. 

At the annual meeting of the Tivoli Club 
on August 27, the following officers were 
elected for the ensuing year: President, Dr. 
J. C. Perry; first vice-president, Col. J. P. 
Fyffe; second vice-president, Alban G. Sny- 
der; secretary and treasurer, J. W. Tannehill; 
board of governors include the officers Tom 
M. Cooke, and A. S. Zinn. The membership 
committee consists of H. S. Hunter and W. K. 
Jackson. The report of the secretary and 
treasurer shows a cash balance of $1,497.47. 



U. F. Co.'s Coastwise Service to be Resumed. 

The coastwise service of the United Fruit 
Company between New Orleans and Colon, 
will be resumed with the sailing of the 
Parismina from New Orleans on Wednesday, 
September 13, and the sailing of the Carlago 
from Colon on Thursday, September 14. 
These ships stop on both outward and inward 
bound trips at Port Limon, Costa Rica, and 
Puerto Barrios, Guatemala. 



W. G. Russell and James A. Daly, the 
highest bidders, have been awarded the con- 
tract for soliciting baggage on Panama 
railroad trains, and at stations, and for 
handling it at the terminals. 



14 



THE CANAL RECORD 



Vol. V., No. 2. 



OILS AND GREASES. 



Kind Used, Manner of Receiving and Distributing, 
Consumption and Use. 

The number of lubricating, illuminating, 
and miscellaneous oils and greases received 
and standardized by the Commission and 
Panama railroad is 21, of which 10 are lubri- 
cating, two illuminating, four miscellaneous 
oils; and five are greases, including non- 
liquid oil. 

Lubricants and oils are standardized, as 
follows: Valve, air compressor cylinder, 
marine, stationary, locomotive, turbine, and 
gas engine oils, crank case, car, transformer, 
lard, ammonia cylinder, and crude oil. 
Greases — nonliquid oil, cup, gear, cable, and 
crank pin grease. Illuminating — signal and 
kerosene oils. Gasoline. 

Of the above mentioned oils, 12 are received 
by the Commission in 50-gallon steel drums, 
and three in cases of two 5-gallon cans each. 
Three kinds of greases are received in barrels, 
and two in 25-pound cans. Crude oil is sup- 
plied to the different points in containers con- 
venient for the work required, drawn from 
crude oil tanks located on the Isthmus. 

The approximate monthly consumption 
and use of each grade by the Commission 
and the Panama railroad is, as follows: 

Valve oil, 5,350 gallons — For the internal lubrication 
of all steam valves and cylinders. 

Air compressor cylinder oil. 150 gallons — For the in- 
ternal lubrication of air cylinders of all compressors, 
pneumatic hammers, and drills. 

Marine engine oil, 4,175 gallons — For use on marine 
engines and block bearings of suction dredges. 

Stationary engine oil, 2,750 gallons — For the general 
lubrication of stationary engines and machinery, elec- 
tric motors, and dynamos. 

Locomotive engine oil, 3,850 gallons — For all loco- 
motives, running gears of locomotive cranes, deck 
machinery of dredges, and for cold saws in machine 
shops. 

Turbine engine oil, 400 gallons — For the step bearings 
of turbine engines in electric plants. 

Gas engine oil. 150 gallons — For the cylinders of 
internal combustion engines. 

Crank case oil. 100 gallons — For use in crank cases 
of Westinghouse vertical compound engines. 

Car oil, 5,175 gallons — For the journals of rolling 
stock generally, steam shovel bearings, tripod drills, etc. 
Transformer oil, 200 gallons — For use by the electri- 
cal divisions in oil-cooled transformers. 
Lard oil, 50 gallons — Miscellaneous use. 
Ammonia cylinder oil, 50 gallons — For the internal 
lubrication of cylinders of ammonia compressors. 

Crude oil, 1,000 gallons — Used for the lubrication of 
steam shovel chains, and special designated uses. 

Kerosene oil, 10,000 gallons — For illuminating and 
cleaning purposes. 

Signal oil, 100 gallons — Used in railroad lanterns and 
cab lights of engines. 

Gasoline, 3,350 gallons — For use on motor cars, 
launches, blow torches, cleaning, etc. 

Nonliquid oil, 1,850 pounds — Used on Gatun cable- 
ways and air cylinders. 

Cup grease, 6,000 pounds — For use in compression 
cups. 

Gear grease, 6,1 75 pounds — For use on gears, center 
and side bearings, etc. 

Cable grease, 1.000 pounds — Used on the Gatun 
cableways. 

Crank pin grease, 40 pounds — For use on locomotive 
crank pins, equipped for the use of grease. 

The various equipment on which the above oils 
and greases are used is, as follows 
Canal equipment — 

Steam shovels 100 

Locomotives 385 

Cars 5,880 

Drills 560 

Cranes 58 

Unloaders 30 

Spre Mers 25 

Track shifters 10 

Pile drivers 20 

Floating equipment — 

Dredges 20 

Tugs 14 

Clapets 11 

Barges, lighters, and scows 83 

Launches 14 

Cutters 3 

Pile drivers 2 



Tow boat 1 

Crane boat 1 

Drill boats 2 

Rock breaker 1 

Plant equipment — 

Electric power plants 7 

Hydraulic plant 1 

Air compressor plants 3 

Shops (machine and power) 9 

Industrial railway: 

Locomotives, electric 8 

Cars 16 

24 

Automatic railway cars 45 

Coal hoist 1 

Cantilever cranes 5 

Berm cranes 4 

Cableways (Gatun), 6 double and 1 single. . 7 

Rock crushers 2 

Cold storage plant 1 

Laundries 2 

Bakery 1 

Municipal pumping and condensing plants . , 15 
Miscellaneous equipment — 

Such as moter cars, road rollers, trucks, emergency 
steam, electric, and air pumps used in construction, 
relay pumps, emergency pumping stations, channellers, 
lighthouses, houseboats, and outlying points are sup- 
plied with illuminating oils. 

Method of handling — All lubricants and oils 
are received at the general storehouse located 
at Mount Hope, and are distributed from 
there to the various division storehouses, 
including the Panama railroad and outlying 
depots to the number of 10, from which points 
they are supplied to the local oil houses, 
situated at places convenient to the work, 
whence they are issued in daily, weekly, and 
monthly quantities, as requisitioned on oil 
tickets, by employes in charge of the equip- 
ment or plant. Oils are delivered to the local 
oil houses in 50-gallon drums, which are used 
as distributors by the insertion of a faucet, 
and have a value to the Commission when 
returned to the contractor in good order. 

All oiling equipment of the Commission 
and Panama railroad is standardized, as fol- 
lows: Twenty-four-inch spring hand oilers, 
locomotive tallow pots, spring stationary 
engine oiler, squirt can, oil cans with screw 
covers and spout, of one, two, and five-gallon 
capacity. 

All equipment and plants of the Com- 
mission and Panama railroad are placed on a 
monthly allowance, according to the partic- 
ular necessities and nature of work performed 
by each. A monthly report is required of the 
consumption of each individual piece of 
equipment and plant, which shows service 
days, and a satisfactory explanation of 
amounts used in excess of the monthly 
allowance must be made. Monthly reports 
are posted at different places for the infor- 
mation of all concerned. All equipment and 
plants are furnished with standard oiling 
equipment and kept in good repair, and are 
supplied also with containers for oil drawn 
for future use. 

Oiling systems and drip pans are installed 
where required, and where sufficient quanti- 
ties of oils can be reclaimed, filters are fur- 
nished. When the reclaiming of oils through 
drip pans is not sufficient to warrant the 
installation of a filter, oil is filtered at a 
central station for reuse. Careful attention 
is given to every detail of the work in regard 
to the issuing, handling, and consumption of 
lubricants and oils, and instructions have 
been issued with reference to economical use 



SOCIAL LIFE OF THE ZONE. 



Pilots, Mates, Masters, Chauffeurs. 

Examinations for pilots, mates, and mas- 
ters; and for chauffeurs, w 11 be held by the 
Board of Local Inspectors at Ancon on Sep- 
tember 13. 



Church Work. 

St. James' Protestant Episcopal church at 
Empire was dedicated on Sunday afternoon, 
August 20. The dedicatory service was read 
by the general missionary and the Rev. Jesse 
R. Bicknell preached the sermon. Special 
music was rendered by the choir. A small 
grant was made by the Church Missions 
building fund for the building, and the re- 
mainder was raised by the congregation. The 
building is completed, furnished, and paid for. 
The parish is a large one, extending through 
old and new Empire, Golden Green, and the 
neighboring native villages. 

The altar society of the Roman Catholic 
church at Gorgona has discontinued its meet- 
ings until the first of October. During the 
past year, the society has maintained the 
organist at a weekly salary, taken charge of 
the cleaning of the church, purchased orna- 
ments, and installed a lavatory in the building. 
The parish dates from the French occupation. 
The building was used by the Commission 
for a storehouse until, in response to a petition 
of the Roman Catholic residents of Gorgona, 
it was assigned for church services. Since 
that time, two years ago, it has been reno- 
vated, and is maintained by the congregation. 
In connection with the church, there is a 
small Sunday school of American children. 
In September, there will be confirmation in 
the church, when the Bishop of Panama will 
officiate. 

Social Events. 

The regular dances of the Las Cascadas 
club are held in the lodge hall on the second 
and fourth Thursday evenings in each month. 
Informal dances are held on the first and third 
Thursday evenings. 

The Las Cascadas Euchre Club meets fort- 
nightly on Tuesday afternoons at the homes 
of members. One evening in each month 
an informal card party and dance is held, 
when the husbands and friends of the mem- 
bers are invited. 

The Canal Zone Chapter, Royal Arch 
Masons, held a dance and banquet in the 
Commission hotel at Las Cascadas on Satur- 
day evening, August 19, in honor ol their first 
anniversary. A special train brought mem- 
bers and their families from Paraiso and 
intermediate stations. Following the dance, 
which was held in the social hall, a banquet 
was served in the hotel dining room. Covers 
were laid for 150. The only chapter of Royal 
Arch Masons in Panama was organized at 
Las Cascadas on July 23, 1910, under a 
charter granted by the General Grand Chap- 
ter of Royal Arch Masons of the United 
States of America. 



Girls' Sewing Club. 

A girls' sewing club has been organized in 
Gorgona. The meetings will be held weekly 
on Friday afternoons at the homes of the 
members. The girls will learn plain sewing, 
hemming, stitching, and embroidery, under 
a directress. The initial meeting was held 
on Friday afternoon, September 1, at the 
home of Mrs. S. E Calvit. 



Lost — In the streets of Colon, on the evening of 
September 1. a ribbon watch fob bearing Canal medal, 
double Elk emblem, silver mounting. Canal medal 
No. 3,382. Reward, if returned to post-office, Cristobal. 



Sons of Veterans. 

All those desiring to become charter mem- 
bers of the Sons of Veterans of the war of 
1861-65 are requested to send their names to 
Past Camp Commander C. M. Fairbanks, 
Tabcrnilla, who has an application for a 
camp charter. 



September 6, 1911. 



THE CANAL RECORD 



15 



COM MISSION CLUBHOUSES. 



Activities of the Young Men's Christian Associ- 
ation. 

The moving picture schedule for the week of Sep- 
tember 11 to 16, follows: Monday night, Gorgona; 
Tuesday, Gatun; Wednesday. Cristobal; Thursday 
Culebra: Friday, Corozal; Saturday. Empire 

CULEBRA. 

The monthly high score in duckpius was made by 
Mr. Huttlemaier. 124. Mr. Driscoll won the high score 
in bigpins. 247. 

The Hearons Sisters will give a return concert on 
Sunday evening, September 10, which will be open to 
the public. 

The volleybal' tournament, with five teams entered; 
opened on Tuesday night, September 5. The Quarter- 
master's team played the Married Men. The Inde- 
pendents will meet the All Stars on Friday evening at 
8 o'clock 

The Cristobal bowling team took three games from 
Culebra on the home alleys on Saturday evening. Sep- 
tember 2. 

EMPIRE. 

The following high scores were bowled during the 
past week: Duckpins — Pinney, 101, 101; Pulsifer. 106. 
101; Coombs, 102; Dakin, 100, 122; McLeod, 102; 
Scull. 125. Tenpins — Anderson, 216; Davis, 205. 

The league game bowled on the Empire alleys on Sat- 
urday. September 2, resulted in Empire winning three 
straight games. The scores were, as follows 
Empire. Gatun. 

Parkis 167 193 214 Louner 125 144 157 

Sawtelle 146 179 134 O'Meara . . . 191 204 144 

Drake 141 146 154 Chamberlain 136 146 147 

Goolsby 168 147 136 Galloway... 142 155 122 

Giavelli 200 166 206 Barte 160 145 136 

Total 822 J*31 844 754 794 706 

The subject for discussion by the literary society for 

September 8 will be "Tne initiative, referendum, nnd 

recall." 

GORGONA. 

The Gorgona Health League met on Tuesday even- 
ing, August 29, and discussed eugenics, or race im- 
provement as outlined in the book on tint subject 
recently sent out by the health league. The discussion 
was led by Mr. Swanson. This is the first of a series of 
discussions to be given under the auspices of the 
health league. 

Thirty-five men have been enrolled in the gymna- 
sium class. Apparatus work has been taken up, and 
will be continued for the remainder of the season. 

The Hearons Sisters Concert Company will fill a 
return engagement on Saturday night, September °. 

The Gorgona boy scouts walked to Tabernilla on 
Sunday, August 22. and took an exploring trip from 
there. They found the lake near that place, and 
se'ected a camping site to be used at some future time. 

The Isthmian bowling league series was opened on 
Saturday, September ?, with Gorgona at Camp 
Elliott, and Camp Elliott at Gorgona. The home team 
won three straight games at Camp Elliott. The scores 
at Gorgona were, as follows: 

1st game. 2nd game. 3d game. 

Gorgona 776 7SS 737 

Camp Elliott . . 751 757 768 

GATUN. 

The health league was organized on Tuesday night. 
Mr. Fomon was elected president, and Mr. Fitzpatrick, 
secretary. 

Messrs. Weston and Glick of Cristobal furnished 
vocal and piano music at the moving picture show on 
Friday night. 

There were 2.093 games bowled on the Gatun alleys 
during August. Twenty men rolled over 100 in duck- 
pins. DePoorter and Wurster tied for high s~oro in 
duckpins — score. 121. Wurster won the tie. Louner 
and Hodges tied in tenpins. 

On September 11, two-men "ragtime" tournaments 
will be started in duck and tenpins. Prizes will be given 
the winners. 

Gatun won two out of three games in the bowling 
league series with the Empire team at Gatun on Satur- 
day, September 2. Scores, as follows: 

Gatun 903 805 887 

Empire 789 915 829 

CRISTOBAL. 

The standing of the teams in the bowling league 
tournament is. as follows: 

Won. Lost P. C. 

Cristobal 6 1 .000 

Empire 4 2 666 

Marines 4 2 666 

Gorgona _ 2 4 333 

Gatun .... * 2 4 333 

Culebra 6 000 

On Wednesday night. August 27, at the meeting of 
the debating club, the question was "Resolved, that 



United States senators should be elected by direct 
vote of the people." The affirmative won. Attendance, 
93. 

Basketball practice will take place every" Tuesday 
night. Volleyball will be played every Tuesday and 
Thursday afternoons at 5.30 o'clock. Regular gym- 
nasium classes will be held on Monday and Thursday 
of each week at 7.45 p. m. 

On Monday night there was a wrestling match in the 
gymnasium between Messrs. Walker and Antonio, 
the latter winning two falls in 84 and 5 minutes, re- 
spectively. 

Seventeen boys went on the outing to Old Panama on 
Labor Day. 

Married. 

CLARK-WILSON — At St. Luke's chapel in Ancon, 
on September 2, the Rev. J. R. Bicknell officiating, 
Jessie Sanderson, daughter of Mrs. Mary Sanderson 
Wilson of Norfolk county. Ya., to Herbert C. Clark, 
M. D.. of Philadelphia, Pa. Canal Zone residence. 
Ancon. 

GIBSON-SEYMOUR— At Cristobal, on August 31, 
Edith M. Seymour of Petoskey, Mich., to Dr. William 
C. Gibson of Empire, the Rev. A. A. Nellis officiating. 
Canal Zone residence. Empire. 



OFFICIAL CIRCULARS. 



Rainfall from August 1 to 31, 1911, Inclusive. 



rt S3 



Pacific Section — 

Ancon 

Balboa 

*Miraflores 

Pedro Miguel 

Rio Grande 

Central Section — 

Culebra 

*Camacho 

Empire 

Gamboa 

*Juan Mina 

Alhajuela 

*E1 Yigia 

*Gorgona 

San Pablo 

Tabernilla 

Bohio - 

*Trinidad '. 

*Monte Lirio 2.11 

Atlantic Section — 

Gatun 

*Brazos Brook 

Cristobal 

Porto Bello 

*Nombre de Dios 











V 








rt o 




s 


a 


Ins. 




1.94 


12 


2.49 


12 


2.30 


20 


1.15 


9 


2.13 


2 


2.47 


21 


1.64 


21 


1.96 


21 


0.85 


25 


3.20 


31 


1.29 


21 


1.49 


19 


1.05 


2 


1.70 


25 


2.13 


15 


1.05 


25 


1.34 


15 


2.11 


15 



20 
14 

1-1 
13 
20 



Ins. 
7.21 
8.50 
7.06 
5.43 
8.17 

8.36 

7.98 

5.98 

7.68 

12.88 

10.79 

12.56 

8.51 

7.21 

8.40 

5.69 

8.17 

9.58 

7.91 
12.19 
11.60 
22.56 
11.70 



♦Standard rain gage — readings at 5 p. m. daily. 
Automatic rain gage at unstarred stations — values 
midnight to midnight. 



Stages of the Chagres. 

Maximum heights of the Chagres River for the 
week ending midnight, Saturday, September 2, 1911. 
All heights are in feet above mean sea level. 







Station. 






Day and Date. 


Vigia. 


3 
< 


eg 
o 

£ 
re 
O 


6 

~o 
pq 


5 6 


Sun.. Aug. 27 . . 
Mon., Aug. 28.. 
Tues.. Aug. 29.. 
Wed.. Aug. 30.. 
Thurs., Aug. 31 

Fri., Sept. 1 

Sat.. Sept. 2 . . . 


127.5 
127.2 
128.2 
126.6 
126.6 
129.4 
126.8 


93.7 
93.7 
94.2 
93.2 
93.0 
95.1 
93.6 


47.6 
46.8 
47 .2 
46.4 
48.2 
48.4 
48.0 


16.0 
IS 8 
15 6 
15.6 
15 3 
15.8 
15.8 


15. S 
15.6 

15.4 
15.3 
15.2 

15.2 
15.4 


Height of low 
water 


125.0 


92.0 


44.0 







Disbursing Officer. 

Culebra, C. Z., August 29, 1911. 

Circular Xo. 406: 

Theduties of Disbursing Officer on the Isthmus will 
be assumed by Mr. William M. Wood on September 1, 
1911. to serve in that capacity during the absence of 
Mr. Edward J. Williams, on leave. 

Geo. W. Goethals, Chairman. 



Surcharge on Material and Labor at Marine Camp . 

Culebra, C. Z., September 1, 1911. 
Circular No. 169-j: 

Effective this date, the same surcharge will apply on 
material and labor furnished the Marine Battalion 
at Camp Elliott as on material and labor furnished to 
divisions and departments of the Isthmian Canal 
Commission. Geo. W. Goethals, 

Chairman and Chief Engineer. 



Acting Collector of Revenues. 

Ancon. C Z.. August 21, 1911. 
I have the honor to designate Mr. Arthur McGown, 
Deputy Collector of Revenues, as Acting Collector 
of Revenues during my absence in the States on leave, 
effective August 24. and request your approval of the 
same. Very respectfully, 

Tom M. Cooke, Collector of Revenue s. 
Approved: M. H. Thatcher, 

Head of Department of Civil Administration. 



Band Concert. 

A concert will be given by the Isthmian Canal Com- 
mission Band at the Hotel Tivoli. Ancon. C. Z.. on 
Sunday, September 10, 1911, at 7.30 p.m. The program 
follows : 

1. March — Unter den Siegcsbanner Von Blon 

2. Selection — The Spring Maid Reinhardt 

3. Romance — A Tale of Two Hearts .«. Roberts 

4. Overture — Morning, Neon, and XirIU 

in Vienna. .Suppe 

5. Waltz — Casino Tanze Gung'l 

6. (a) — Chicken Reel Daly 

lb) — Casey Jones Newton 

7. Flower song — Sweet Summer Rose Armand 

s Popular medley — Remick's Hits Lampe 

9. March — Napoleon's Last Charge Paul 

Chas. E. Jennings, Musical Director. 
The next concert will be given at Gorgona. C. Z.. 
nber 17, at 6 p. m. 

Tide Table. 

The following table shows the time of high and low 
tides at Panama for the week ending September 13. 
1911 (75th meridian time): 



Date. 



Low. 



September 7 . . 
September S . . 
September 9 . . 
September 10 . 
September 1 1 . 

September 12 . 
September 13 . 



12.27 



High. 


Low. 


A.M. 


A.M. 


2.58 


9.08 


3.30 


9.45 


4.05 


10.20 


4.40 


10.57 


5 15 


11.33 




P.M. 


5.50 


12.10 


6.30 


12.50 



High. 



P.M. 
3. 10 
3.47 
4.20 
5.00 
5.35 

6.10 
6.50 



Low. 



P.M. 
9.23 
10.00 
10.37 
11.12 
1 1 . 50 



Porto Bello Crusher. 

A statement of the wort done at the Porto Bello 
crusher, by days, for the week ending September 2. 
follows: 



Date. 



Cubic 
Yards. 



August 28 - 
August 29 . 
August 30 . 
August 31 . . 
September 1 
September 2 

Total 




1,746 

2.165 
1.621 
1,974 
1 ,888 
1,667 



11,059 



WEATHER CONDITIONS, CANAL ZONE, AUGUST, 1911. 





- Urr Temperature. 


>, 

Si 

01 3 

92 


Precipitation. 


Wind. 


Stations. 


Press're (redu 
to menu of Z 
hours.) 

Mean. 


s" 

3 

2 

s 

86 
91 

9J 


V 

a 

24 

: 


5 
S 

73 
7n 
70 


6 

K 

R 

12 

12 


| 

o 


u 

X 

2 - 

— cjfl 

5 "- 


■J. 

5-a 

■£ 3 

3 ^ 


Total move- 
ment ( in 
miles.) 


si- 


"v'a 
> - 

s 





u 

3 


a 
Q 




29.82" 
29.SU 
29.806 


1160 


15.13 
7.61 


2: 
:: 

19 


6.405 


w. 

N.W. 
N.W. 


38 

19 


w. 

N.E. 
N. 


Q 















16 



THE CANAL RECORD 



Vol. V., No. 2. 



COMMISSARY DEPARTMENT. 



The open hours at Culebra commissary are from 
8 a. m. to 1 p. m., and from 3 p. m. to 7 p. m. All 
other commissaries are open from 8 a. m. to 1 p. m. 
and 3 p. m. to 7 p. m., with the exception of the Cris- 
tobal commissary, which is open from 8 a. m. to 12.30 
p. m., and from 2 p. m. to 7 p. m. 

Retail prices of cold storage provisions for the week 
beginning September 2. 

fresh meats. Price. 

Mutton — Stewing, per pound 6 

Shoulder, neck trimmed off, (4 pounds 

and over) , per pound 9 

Entire forequarter (not trimmed). 10 

pounds and over, per pound 8 

Leg (8 to 10 pounds) , per pound 17 

Cutlets, per pound 18 

Short cut chops, per pound 20 

Lamb — Stewing, per pound 6 

Entire forequarter, neck trimmed off, 

per pound 9 

Leg (5 to 8 pounds), per pound 20 

Chops, per pound 24 

Cutlets, per pound 24 

Veal — Stewing, per pound 10 

Shoulder, for roasting (not under 4 

pounds) , per pound 12$ 

Chops, shoulder, per pound 16 

Chops, per pound 24 

Loin, for roasting, per pound 24 

Cutlets, per pound 28 

Pork — Loin chops or roast, per pound |18 

Beef — Suet, per pound 

Soup, per pound 

Stew, per pound 8 

Corned, No. 1, per pound 12 

Corned, No. 2, per pound 10 

Chuck roast (3 pounds and over), per 

pound 12 

Pot roast, per pound 12 J 

Rib roast, second cut (not under 3$ 

pounds), per pound 16 

Rib roast, first cut (not under 3 pounds), 

pe? pound 18 

Sirloin roast, per pound 19 

Rump roast, per pound 19 

Porterhouse roast, per pound 20 

Steak, chuck, per pound 12$ 

Round, per pound 13 

Rib, per pound * 18 

Sirloin, per pound 19 

Rump, per pound 19 

Porterhouse (not less than 1$ 

pounds), per pound 20 

Tenderloin (Western), per pound. 24 

MISCELLANEOUS. 

Caviare, Russian, per tin 47, 89 

Livers — Beef, per pound 7 

Calf, each 60 

Half, each 30 

Steak, Hamburger, pkg 13 

Sausage — Bologna, per pound 10 

Frankfurter, per pound 12 

Lleberwurst, per pound 10 

Devonshire Farm 17 

Sweetbread — Veal, per pound 1 . 20 

25 

28 

15 

14 

15 

70 

35 



Beef, per pound . 

Eggs, fresh, dozen 

one-half dozen only. 
Bluefish, fresh, per pound.. 

Halibut, fresh, per pound. ? 

Shads, fresh, each 

Shad roes, fresh, per pair 



POULTRY AND GAME. 

Chickens — Fancy roasting, milk fed, large, each 

Fancy roasting, milk fed, med., each 

Fancy roasting, corn fed, about 4$ 

pounds, each 

Fowls, each 60, 70, 80, 90, 

Ducks, Western, about 4k pounds, each 

Broilers, milk fed, each 

corn fed, each . 

Turkeys, per pound *. 

Squabs, each 

Capons, each 

Fryers, corn fed. each 

Partridges, each 

Grouse, each 

CURED AND PICKLED MEATS. 

Ham — German, Westphalia, per pound 

Sugar cured, per pound 

Sliced, per pound 

Half, for boiling, per pound 

Boiled, per pound 

Hocks, per pound 

Bacon — Breakfast, whole piece, per pound 

Breakfast, sliced, per pound 

Pork, salt family, per pound 

Ox tongues, each 

Pigs' feet, per pound 

Tongues, per pound 

Sliced bacon in 1-pound tins, per tin 

Ui 1-pound jars, per jar 

DAIRY PRODUCTS. 

Butter — Creamery special, per pound 

Cheese — Roquefort, per pound 

Philadelphia cream, cake 

Young America, per pound 

Swiss, per pound 

Edam, each 1 

Neufchatel, cake 

Gouda. per pound 



1.25 
1.00 

90 

1.00 

1.00 

60 

55 

26 

35 

2.10 

60 

50 

50 

36 

18 
20 
19 
26 

:s 

22 

23 

*13 

1.00 

9 

18 

30 

30 



Price. 

Milk (Certified), per bottle **25 

Buttermilk, bottle **15 

Ice cream, quart t25 

^-gallon 150 

VEGETABLES AND FRUITS. 

Beets, per pound *3 

Celery, per head 6 

Corn, green, per doz 24 

Cabbage, per pound *3 

Cucumbers, per pound 3 

Carrots, per pound *4 

Cauliflower, per pound 13 

Lettuce, per pound |12 

Onions, per pound *3j 

Potatoes, white, per pound *4 

sweet, per pound 2 

Pears, alligator, each 6 

Peppers, green, per pound 7 

Rhubarb, per pound 3 

Turnips, per pound 4 

Tomatoes, per pound *4 

Yams, per pound 3 

Apples, per pound 10 

Cantaloupes, each 8 

Grapes, per pound 7 

Lemons, dozen 24 

Limes, per 100 80 

Oranges, California, per dozen 42 

Pears, per pound 8 

Peaches, pound *6 

Plums, per pound 9 

Watermelons, each 30 

♦Indicates reduction from last list. 
**Indicates 5 cents allowed for return of bottle, 
flndicates advance on last list. 

tSoId only from commissaries; no orders taken for 
delivery 



MOVEMENT OF OCEAN VESSELS. 



Supplies for Canal Work. 

The following steamers, with supplies for the Isth- 
mian Canal Commission, arrived at the ports of 
Cristobal, Colon, and Balboa, during the week ending 
September 2 : 

Venus, August 27, from Gulfport, with 10,544 pieces 
lumber for stock; 554 pieces piling for Atlantic Division. 

Etonian, August 27, from Liverpool, with 200 barrels 
carbolic acid for stock. 

Trent, August 27, from New York, with 13 bundles 
turnbuckles for stock. 

Kansas City, August 28, from San Francisco, with 
1,195 pieces redwood lumber and 650 pieces white 
oak lumber for Mechanical Division. 

Atenas, August 31, from New Orleans, with 11 pack- 
ages rock crusher parts and 230 pieces ties for Pacific 
Division; 48 bundles washers and 74 pieces piling for 
Atlantic Division; 198 pieces white oak lumber and 
1,345 bundles siding lumber for Mechanical Division; 
2,033 pieces yellow pine lumber, 308 bundles ceiling 
lumber, 1,573 bales hay, 2,728 sacks oats, 510 sacks 
bran, for stock. 

Colon, September 1, from New York, with 10 pieces 
castings for Atlantic Division; 19 cases rubber boots 
and 92 bundles steel bars for Pacific Division- 6 cases 
steel, 5 cases copper wire, 14 barrels journal bearings, 
for Mechanical Division; 6 barrels crockery, 7 cases 
air hose and couplings, 18 barrels chipped soap, 10 
cases envelopes, 40 pigs tin, for stock; and a miscel- 
laneous cargo, the whole consisting of 282 packages, 
weighing 50 tons. 

Almirante, September 1, from New York, with 88 
barrels fire sand for Mechanical Division; 24 bales 
oakum for stock. 



Misdirected Letters. 
Ancon, C. Z.. September 6, 1911. 
The following insufficiently addressed letters, origi- 
nating in the United States and its possesssion, have 
been received in the office of the Director of Posts, 
and may be secured upon request of the addressee: 



Bean, Mrs. E. C. 
Briggs. Ray 
Browning, Robert F. 
Brozile, Mrs. D. A. 
Buchanan, Jonathan 
Campbell, Capt. Otis F. 
Du Maine, Alphonse (2) 
Emery, Mrs. Mary 
Hamilton, J. I. 
Hayse, Dr. Harry 
Klunk, Mrs. Charles 
Lenerett. Hugh 
Lewis, Lewis 



Martin, Bernard 
McKnight, John 
Nelson, Elliott 
Orza, Manuel 
Peterson. G. C. (2dclass) 
Ray, J. R. 

Reese. Dr. Frederick 
Rielley, H. I. 
Robertson. Earnest 
Spencer, Henry 
Thompson, J. M. 
Vreeland. W. K. 



The following vessels arrived at, or departed from 
the port of Balboa during the week ending September 
2: 

Arrivals — August 28, Kansas City, from San Fran- 
cisco; Ucayali, from Callao; August 29, Ecuador, from 
Guayaquil; August 30, Chile, from Guayaquil; Aysen, 
from Valparaiso; August 31, Newport, from San Fran- 
cisco; September 2. Pleiades, from San Francisco. 

Departures — August 28, Oberon, to Port Harford; 
Guatemala, to Callao; August 29, Peru, to Guayaquil; 
August 31, M ackinaw.^toJSan Francisco. 



The following is a list of the sailings of the Panama 
Railroad Steamship Company; of the Royal Mail 
Steam Packet Company; of the Hamburg-American 
Line, and of the United Fruit Company's Line; the 
Panama Railroad Company's dates being subject to 
change. 

NEW YORK TO CRISTOBAL. 

Panama P. R. R... Tuesday Sept 5 

Advance P. R. R... Monday Sept. 11 

Colon P. R. R... Monday Sept. 18 

Allianca P. R. R... Saturday. . .Sept. 23 

Panama P. R. R... Friday Sept. 29 

Advance P. R. R.. . Thursday. . . Oct. 5 

Colon.' P. R. R... Thursday.. .Oct. 12 

Allianca P. R. R... Wednesday. Oct. 18 

Panama P. R. R. . .Tuesday. ...Oct. 24 

Advance P. R. R.. . Monday .... Oct. 30 

CRISTOBAL TO NEW YORK. 

Panama P. R. R... Sunday Sept. 17 

Advance P. R. R.. . Saturday . . . Sept. 23 

Colon P. R. R.. .Saturday. . .Sept. 30 

Allianca P. R. R... Friday Oct. 6 

Panama P. R. R.. Thursday.. .Oct. 12 

Advance P. R. R.. . Tuesday Oct. 1 7 

Colon P. R. R... Tuesday Oct. 24 

Allianca P. R. R... Monday Oct. 30 

Panama P. R. R. ..Sunday. . . .Nov. 5 

Advance P. R. R . . Saturday. . . Nov. 1 1 

NEW YORK TO COLON. 

Santa Marta U. F. C . .Thursday.. .Aug. 31 

Prinz Sigismund H.-A Friday Sept. 1 

Oruba R. M Saturday. ..Sept. 2 

Metapan U. F. C . .Thursday.. .Sept. 7 

Prinz Joachim H.-A Saturday. . .Sept. 9 

Zacapa U. F. C. .Thursday.. .Sept. 14 

Prinz Eitel Friedrich. . . H.-A Friday Sept. 15 

Magdalena R. M Saturday. ..Sept. 16 

Almirante U. F. C. . .Thursday. ..Sept. 21 

Prinz Aug. Wilhelm H.-A Saturday. ..Sept. 23 

Santa Marta U. F. C. . .Thursday. .Sept. 28 

Prinz Sigismund H.-A Friday Sept. 29 

Clyde R.M Saturday . . Sept. 30 

Metapan U. F. C. .Thursday. .Oct. 5 

Prinz Eitel Friedrich H.-A Saturday. ..Oct. 7 

Atrato R.M Saturday. ..Oct. 14 

COLON TO NEW YORK. 

Almirante U. F. C . .Thursday.. .Sept. 7 

Prinz Aug. Wilhelm H.-A Tuesday Sept. 12 

Santa Marta U. F. C . .Thursday.. .Sept. 14 

Prinz Sigismund H.-A Saturday. . .Sept. 16 

Clyde R.M Tuesday Sept. 19 

Metapan U. F. C. Thursday. ..Sept. 21 

Prinz Joachim H.-A Tuesday. . .Sept. 26 

Zacapa U. F. C . . Thursday . . .Sept. 28 

Prinz Eitel Friedrich . . . H. A Saturday . . .Sept. 30 

Atrato R. M Tuesday Oct. 3 

Almirante U. F. C. .Thursday. .Oct. 5 

Prinz Aug. Wilhelm H.-A Tuesday. . .Oct. 10 

Thames R.M Tuesday. . .Oct. 17 

NEW ORLEANS TO COLON. 

Turrialba U. F. C . .Saturday. . .Sept. 2 

Abangarez U. F. C . .Saturday. . .Sept. 9 

Parismina U. F. C. .Wednesday. Sept. 13 

Atenas U. F. C . .Saturday. ..Sept. 16 

Heredia U. F. C. .Wednesday. Sept. 20 

Turrialba U. F. C . .Saturday. . .Sept. 23 

Abangarez U. F. C . .Saturday. . .Sept 30 

Parismina U. F. C. .Wednesday .Oct. 4 

Atenas U. F. C . ..Saturday . . . Oct. 7 

COLON TO NEW ORLEANS. 

Atenas U. F. C . . Thursday. . . Sept. 7 

Turrialba U. F. C . .Thursday. . .Sept. 14 

Cartago U. F. C. ..Thursday. .Sept. 14 

Parismina U. F. C. .Thursday. .Sept. 21 

Abangarez U. F. C . .Thursday.. .Sept. 21 

Heredia U. F. C . .Thursday. ..Sept. 28 

Atenas U. F. C . .Thursday. ..Sept. 28 

Cartago U. F. C. .Thursday . ..Oct. 5 

Turrialba U. F. C. .Thursday. .Oct. 5 

Paiismina U. F. C . . Thursday. .Oct. 12 

Hamburg-American steamers leave Colon for New 
York via Kingston at 10 a. m. on sailing dates. The 
Prinz A ugust Wilhelm and Prinz Joachim call at 
Santiago de Cuba, on both outward and homeward 
voyages. 

Royal Mail steamers leave for New York on alter- 
nate Tuesdays, at 10 a. m.; for Southampton on alter- 
nate Tuesdays at 10 a. m. 

United Fruit Company's ships for New Orleans 
direct leave on Thursdays at 3 p. m.; ships for New 
Orleans in the coastwise service on Thursdays at 4 p.m. ; 
ships for New York via Kingston on Thursdays at 11 
a.m.; for BnrasdelToroonMondaysat6p.nl 

The Leyland line steamer Louisianian sails for New 
Orleans^direct on or about September 28. 



CANAL 




RECORD 



ANCON, CANAL ZONE, WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 13, 1911. No. 3. 



Volume V. 



The Canal Record 

Published weekly under the authority and supervision of 
the Isthmian Canal Commission. 



The Canal Record is issued free of charge, one copy 
each, to all employes of the Commission and Panama 
Railroad Company whose names are on the gold roll. 
Extra copies and back numbers can be obtained from the 
news stands of the Panama Railroad Company for five 
cents each. 

Address all Communications 

THE CANAL RECORD, 

Ancon, Canal Zone, 

Isthmus of Panama. 

No communication, either for publication jr requesting 
information, will receive attention unless signed with the 
full name and address of the writer. 



NOTES OF PROGRESS. 



Unloading Dock for Dynamite at Mindi. 

A wharf, 130 feet long and 20 feet wide, 
will be built along the old French canal at 
Mindi, near the crossing of the American 
Canal, at which dynamite ships will tie up 
for unloading. Up to the present time, dyna- 
mite ships have unloaded at the only avail- 
able place, the docks at Mount Hope, and 
although no accidents have occurred since 
the first shipment arrived in 190-1, there is 
always danger of an explosion which might 
wreck the shipping in the harbor, and do 
considerable damage in Colon and Cristobal. 
The point at which the new dock will be con- 
structed is about two miles north of Gatun, 
and four miles south of Cristobal, and an 
explosion at this point would, therefore, do 
less damage. It will be necessary to dredge 
about 27,000 cubic yards of material in the 
old French canal as an approach to the dock. 
Ships containing dynamite will pass up the 
American Canal direct to the new dock. The 
railroad already in use in hauling spoil from 
the excavation pit at Mindi will be available 
for the dynamite trains. It is estimated that 
about 15,000,000 pounds of dynamite remain 
to be unloaded before the Canal is completed. 



Canal Work in August. 

The grand total of Canal excavation to 
September 1 was 148,192,759 cubic yards, 
leaving to be excavated 47, 130,620 cubic yards, 
or less than one-fourth of the entire amount 
for the completed Canal. 

The total for August was 2,706,223 cubic 
yards, as compared with 2,813,462 cubic yards 
in August, 1910, and 2,755,178 cubic yards 
in August, 1909. All the excavation was 
"work excavation." there being no "plant 
excavation." 

The dry excavation amounted to 1,698,554 
cubic yards, and was principally by steam 
shovels. The dredges removed 847,771 cubic 
yards, and 159,898 cubic yards were sluiced, in 
addition to the amount pumped into Gatun 
Dam by suction dredges. The progress on 
the locks at Gatun, Pedro Miguel, and Mira- 



flores is referred to elsewhere in this issue. 

In the Atlantic Division, the total excava- 
tion was 455,055 cubic yards. Of thia total, 
87,599 cubic yards were dry excavation, and 
the remainder was removed by the dredges 
in the Atlantic entrance. 

The total excavation in the Central Divi- 
sion was 1,464.294 cubic yards, all of which 
was from the prism. The amount taken from 
Culebra Cut was 1,442,402 cubic yards, the 
greatest excavation for a rainy season month 
in the history of the Cut. 

In the Pacific Division, the total excavation 
was 786,874 cubic yards, 480,315 cubL yards 
of which were taken out by the dredges at 
the Pacific entrance, and 149,926 by the 
hydraulic excavation plant working immedi- 
ately below Miraflores Locks. 

A detailed statement of the excavation, and 
a summary of the work on the locks and 
dams, follow: 

ATLANTIC DIVISION. 



Locality. 


"Work." 
Excava- 
tion. 


"Plant." 
Excava- 
tion. 


Total 
excava- 
tion. 


Dry excavation — 
Locks, Dam and Spill- 


Cm. Yds. 

22.558 

65 01i 


Cu. yds. 


Cu. yds. 
22.558 






65 041 








Total 


S7.5OT 




87,599 
















367.456 




367,456 


Locks, Dam and Spill- 












Total 


367.456 




367,456 
















Total wet and dry 


4=.=. 055 




4=5.055 



CENTRAL DIVISION. 



D*y excavation — 


1.442.402 
11,920 




1.442.402 







11,920 


Wet excavation — 


9,972 




9,972 








Total 


1.464.294 




1.464.294 



PACIFIC DIVISION. 



Dry excavation — 
Locks, Dams and Spill- 


102,469 




102.469 






Prism, south of Pedro 


54,164 




54,164 






Total 


156.633 




156.633 
















630.241 




630,241 








Total 


630,241 




630.241 














Total wet and dry 


786,374 




786.S74 



TOTAL CANAL EXCAVATION 






1.69S.554 
1.0U7.669 




1.698.554 






1 .007 669 








Total 


2 706.223 




2.706.223 



DAM AND LOCK CONSTRUCTION. 



Concrete laid in locks. 
Concrete laid in dams 

and spillways 

Fill placed in dams 



Atlantic. Pacific. Total 



Cu. yds. Cu. yds. 
66.928 77.739 



5.050 
491 .515 | 



122,015 



Cu. Yds. 

144.667 



5.050 
613.830 



COST OFCONCRETE. 

Statement of Operations for the Fiscal Year 
1910-11. 

The total amount of concrete laid during 
the fiscal year 1910-1911 was 1.742,928 cubic 
yards. There were laid in the Atlantic 
Division 970.78S cubic yards, of which 59,651 
cubic yards were laid in the Spillway, and 
911 137 cubic yards in the locks. In the 
Central Division, there was laid in connection 
with the flume constructed for the Obispo 
diversion 1,020 cubic yards. In the Pacific 
Division, 771,120 cubic yards were laid, of 
which 498,187 cubic yards were placed in the 
Pedro Miguel Locks, and 272,933 cubic yards 
were placed in the Miraflores Locks. In laying 
concrete for the locks in the Atlantic Divi- 
sion, the construction plant was operated on 
the basis of a 12-hour day, and the auxiliary 
plant on the basis of a 9-hour day, with the 
exception of a short period between Sep- 
tember and November. In the Pacific Divi- 
sion, the work has been done on the basis of 
an 8-hour day. Taking into consideration 
the service time of hours at work, it is ascer- 
tained that the Atlantic Division laid 237.05 
cubic yards per hour, and the Pacific Divi- 
sion, 352.67 cubic yards per hour. The cost 
per cubic yard for concrete in the Gatun 
Locks was $6.5919; in the Gatun Spillway, 
$6.7044: in the Pedro Miguel Locks, S4.7040 
per cubic yard; and in the Miraflores Locks, 
S4.6826. At Gatun, 73,609 cubic yards of 
large rock were used resulting in a saving of 
$263,137.45, or of 0.2888 cents per cubic 
yard on each yard of material placed. 

In the production of stone for the concrete, 
the cost in bins at Gatun was S2.3403 per 
cubic yard, and in the storage pile for the 
locks on the Pacific side, SO. 8443 per cubic 
yard. Sand was procured at Nombre de Dios 
for concrete in the Atlantic Division, and 
cost SI. 8565 per cubic yard in storage. Sand 
for the locks on the Pacific side was secured 
at Chame and cost, in storage, S0.8284 per 
cubic yard. Crushed stone from Porto Bello 
is transported to Gatun in barges, and un- 
loaded by cableways and derricks, while 
crushed rock from Ancon is transported 
from the quarry by rail to storage, and 
dumped from trestles. The difference be- 
tween the cost of towing and unloading, and 
that of transporting by rail, is $0.7184 per 
cubic yard. If this be deducted from the 
actual cost in storage, it leaves a cost of 
$1.6219 per cubic yard for Porto Bello stone 
at Gatun, as against S0.8443 for stone for 
the locks on the Pacific side The haul for 
sand from Nombre de Dios is 40 miles, 
while from Chame it is 20 miles. The Atlantic 
Division used cableways and cranes for un- 
loading the sand, while the Pacific Division 
used electric cranes. Omitting the cost of 
transportation from the sand banks to the 
docks, the cost to the Atlantic Division was 
$1.3142 per cubic yard, and to the Pacific 
Division SO. 6015 per cubic yard. Cement for 



18 



THE CANAL RECORD 



Vol. V., No., 3. 



the large part is delivered in barrels to the 
Atlantic Division at a cost of $1.19 at tide 
water in the United States, while in the 
Pacific Division, it is delivered in bags at a 
cost of SI- 60 at tide water in the United 
States per barrel, less credit for return of 
bags. As approximately 90 per cent of the 
bags were returned and accepted, the cement 
in bags cost $1.01 per barrel at tide water in 
the United States. 

The construction plant in the Pacific Divi- 
sion handles a large percentage of its cement 
directly from cars to mixers resulting in 
reduced rates, whereas nearly all the cement 
in the Atlantic Division is handled through 
its storehouse. The year's operations show 
a difference in favor of the Pedro Miguel 
Locks of $1.7340 in the cost of cement, sand 
and stone, and large rock; in the other items 
which go to make up the cost of the finished 
product, the Pedro Miguel Locks show a 
lower cost for forms, placing, pumping, 
power, repairs, plant arbitrary, and in divi- 
sion expenses, while a difference exists in 
favor of the Atlantic Division in mixing and 
reinforcement. The construction plant at 
Pedro Miguel was in operation in its entirety 
from the 15th of July to the lsc of February, 
and a comparison of the costs for the 6 
months' period, with the costs at Gatun for 
the year, show less costs at Pedro Miguel 
for all items, except for reinforcement. 

In the item of mixing, the Pedro Miguel 
construction plant shows a cost of $0.1334, 
while at Gatun, the cost by the construction 
plant was $0.1749 per cubic yard. 

Examination of the costs of the work 
shows also that the amount paid for salaries 
of clerks, and for supervisory forces, was 
26.05 per cent in the Atlantic Division, and 
22.95 per cent in the Pacific Division. 



Survey for Penitentiary Farm. 

A survey has been authorized of some land 
owned by the Government in the valley and 
low hills east of Pedro Miguel, to determine 
its availability for a reservation of about 450 
acres for a prison farm. It is expected that, 
ultimately, the penitentiary, now situated 
in Culebra on the edge of Culebra Cut, will 
be moved to this or a similar reservation. 
The tract in question is near the relocated 
line of the Panama railroad and the Canal 
Zone highway. 

Land Survey. 

Field work on the Canal Zone land survey 
has been completed, and the data is being 
collated in the office of the Third Division of 
the Chief Engineer's office at Culebra. Data 
have been procured for a general topographical 
map of all the Zone, except the land that will 
be covered by water of Gatun and Miraflores 
lakes. All the principal ridges, watercourses, 
and trails, have been located and surveyed. 

The survey was made under the provisions 
of an Act of Congress of June, 1910, in which 
(75,000 was appropriated for this purpose. 
The object was to make such maps as would 
enable the Commission to issue leases to 
Government lands under the provisions of 
the land law of February 29, 1909. The in- 
tention was to make a section survey, dividing 
rhe territory covered into sections of two 
kilometers square, with reference to a prin- 
cipal meridian established at Balboa Hill, 
near Gorgona, and a parallel passing through 
the same point. Work in the southeast 
quadrant developed the fact that such a 
survey would be of little value, because of 
the rugged topography, and the fact that 



much of the land, heretofore considered 
Government land under the original grant 
of commons to the city of Panama, is claimed 
by various people under prescriptive titles. 
The lines of the estates, so claimed, are 
referred to ridge tops, watercourses, and 



trails. The plan was, therefore, changed 
to a general topographical survey, and the 
resulting maps will show not only the nature 
of the country, but also the principal physical 
features to which many of the claims of 
prescriptive titles are referred. 



CONCRETE WORK IN THE LOCKS. 



Over 64 per cent of the concrete for all the locks is in place, the amount at the close of 
the work on September 9, being 2,701,148J cubic yards, out of a total of approximately 4, 199,400. 
A total of 26,140| cubic yards of concrete was laid in the locks during the week ending Sep- 
tember 9. 

GATUN LOCKS. 

Over 79 per cent of the concrete for the system of three twin locks at Gatun has been 
laid, the amount in place at the close of work on September 9, being l,5S2,964j cubic yards, 
out of a total of 2,000,000. A statement of the amount of concrete placed in the locks each 
working day for the week ending September 9, and of the total, follows; and a similar statement 
for the work in the Spillway of Gatun Dam is published elsewhere in this issue. The con- 
struction plant works 12 hours daily, and the auxiliary plant 9 hours. 





Construction Plant. 
2-cubic yard mixers. 


Auxiliary Plant. 
2-cubic yard mixers 


Large 
stone. 






Concrete, Hours 
placed. 1 worked. 


No. of 

mixers 


Concrete 
placed. 


Hours 
worked. 


No. of 
mixers 






Cu. Yds. 






Cu. Yds. 




Cu. Yds. 


Cu. Yds. 




1,816 
1.944 
1,744 
2.09S 
2,170 


29. 14 
34.36 
27.46 
33.16 
34.54 


8 
8 
6 
4 
4 


242 
Sin 
448 
412 
344 
364$ 


6.40 
S.40 
7.40 
7.40 
7.40 


2 

2 
2 
2 




2,058 




2,480 




2.192 




2,510 




2,514 




364 $ 
















' Total 


9,772 


159.46 


6 


2,3465 


38.20 


2 




12.118$ 
1,570,846 























1.582,964$ 



♦The 364$ yards shown for the portable mixers are reinforced concrete, and were placed on the following days: 
September 5th. 70; September 6th, 77; September 7th. 64$; September 8th. 70; September 9th. 83. 

PEDRO MIGUEL LOCKS. 

Concrete work in the locks at Pedro Miguel is about 86 per cent completed, 719,393 cubic 
yards, out of a total of 837,400, bucket measurement, having been placed at the close of work 
on September 9. The record for each of the five 8-hour working days of last week, follows: 





Auxiliary Plant. 


Large 

stone. 






2-cubic yard mixers. | i-cubic yard mixer. 


Total. 




Concrete 
placed. 


Hours No. of.Concrete 
worked, 'mixers! placed. 


Hours 
worked. 


No. of 
mixers 






Cu. Yds. 






Cu. Yds. 






Cu. Yds. 


Cu. Yds. 




614 
414 
638 
524 
354 


16 50 
11.00 
20 00 
17.00 
10.00 


3 
3 
3 
3 
3 










614 




44 


1.25 


1 




458 




638 












524 




252 


11.50 


2 




606 












2.544 


74.50 


3 


296 


12.75 


.6 


4.41 i 


2.840 




716.553 




















4.411 


719.393 

















MIRAFLORES LOCKS. 

Over 29 per cent of the concrete f jr the system of two twin locks at Miraflores was in 
place on September 9, the total amount on that date biing 398,791 cubic yards, bucket 
measurement, out of a total of approximately 1,362,000. The record for each of the five 
8-hour working days of last week, follows: 





Construction Plant. 
2-cubic yard mixers. 


Auxiliary Plant. 




Date. 


2-cubic yard mixers. $-cubic yard mixer. 


Total. 




Concrete 
placed. 


Hours 
worked. 


No. of 
mixers 


Concrete 
placed. 


Hours 
worked. 


No. of Concrete Hours 
mixers' placed. 1 worked. 


No. of 
mixers 


Large 
stone. 




Sept. 4 . . 
Sept. 5. . . 
Sept. 6. . . 
Sept. 7. . . 
Sept. 8. . . 
Sept. 9. . . 


Cu. Yds. 

(holiday) 

1.140 

767 

906 

1,088 

1.140 


24.50 
19. 17 
20.83 
25.50 
30.00 


5 
5 
4 
6 
6 


Cu. Yds. 

1.034 
1.122 
1.012 
1.232 
1.108 






Cu. Yds. 






Cu. Yds. 


Cu. Yds. 


16.06 
17.00 
15.00 
16.23 
14.30 


2 
2 
2 
2 
2 










2,174 


78 
152 
209 
194 


5.00 
13.00 
18.00 
20.00 


1 
3 
3 
3 




1.967 
2.070 
2.529 
2.442 


Total . . 
Previously 
reported . 

Grand 


5,041 


120.00 


5.2 


5,508 


78.59 


2 


633 


56.00 


2 


3,693 


11,182 
387,609 




















3,693 


398,791 























September 13, 1911. 



THE CANAL RECORD 



19 



ORDINANCE 



Providing for the Impounding of Stray Animals. 

Be it enacted by the Isthm'an Cana. Com- 
mission, that the ordinance providing ior the 
impounding of stray animals enacted by said 
Commission at its 143d meeting, held on 
April 27, 1908, and approved by the Secretary 
of War on May 26, 190S, be, and the same is 
hereby amended and reenacted in form, as 
follows: 

1. It shall be unlawful for the owner or 
custodian of any horse, colt, mule, ass, bull, 
steer, cow, ca'f, hog goat, or sheep, to permit 
any such animal to be at large within, or in 
the neighborhood of any labor camp, village, 
or other settlement in the Canal Zone, or on 
any watershed, from which any public water 
supply is obtained, or ..o be staked or tethered 
in such place, or in such manner, as to be, or 
create, a nuisance within, or in the neigh- 
borhood of any labor camp, village, or other 
settlement, or on any watershed. 

2 Any amma found at large or tcthe-ed 
contrary ro the provisions of th= first section 
hereof shall be taken up and impounded by 
the police: Provided, that any such animal 
may be taken up by any private individual 
and delivered to the police for impounding. 
It shall be unlawful for any person to deliver 
to the police for impounding any animal 
other than an an'mal found at large or 
tethered contrary to the provision*- of the 
first section hereof. 

3. Notice of the impounding of any animal 
shall be posted by the police in two conspic- 
uous places in the police district in which 
such animal is impounded, for ten days, in- 
cluding the day upon which the animal is 
impounded. Such notice shall contain a 
description of the animal, and shall state 
where it is impounded, and to whom applica- 
tion should be made for its release. It shall 
also state that if previous application for the 
release of the animal is not made, it will be 
sold before the police station on the tenth 
day from, and including the day on which 
it is impounded, at an hour to be stated in 
the notice. 

It shall be unlawful for any person other 
than the owner or custodian, or agent of the 
owner or custodian, to secure the release of 
any impounded animal 

4. If application for the release of any im- 
pounded animal is not made within eight 
days from and including, the date of its im- 
pounding, the police shall make apph'cation 
to the district judge of the district for 
authority for its sale. If it shall appear to the 
judge that the provisions of this ordinance 
have been complied with, and that the animal 
has not been claimed by the owner or custo- 
dian, he shall enter an order authorizing its 
sale at public cry before the police station of 
the po'ice district ,n which it is -'mpounded 
at the time stated in the notice of impounding 
posted by the police The po'xe shal', there- 
upon se'l the animal at the hour and place 
stated, to the highest bidder, for cash 

5 For each horse, colt mule, ass, bull, or 
cow impounded the r e shall be co'ected one 
do'lar, as a pound fee. and fifty cents per day 
as a maintenance charge; and for each calf 
hog, goat, or sheep fifty cents as a pound 
fee, and twenty-five cents per day as a 
maintenance charge. 

Before the release of any animal to the 
owner or custodian the proper fees and 
charges shall be col'ected from him Upon 



the sa'e of any an'ma under an order of 
court the court costs shal 1 be deducted from 
the amount for which the animal is sold, and 
paid over to the district judge. All amounts 
collected by the police from the owner or 
custodian of any impounded animal or from 
its sale, after paying the costs of court, shall 
be remitted to the treasurer of the Canal Zone 
as Zone revenues. There shall be returned to 
the owner or custodian of any animal sold 
under the provisions of this ordinance, upon 
application therefor made, at any t>me within 
one year from the date of such sale theamount 
for which the animal was sold less the pound 
fees and charges and costs of court. 

6. If any impounded animal is suffering 
from any infectious or contagious disease, or 
from any disease or injury causing great pain, 
or is without value, or if no bid is received 
for any impounded animal offered for sale, 
the police shall immediately make application 
to the district judge for authority to destroy 
it, and the judge shall, if he is satisfied of the 
facts as stated, enter an order authorizing 
its destruction. 

7. The cost of constructing pounds and 
feeding impounded animals shall be paid 
from Canal Zone funds. 

8. Any person violating any provision of 
this ordinance shall be guilty of a misde- 
meanor, and on conviction thereof, shall be 
fined not more than twenty-fiw dollars, or 
imprisoned not longer than thirty days or 
both fined and imprisoned, in the discretion 
of the court. 

9. This ordinance supersedes and repeals 
the provisions of any ordinance, regulation, 
or law in force in the Canal Zone prohibiting 
persons from permitting animals to run at 
large, or providing for impounding such ani- 
mals, and the provisions of any other ordi- 
nance, regulation, or law in force in the Canal 
Zone in conflict with it. 

Enacted by the Isthmian Canal Commission, August 
5, 1911. 

Approved by the Secretary of War, August 22, 1911. 



Opening of Public Schools. 

The Superintendent of Schools announces 
that the public schools of the Canal Zone will 
open on Monday, October 2, at 9 a. m. All 
children of the Canal Zone, whether of em- 
ployes or nonemployes, and all nonresident 
children of employes of the Isthmian Canal 
Commission, are entitled to free school 
privileges. No child will be admitted how- 
ever, who will not be six years old on or before 
February 1, 1912. 

Schools for white children will be opened 
at Ancon, Pedro Miguel, Paraiso, Culebra, 
Empire, Bas Obispo, Gorgona, Gatun, and 
Cristobal. Schools for colored children will 
be opened at Miraflores, Pedro Miguel, 
Paraiso, Cucaracha, Culebra, Empire, Man- 
dingo, Matachin, Gorgona Gatun, Mount 
Hope, Cristobal, Marajal, Cruces. 

Requests should be made to the Superin- 
tendent of Schools, Ancon, immediately, for 
railroad transportation for white children 
living in communities where schools or brake 
service are not provided. 

The teaching force will be composed of 43 
white, and 24 colored and native teachers, 
and there will be two supervisors, in addition 
to the superintendent. Music will be con- 
tinued under the direction of the leader of 
the Commission band. 

The school for colored children at Mara- 
jal, a native village on the Escondido River, 
across Manzanillo Bay from Colon, will be 



conducted in the Catholic church by a native 
teacher, who speaks both Spanish and 
English. There a e about 75 children of 
school age in the settlement, and about 35 
of these are expected to attend. The new- 
school at Mandingo, near Las Cascadas, will 
be held in a remodeled building. There are 
5 children of school age in the settlement. 
The schools at Cucaracha and Miraflores will 
be held in refitted French buildings. The 
teaching of gardening to the colored children 
will be continued. It is planned to add a 
hectare of land to the Empire school garden, 
and some citrus trees will be set out. 



Ancon Rock Crusher. 

A statement of the rock crushed at Ancon 
quarry during the weeks ending September 2 
and 9, follows: 



Date. 


Hours 
worked. 


Cubic 

Yards. 


August 28 . 




7.10 
6.55 
8.35 
7.55 
7.00 
7.10 


2.432 
2.600 
2.87S 
2 60 ' 


August 29 








2,702 
2,439 










Total 


44.45 


15.653 




Date. 


Hours 
worked. 


Cubic 
Yards. 




[Holiday) 






September 5 
September 6 




6.30 
7.30 
7.00 
7.00 


2,282 
2,244 
2.623 








2 360 








Total .... 


37.35 


12,136 











Missing Men. 

Any one having information regarding the 
present whereabouts of Frederick T Harris, 
who left the service of the Isthmian Canal 
Commission on April 18, 1910, is requested 
to communicate with the American Lega- 
tion, Panama. 

Any one having information regarding the 
whereabouts of the following named men, 
who are supposed to have come to the Isthmus 
of Panama, are requested to communicate 
with The Canal Record, Ancon, C.Z.: A. A. 
Ramsey, H. B. Start, George Payne, and 
Thomas G. Gurish. 



Lectures on Health. 

More than five hundred persons attended the 
illustrated lecture on tuberculosis held in the 
large hall on the corner of Cash and D streets, 
Colon on Thursday evening, August 31. 
The lectures are given under the auspices 
of the Cristobal Woman's Club, and are free 
to any who wish to attend. The success of 
the series has been so marked that the organ- 
izers will ask the cooperation of the Canal 
Zone Federation of Women's Clubs, and the 
different local organizations in the Canal Zone, 
to arrange for similar lectures in the American 
villages. Each of the Commission clubhouses 
has the equipment necessary for the exhibit 
of the lantern slides, and any club which will 
guarantee the small expenses incidental to 
the transportation of the slides and the 
machine, will be welcome to the use of them. 
Lectures are being prepared in Spanish and 
in French, with a view to reaching the natives 
and the French speaking people. The next 
lecture will be on the typhoid germ and the 
danger of the house fly. 



The steamship Cristobal will sail from pier 
No. 11, Cristobal, for New York, on Sunday, 
September 17, at 4 p. m. 



20 



THE CANAL RECORD 



Vol. V., No. 3. 



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September 13, 1911 



THE CANAL RECORD 



21 



NEW EXCAVATION ESTIMATE. 

Grand Total for the Entire Canal Placed at 
195.323,379 Cubic Yards. 

The statement of Canal excavation, pub- 
lished in this issue of The Canal Record, 
contains a new estimate of the amount of 
material yet to be removed in each of the 
construction divisions, the total increase 
being 12,785,613 cubic yards over the esti- 
mate of July, 1910, raising the total estimated 
excavation for the entire Canal to 195,323,379 
cubic yards. This addition will not increase 
the estimated cost, as determined in Decem- 
ber, 1908, nor affect the time of completion, 
because the cost per cubic yard has decreased, 
and the capacity per excavating unit has 
increased, as the work has advanced. 

In the Central Division, there have been 
added 5,257,281 cubic yards to allow for slides 
in Culebra Cut, while a deduction of 5S1.003 
cubic yards has been made from the esti- 
mated excavation at other points. The net 
addition to this division is therefore, 4,676,278 
cubic yards. The new estimates for the At- 
lantic and Pacific Divisions include additional 
excavation, due to the silting in the Atlantic 
and Pacific entrances, to small slides that 
have developed in the Canal banks, and to 
minor changes. A statement of the original 
estimate of December, 1908, and the revised 
estimates of July 1, 1910, and September 1, 
1911, follows: 



Divisions. 


1908. 


1910. 


1911. 


Atlantic — 
Wet 
Dry 


Cu. Yds. 

33.515,39') 

9,561.911 


Cu. Yds. 

35,084,291 

8,273,054 


Cu. Yds. 
38,727,675 
8,500.147 


Total 

Central — 
Culebra Cut 
Other 


43,077,310 

78,042.295 
11,752.198 


43,357,345 

84,186,724 

12,938,294 


47,227,822 

89.444.005 
12.357,291 


Total 

Pacific- 
Wet 

Dry 


89,794,493 

35,864.211 
5,930,580 


97.125.01S 

35.675.261 
6,380.142 


101.801.296 

39,362, 1S1 
6.932.080 


Total 


41,794,791 


42,055,403 


46,294,261 


Grand total 


174.666.594 


182,537.766 


195.323.379 



A statement of the amount of excavation 
already done in each division, and the amount 
remaining will be found in the table on the 
fourth page of this issue. 



Material for the Locks. 



New bids have been requested for 127,000 
linear feet of copper conductor bars, with 
copper splice bars, to be used to transmit 
electrical energy to the towing locomotives 
at the locks. The new advertisement is due 
to the fact that no satisfactory bids were 
received on the former advertisement The 
bars must be manufactured from pure copper 
ingots by rolling, drawing, or by the extrusion 
process. The splice bars must be pure rolled 
or drawn copper, having a burnished finish. 
The amounts specified may be increased by 
50 per cent, or decreased by 25 per cent, at the 
option of the Commission. 

The first shipment of steel "T" conductor 
rails for use on the towing tracks at the locks, 
and of steel cross-ties for the towing tracks, 
has been received. Specifications for the 
electric towing locomotives have been for- 
warded to the Washington office, in order that 
bids may be procured on this equipment. 

Advertisement has be n made for 1,500,000 
feet of square vitrified duct, to be used in the 
electric conduit system of the operating tun- 
nels of the locks. The opening in the duct 
must be 3j inches square, and the outside 



dimensions must be not less than 4 7-8, nor 
more than 5 inches. The bulk of the material 
is to be in 18-inch lengths, with two per cent 
of shorter lengths. 



Culebra Cut Slides. 

Steam shovels have been set at work on the 
slide back of the division office at Empire 
excavating the material that has moved into 
Culebra Cut. This slide is unique in that a 
ridge, or steep side of the bank, moved 
toward the prism from the back, and both 
sides at apparently one time. It is estimated 
that three hundred thousand cubic yards of 
material are comprised within the slide, 
although an accurate estimate is impossible, 
owing to the fact that the depth of the moving 
mass cannot be ascertained. 

At Cucaracha village, south of the big 
Cucaracha slide, a flat section of earth has 
b gun to move toward the Canal. The break 
extends back 100 yards from the 95-foot 
berm, and is about 100 yards long on the face. 
The unknown depth of the mass makes a 
careful estimate impossible here also, but it 
is believed that about 150,000 cubic yards 
are in motion. 

So far as interference with the excavation 
work is concerned, the slides in Culebra Cut 
are in more satisfactory condition than 
during any September since 1907. The total 
amount in slides represents about one-fourth 
of the material yet to be removed from 
Culebra Cut. 



PERSONAL. 

Mr. A. B. Nichols left for his annual leave 
in the States on the Colon, which left Cristobal 
on September 5. 

Mr. James C. Courts, Clerk of the House 
Committee on Appropriations, with his 
daughter, arrived on the Cristobal on Sep- 
tember 7. While on the Isthmus, Mr. Courts 
will assist in preparing the annual estimates 
for the Isthmian Canal Commission. 



Gatun Dam Spillway. 

The concrete work in the Spillway of Gatun 
Dam is about 69 per cent completed, 154,570 
cubic yards, out of a total of 225,000, having 
been placed at the close of work on September 
9. A statement of the amount laid each 
working day last week, and of the total in 
place, follows: 



Date. 


Concrete 
Laid. 


Hours 
worked. 


No. 
M ixers. 










172 
164 
160 
118 
148 


16,00 2 


September 6 


10.30 ; 2 
8.00 | 1 




6.30 




8.00 


2 


Total 

Previously reported. . . 


162 

153.808 


49.00 


1.60 




154.570 













Organization of a Rifle Club. 
There will be a meeting in the Ancon lodge 
hall on Sunday, September 17, at 10 a. m., 
for the purpose of organizing a rifle and pistol 
club, to be affiliated with the National Rifle 
Association of America. All citizens of the 
United States residing in Ancon and Corozal, 
who are interested, are invited to attend. 



Balboa Dock Construction. 

Forty of the 53 caissons for the new Pan- 
ama railroad dock at Balboa are under con- 
struction, -5 have been sunk to bed rock, and 
12 have been filled with concrete to the desired 



point, namely, 10 feet below sea level. It is 
expected that the work of placing the girders 
for the superstructure will be started within 
the next two weeks. The work schedule of 
July 17, which provided for day and night 
shifts, is still in effect. The men on the night 
force are mostly engaged in excavating for 
the caissons, the concrete work being carried 
on only in the daylight hours. A force is also 
kept on the work Sundays. 

Porto Bello Crusher. 
A statement of the work done at the Porto 
Bello crusher by days, for the week ending 
September 9, follows: 



Date. 


Hours 
worked. 


Cubic 
Yards. 




September 5 

September 6 


4.03 
4.30 
5.15 
5.46 
4.11 

23.45 . 


1.565 
1.677 
1,938 




2,186 




1,603 


Total 


8,969 





Work of Unloaders in Central Division. 

The following statement shows the num- 
ber of Lidgerwood cars unloaded by the 
Central Division during the month of August, 
1911: 



Location - . 


No. of 
unloaders. 


No. of 
trains. 


No. of 
cars. 


Balboa 


3 
3 

4 


1.062 

784 

1.172 


21.240 
15,680 
24,610 






Total 


10 


3.018 


61,530 





Married. 

BENSON-MITCHELL— On the Sth of September, 
in Cristobal, Robey W. Benson of Baltimore, Md„ 
to Carolyn A. Mitchell of Hamilton, Md., the Rev. 
Carl H. Elliott officiating. Canal Zone residence, 
Cristobal. 

BOWES-BOVVSER— On the 11th of September in 
the I. C. C. chapel, Cristobal, George Lester Bowes 
to Alice Jane Bowser, both of Lock Haven. Pa., the 
Rev. Carl H. Elliott officiating. Canal Zone residence, 
San Pablo. 

YVIKINGSTAD-HOLDEN— On the 11th of Sep- 
tember in Cristobal, Knut Mathias Wikingstad of 
Brooklyn, N. Y., to Anna Maria Holden of Christi- 
anson, Norway, the Rev. Carl H. Elliott officiating. 
Canal Zone residence, Cristobal. 

ELDER-GEER — In the Commission chapel, Cris- 
tobal, on July 11, Garnet Geer to Ralph Elder, the 
Rev. Carl H. Elliott officiating. Canal Zone residence, 
Cristobal. 

Band Concert. 

A concert will be given by the Isthmian Canal Com- 
mission Band at Gorgona, C. Z.. on Sunday, Septem- 
ber 17, 1911, at 6 p. m. The program follows: 

1. March — Ideal Reeves 

2. Selection — The Dollar Princess (by request) . .Fall 

3. Intermezzo — Elegante from Tales of 

Hoffman (by request) .... Offenbach 
-i. Overture — Morning, Noon, and Night 

in Vienna Suppe 

5. Flower song — Hearts and Flowers 

(by request) Tobani 

6. Waltz — Casino Tame Gung'l 

7. Serenade — La Paloma (by request) Xradier 

8. Popular medley — Remick's Hits Lampe 

9. March — Unter den Siegesbanner Von Blon 

Charles E. Jennings, Musical Director. 
The next concert will be given at Empire, C. Z., on 
September 24 at 6 p. m. 



Tide Table. 

The following table shows the time of high and low 
tides at Panama for the week ending September 20, 
1911 (75th meridian time): 



Date. 


Low. 


High. 


Low. 


High. 


Low. 


September 14 . . . 
September 15 . . . 
September 16 . . . 
September 17 . . . 


A.M. 
1.10 
1.55 
2.50 
3.55 
5.15 


A.M. 
7.10 
7.55 
8.50 
10.00 
11.20 


P.M. 
2.37 
2.30 
3.27 
4 35 
5.55 
A.M. 
6.35 
7.45 


P.M. 
7.37 
8.30 
9.30 
10.45 


P.M. 






12.15 
1.25 


12.40 

1.50 


7.10 
8.10 



22 



THE CANAL RECORD 



Vol. V., No. 3. 



SOCIAL LIFE OF THE ZONE. 



Women's Clubs — Plans for the Club Year. 

A meeting of the executive board of the 
Canal Zone Federation of Women's Clubs 
was held at Cristobal on Friday afternoon, 
September 8, when plans for the club year 
were discussed, and arrangements for the 
annual meeting in January were made. The 
sale of the cook book has been completed 
with a profit of about $50, which has been 
added to the club treasury. The librarian 
reported the progress of work with the 
juvenile library, which is now in Gorgona. 
The board authorized the enlargement of the 
art collection. This collection, which is 
handled by the librarian, has already been 
exhibited at one of the schools, and it will be 
offered as a traveling exhibit to be shown at 
any of the public schools in the Zone during 
the school year. A committee was appointed 
to take charge of the purchase of the usual 
Christmas gifts for the inmates of the leper 
colony. A supply of pins will be ordered, and 
members of the federated clubs will be able 
to purchase these from the treasurer at, or 
before, the annual meeting. 

The January meeting will be held at Cris- 
tobal on the 20th or 27th, and will be in two 
sessions — the business meeting, with election 
of officers, in the morning; and the program 
meeting, with addresses and a reception, in 
the afternoon. 

The Cristobal Woman's Club will resume 
meetings after the four months' recess on 
Wednesday afternoon, September 27, when 
there will be a general reception to the out- 
going and incoming officers. Following this, 
the meetings will be held semimonthly, as 
usual. The work of the committees for the 
year is outlined, as follows: The seven meet- 
ings of the art and literature department will 
be devoted to the study of paintings and mas- 
ters, folk song, and folk lore. Mrs. R W. Hart 
is chairman. The home department, with 
Mrs. Edward Beverly as chairman, will study 
home life in Switzerland, England, and Japan. 
The department will also have charge of three 
programs for the general meeetings of the 
club, and will have one lecture on the history 
of furniture and rugs, and one on modern 
domestic science. There will be other ad- 
dresses on education and the child, women 
in philanthropy, modern tendencies toward 
the preservation of life and health. Among 
the speakers will be Miss Alice Alexander, 
the Rev. Carl H. Elliott, Judge Thomas E. 
Brown Jr., and Dr. A. J. Orenstein. The meet- 
ings of the club are, as follows : A general meet- 
ing with program on the first Wednesday in 
each month meetingof the home department 
on the second Wednesday, art and literature 
department on the third Wednesday; and a 
meeting of the executive board on the fourth 
Wednesday. The officers for the year are: 
President. Mrs. Carl H. Elliott; first vice- 
president, Mrs. Thomas E. Brown, Jr.; 
si i-ond vice-president, Mrs. E. H. Colip; 
recording secretary, Mrs. Max Culbertson; 
corresponding secretary', Mrs. Charles But- 
lers; treasurer, Mrs. Fred Guderian. Mrs. 
R. G. Whittaker is chairman of the educa- 
tional department, and Mrs. L. E. Willson 
chairman of the philanthropy department. 
The house and social committees have as 
chairmen, Mrs Webster Morris and Mrs. 
E. K. Turner. Mrs. William H. Bell is chair- 



man of the special committee on the free 
educative lectures on tuberculosis. 

The meetings of the Gatun Woman's Club 
will be resumed on September 27. During 
the absence of the president, Mrs. W. H. 
Martin, the first vice-president, will act in 
her place. The plans for the work of the club 
will be given at the first meeting. 

The Empire Woman's Club held its first 
meeting with the study of China and India, 
on Thursday afternoon, September 7. The 
work is outlined to continue through the year. 

The Paraiso Woman's Club resumed its 
regular meeting on Wednesday afternoon, 
September 6. The club will continue to work 
along the lines of last year. The meetings 
will be held on the first and third Wednesday 
afternoons in each month. Efforts will be 
made to continue the social side by giving 
entertainments from time to time. Current 
events will be a part of the program of each 
meeting. The following officers were elected: 
President, Mrs. C. E. Hennigh- vice-president, 
Mrs. H. Bain; secretary, Mrs. E. H. Couter- 
marsh; treasurer, Mrs. George Ruggles. 



Church Notes. 
The annual meeting of the Woman's 
Foreign Missionary Society of the Methodist 
Episcopal church of the city of Panama was 
held at the home of Mrs. E. H. Keyser on 
Thursday afternoon, September 7. The 
society welcomed Mrs. Harry Compton, the 
wife of the pastor of the church, who arrived 
on the Isthmus, with her daughter, on the 
Colon on August 31. A special program of 
vocal and instrumental music was given. The 
officers elected are: President, Mrs. Compton; 
vice-president, Mrs. J. H. Stokoe; secretary, 
Miss Elsie Keyser; treasurer, Mrs. Walter 
Bray, with the additional duty of treasurer 
of the mite boxes. At the next meeting, 
which will be held at the parsonage on the 
sea wall on Thursday, October 5, the study 
of the new text book, "The light of the world," 
will be begun. This is the third book that has 
been taken up by the society. The study 
work was begun in October, 1909. 

Mrs. Compton will have charge of the 
Methodist college on the sea wall, Panama. 
She will begin her duties this month, and will 
prepare for the extension of the work in 
October, when classes will be established in 
domestic science for girls, and in manual 
training for boys. The monthly communion 
service will be held in the Methodist church 
on the first Sunday in October. 

The Ladies' Aid Society of the Cristobal 
Christian League held its meeting at the home 
of the Rev. Carl H. Elliott on Thursday, 
September 7. The society is engaged in the 
systematic study of missionary work in 
foreign fields. 

The Rev. Henry Haigh, president of the 
Wesleyan Methodist Conference, accom- 
panied by Mrs. Haigh and their daughter, 
and Miss Hodson Smith, left England on 
August 2 for a tour of the mission stations 
of the church in the West Indies, British 
Guiana, and the Isthmus of Panama. They 
were accompanied by the Rev. Hodson 
Smith, the Rev. J H. Moulton of Didsbury 
College, Manchester, and Mr. Henry Bis- 
seker of Birmingham. The party arrived in 
Colon on September 4, and public meetings 
were held in honor of the president, both in 
Panama and Colon. They sailed on Septem- 
ber 5 for Jamaica for a two weeks' stay, and 



will proceed to Toronto, Canada, to attend 
the meetings of the Methodist Ecumenical 
Conference. 

The Rev. Jesse R. Bicknell, chaplain at 
Ancon Hospital and the Protestant chapel, 
sailed on the Colon on September 5, to return 
to his former post as assistant priest at St. 
Paul's mission church, Baltimore Major 
Henry A. Brown, chaplain, Engineer Corps 
U. S. A., has been appointed in his place. 
The Episcopal church services at Trinity 
mission, Culebra, will be discontinued for the 
present. 

Red Cross Endowment and Finances. 

The following committee was appointed 
by Miss Mabel Boardman of the executive 
committee of the American National Red 
Cross, some months ago, to raise the sum of 
$700, to be contributed by the Canal Zone 
Chapter, for the Endowment Fund of the 
American National Red Cross. The com- 
mittee has completed its labors, and, on 
September 9, the sum of $709.63 was for- 
warded to the headquarters of the American 
National Red Cross at Washington. The 
committee gave various entertainments, and, 
with the assistance of the members of the 
Canal Zone Chapter, its efforts have met 
with success: 

Dr. A. J. Orenstein, Ancon; Alexander P. 
Crary Corozal; J. T. Smith, Pedro Miguel; 
Edw. Schildhauer, Culebra; T. L. Clear, 
Empire; J. B. Fields, Las Cascadas; W. B. 
Wheeler, Bas Obispo; B. M. Litt, Gorgona; 
Dr. Geo. H. Gorham, Tabernilla; Major 
Chester Harding, Gatun; Wm. F. Bennyhoff, 
Cristobal. 

The financial statement of the Canal Zone 
Chapter, American National Red Cross, for 
the month of August, follows: 

RECEIPTS. 

August 1. On hand $3,101.19 

August 3. Return of amount loaned 

to Spaniard who went 

to Cuba — See June 

statement 32.95 

August 18. Return of amount loaned 

the Baptist minister at 

Colon— See P. R. R. 

bill, 3,389 30.00 

August 31, Membership dues during 

August 10.00 

Total receipts $3,174.14 

DISBURSEMENTS. 

August 14, Relief of a family of a 

conductor at Empire. . 30.00 

August 19, Advance for expenses of 
sending the three Bes- 
ley children from Tab- 
ernilla to their home 
in Jamaica 25.00 

August 21. Relief of destitute dentist 

at Las Cascadas 40.00 

Total disbursements S 95.00 

August 31, Balance on hand S3.079.14 

Approved: John L. Phillips. Treasurer. 

C. A. Devol, Chairman. 

Specimens of fossils collected by the Com- 
mission geologist have been sent to the Smith- 
sonian Institution, where they will be identi- 
fied by W. H. Dall, the authority on tertiary 
fossils. The specimens are early tertiary 
fossils, some of which belong to the oligocene, 
and they will be identified for reference to 
the subdivisions of middle and late tertiary 
times. 

Paper sanitary drinking cups have been 
placed in the coaches of the Panama railroad, 
and the common cup has been abolished. 
The cups are also on sale at the commissary 
stores for five cents a dozen. 



September 13, 1911. 



THE CANAL RECORD 



23 



COMMISSION CLUBHOUSES. 



Activities of the Young Men's Christian Associ- 
ation. 

Following is the schedule for the moving picture 
entertainments for the week of September 18 to 23: 
Monday, Gatun; Tuesday, Cristobal; Wednesday, 
Gorgona; Thursday, Corozal; Friday, Empire; Sat- 
urday, Culebra. 

Following is the standing of the Isthmian bowling 
league tournament, now in progress: 



Cristobal . 
Empire . . 
Marines. . 
Gorgona . 
Gatun . . . 
Culebra . . 



n. 


Lost. 


P. c. 


8 


4 


.667 


S 


4 


.667 


7 


5 


.583 


6 


6 


.500 


5 


7 


.416 


3 


9 


.333 



CULEBRA. 

The gymnasium class meets every Wednesday 
evening, and will be followed by basketball. 

The following are the results of the league games 
bowled at Culebra with the M arines from Camp Elliott ; 

Culebra. Camp Elliott. 
Leylander.. 103 1S4 McDowell.. 133 163 144 
Bronson 137 126 Austin 187 160 142 



Huttlemaier 167 160 183 

Fleishman. . 164 137 162 

Sickler 136 136 1S4 

Wheeler 139 125 



Meyers 116 134 145 

Clause 171 152 117 

Martins 117 149 160 



Total 707 718 838 724 75S 70S 

At Camp Elliott, Culebra took two out of three 
games. The following high scores were rolled in duck- 
pins during the week: Huttlemaier, 105, 110, 114, 126; 
Mitchell, 106. 108. 

EMPIRE. 

The following scores of 200, or over, were bowled, 
during the past week: Tenpins — Pinney. 204, 204; 
Parkis, 214. 202. 202; Huson, 203, 223; Goolsby, 201. 
201. Duckpins— Dakin. 104, 100; Rodeghiero, 102, 131 

The league game bowled on the Empire alleys on 
Saturday. September 9, resulted in Empire winning 
two out of three games from Cristobal. The scores 
were, as follows: 



Empire. 
Sawtelle.. .. 180 181 153 

Spinks 193 186 146 

Gorham 164 193 173 

Pearson 153 146 149 

Huson 194 173 158 



Cristobal. 

Barrett .... 155 13S 134 

Collins 199 177 155 

Burns 115 188 143 

Bullard 176 244 179 

Louch 199 169 167 



Total 884 879 779 844 916 778 

The subject for discussion by the literary society for 
September 15 will be "The middleman." 

Next Saturday night, September 16, there will be 
another "Open house." A musical program will be 
given, and refreshments will be served. On Sunday, 
September 17, there will be an informal "Sing" at 
9 o'clock. 

GORGONA. 

The "smoker" and Labor Day celebration on Monday 
night, September 4, was well attended. Songs were 
sung, and toasts, in the form of tributes to labor, were 
heard from leading men in the various crafts employed 
in Gorgona. Moving pictures were also shown, and 
refreshments were served 

In the second contest of the Isthmian bowling league 
rolled on the Gorgona alleys, Gatun lost two out of 
three games to the local team. The scores were, as 
follows: 

1st game. 2nd game. 3d game. 

Gatun 758 768 891 

Gorgona 787 797 722 

The high bowling scores for the week ending Sep- 
tember 9 are, as follows: Glow, 207; Sims. 203; 
Haldeman, 215. 



A record of the games bowled on the Gatun alleys 
on Saturday, September 9, follows: 
Gorgona. 

Arnold 120 

Sims 192 

Orr 157 

Burns 142 

Haldeman 167 



Gatun. 

Omeara 155 

Chamberlain 157 

Galloway 165 

Green 157 

Barte . .167 



Total 801 786 791 2,378 

The orchestra from the Prinz August Wilhelm gave a 
concert at the clubhouse on Tuesday night. The attend- 
ance was about 300. 

The gymnasium classes will be in charge of J. T. 
Hopkins of Gorgona on Tuesday and Friday nights 
of each week at 8 o'clock. The exercises will consist of 







Total 


166 


136 


422 


174 


166 


532 


143 


112 


.-412 


179 


171 


492 


170 


107 


444 


832 


692 


2.302 
Total 


181 


145 


481 


163 


170 


490 


136 


125 


426 


159 


165 


481 


147 


186 


500 



marching, calisthenics, mat work, and recreative games. 
Miss Harris has been engaged to play the piano. 

The entertainment to be given under the auspices 
of the Spanish War Veterans on Saturday. September 9, 
was postponed, and will be given on September 16. A 
cordial invitation is extended to all who wish to attend. 

Gatun won two games from the Gorgona bowling 
team on Saturday night. The scores were, as follows: 

Total. 

Gorgona 778 832 692 2.302 

Gatun 801 786 791 2.378 

CRISTOBAL. 

Owing to the postponement of the debating club 
session on September 6. the topic for discussion 
which was assigned for September 13. will be debated 
on Wednesday, September 20 — "Resolved, that the 
present banking laws are inimical to our republican 
form of government." 

During the month of August, 3.122 games were 
bowled on the bowling alleys. The match game in the 
Isthmian bowling tournament, bowled on the alleys 
on Saturday night, between Empire and Cristobal 
teams, resulted in Empire taking two out of the three 
games rolled, the scores being as follows: 

Empire. Cristobal. 

Parkis 151 184 210 Gibson 176 178 137 

Pinney 152 178 157 Blackburn.. 198 141 164 

Anderson 198 145 166 Wallace.... 181 133 

Davis .' 235 138 134 Wheeler 147 155 138 

Giavelli .... 146 182 137 Furlong.... 209 170 141 
Grover 118 

Total ... 882 827 804 911 777 698 

PORTO BELLO. 

The results of the recent tournament, follow: 

Played. Won. Lost. P. C. 

McDevitt 5 4i i .900 

Hanbury 8 6J » -813 

Morgan 10 8 2 .800 

Tuttle 10 8 2 .800 

Gaskill 10 5} 4! .550 

Mackintosh 10 4J 5£ .450 

Colberg 7 3 4 .429 

Corrigan 7 3 4 .429 

Wright 8 21 54 .313 

Cornelison 3 i 2) .167 

Goodfellow S 1 7 .125 

Rogers 7 7 .000 



OFFICIAL CIRCULARS. 



Rainfall from September 1 to 9, 1911, Inclusive 



Pacific Section — 

Ancon 

Balboa 

♦Miratiores 

Pedro Miguel 

Rio Grande 

Central Section — 

Culebra 

*Camacho 

Empire 

Gamboa 

*Juan Mina 

Alhajuela 

*E1 Vigia 

*Gorgona 

San Pablo 

Tabernilla 

Bohio 

♦Monte Lirio 

Atlantic Section — 

Gatun 

*Brazos Brook 

Cristobal 

Porto Bello 



Ins. 

.96 

1.51 

1 05 

.92 
.77 

.78 
.70 
.64 
.63 
.91 

111 
.94 
.58 
.44 
.35 
.46 

2.00 

.38 

.67 

1.54 

3.47 



rt ft) 

o a 
H 



Ins. 
2.05 
3.34 
3.18 
3.21 
3.05 

2.69 
2.96 
2.35 
2.12 
3.39 
2.87 
2.41 
1.64 
1.16 
0.84 
1.16 
3.56 

0.96 

1.95 
2.93 

4.81 



♦Standard rain gage — readings at 5 p. m. daily. 
Automatic rain gage at unstarred stations — value 
midnight to midnight. tTo 5 p. m., September 7. 



Stages of the Chagres. 

Maximum heights of the Chagres River for the week 
ending midnight, Saturday, September 9. 1911. All 
heights are in feet above mean sea level. 







Station. 








Day and Date. 


Vigia. 


£ 1 

3 
'c? 


rt 

o 

£ 


6 


3 3 






















< 


O 


a 


OJ 




Sun., Sept. 3. . . 


126.4 


93.0 


46.8 


15.4 


is 


1 


Mon.. Sept. 4. 


126.2 


92. S 


46.6 


15.2 


i.i 


2 


Tues.. Sept. 5.-. 


127,4 


93 7 


47.2 


15.0 


15 





Wed.. Sept. 6. . 


127 


93.6 


47 1 


15.0 


14 


8 


Thurs..Sept. 7 . 


126.3 


93.0 


46.6 


14.8 


14 


8 


Fri.. Sept. 8. . . . 


127.8 


93 7 


46.7 


14.8 


14 


6 


Sat.. Sept. 9. . . 


127.5 


93.7 


47.0 


14.8 


14 


5 


Height of low 














water 


125.0 


92 


44.0 









Record of Oil Issued. 

Culebra. C. Z., September 5, 1911. 
Heads of Departments and Divisions: 

Circulars Nos. 314 and 314-A direct that a record of 
oil issued to various pieces of equipment shall be kept 
by each division, and a statement of same compiled 
monthly, copies of which shall be sent to those directly 
concerned, and to me. 

On December 19. 1910, a circular letter to the 
Heads of Departments and Divisions was issued, 
calling attention to the above requirements of circulars 
Nos. 314 and 314-A. and stating further that "By 
January 1, 1911, all plant and equipment of the Isth- 
mian Canal Commission and Panama Railroad Com- 
pany, including stationary,- plants, etc., will have been 
given approved monthly allowances of oils, greases, 
and waste, and, subsequent to that date, it is desired 
that two copies of monthly reports of lubricants used 
on each item of equipment, plant, etc., be forwarded 
promptly at the close of each month to me." 

Circular No. 290-C. prescribing the use of form No. 
C. E. 303 by engineers, or other employes in charge 
of the operation of any piece of equipment, in drawing 
all lubricants, etc., from division supply stations. 
stated also that "At the end of each month the requests 
filled shall be used in compiling report on forms 
C. E. 273-Aand 273-B of lubricating oil. etc., consumed 
on each item of equipment." 

These reports are exceedingly useful to the traveling 
engineers and the inspector attached to this office in 
their inspection of lubricant consumption. In some 
cases, however, certain of the divisions and depart- 
ments have not forwarded any reports; in other cases, 
only one copy is received; and in practically all cases, 
there is considerable delay in forwarding these reports. 

It is hoped that it will not be necessary to again 
invite attention to this matter, and that, in the future, 
these reports will be submitted promptly, and in the 
manner prescribed. 

Geo. W. Goethals, 
Chairman. Isthmian Canal Commission. 
President, Panama Railroad Company. 



Telegraph Operators. 
Culebra. C. Z.. September 6, 1911. 
Circular No. 299-o: 

The following designations and rates of pay are 
authorized, in addition to those published in circular 
No. 299: 

Designation. Unit. 

Operator (telegraph) Month 

Operator (telegraph) Month 

Geo. W. 



Rate of Pay. 
$137.50 
150.00 
Goethals. 



Chairman and Chief Engineer. 



Surcharge to Marine Camp. 

Culebra, C Z.. September 1, 1911. 
Circular No. 169-j (Corrected): 

Effective this date, the same surcharge will apply 
on material and labor furnished the Marine Battalion 
at Camp Elliott as on material and labor furnished 
the Government of the Canal Zone. 

Geo. W. Goethals, 
Chairman and Chief Engineer. 



August Rainfall for Three Years. 



Station. 



Pacific Seclion- 

Ancon 

Balboa 

Miraflores 
Pedro Miguel . 
Rio Grande.. . 
Central Section- 

Culebra 

Camacho 

Empire 

Gamboa 

Alhajuela 

El Vigia 

Gorgona 

San Pablo 

Tabernilla. . . . 

Bohio 

Trinidad 

Monte Lirio . . 
Atlantic Sec- 

Gatun 

Brazos Brook. 

Cristobal 

Porto Bello . . . 
Nombre de D 



1909 


6 


84 


6 


86 


6 


4(1 


10 


07 


9 


12 


s 


32 


8 


03 


7 


20 


7 


03 


X 


15 


11 


24 


x. 


45 


9 


04 


9 


78 


to 


01 


9 


50 


s 


39 



9.92 
10.67 

15.42 
13.83 
12 15 



1910 


1911 


bo 
n 

V 

> 
< 
c 
_o 
33 
rt 

55 


o 
u 

V 

*o 

m 

k, 
01 

01 

>• 


12.00 


7.21 


7.61 


15 


10.85 


8.50 


7.61 


13 


11.97 


7.06 


8.50 


3 


10.08 


5.43 


8.72 


4 


,8.98 


8.17 


9.93 


. 


10.11 


8.36 


10.46 


20 


10.75 


7.98 


9.87 


6 


10.08 


5.98 


9.62 


8 


10.66 


7.68 


12.04 


29 


13.43 


10.79 


13.10 


13 


15.01 


12.56 


12.94 


3 


10.84 


8.51 


11.88 


8 


13.06 


7.21 


10.20 


5 


11.07 


8.40 


10.32 


5 


14.84 


5 . 60 


14.77 


17 


12.03 


S.17 


12.18 


4 


13.68 


9.58 


11.88 


4 


13.85 


7.91 


14.73 





13.56 


12.19 


14.73 


6 


14.93 


11.60 


15.13 


41 


20.71 


22.56 


18.52 


4 


9.63 


11.70 


11.16 


3 



19 

is 
26 

J" 
J'. 

27 
27 
26 
26 
27 
26 
27 
28 
29 
27 
22 
30 

23 
29 

27 
25 
22 



24 



THE CANAL RECORD 



Vol. V., No. 3. 



COMMISSARY DEPARTMENT. 

The open hours at Culebra commissary are from 
8 a. m. to 1 p. m., and from 3 p. m. to 7 p. m.; at 

Balboa commissary, the hours are from 8a. m.to 12.30 
p. m., and from 2.30 to 7. p. m. All other commissaries 
are open from 8 a. m. to 1 p. m. and 3 p. m. to 7 
p. m., with the exception of the Cristobal commissary, 
which is open from 8 a. m. to 12.30 p. m., and from 2 
p. m. to 7 p. m. 

Retail prices of cold storage provisions for the week 
beginning September 13. 

fresh MEATS. Price. 

Mutton — Stewing, per pound 6 

Shoulder, neck trimmed off, (4 pounds 

and over) , per pound 9 

Entire forequarter (not trimmed), 10 

pounds and over, per pound 8 

Leg (S to 10 pounds) , per pound 17 

Cutlets, per pound 18 

Short cut chops, per pound 20 

Lamb — Stewing, per pound 6 

Entire forequarter, neck trimmed off, 

per pound 9 

Leg (5 to 8 pounds) , per pound 20 

Chops, per pound 24 

Cutlets, per pound 24 

Veal — Stewing, per pound 10 

Shoulder, for roasting (not under 4 

pounds), per pound 12J 

Chops, shoulder, per pound 16 

Chops, per pound 24 

Loin, for roasting, per pound 24 

Cutlets, per pound 28 

Pork — Loin chops or roast, per pound 18 

Beef — Suet, per pound 2 

Soup, per pound 5 

Stew, per pound ■ . . 8 

Corned, No. 1, per pound 12 

Corned, No. 2, per pound 10 

Chuck roast (3 pounds and over), per 

pound 12 

Pot roast, per pound 12§ 

Rib roast, second cut (not under 3 J 

pounds) , per pound 16 

Rib roast, first cut (not under 3 pounds), 

per pound 18 

Sirloin roast, per pound 19 

Rump roast, per pound 19 

Porterhouse roast, per pound 20 

Steak, chuck, per pound 12 % 

Round, per pound 13 

Rib, per pound 18 

Sirloin, per pound 19 

Rump, per pound 19 

Porterhouse (not less than 1 £ 

pounds), per pound 20 

Tenderloin (Western), per pound. 24 

MISCELLANEOUS. 

Caviare, Russian, per tin 47. 89 

Livers — Beef, per pound 7 

Calf, each 60 

Half, each 30 

Steak, Hamburger, pkg 13 

Sjusage — Bologna, per pound 10 

Frankfurter, per pound 12 

Lieberwurst, per pound 10 

Devonshire Farm 17 

Sweetbread — Veal, per pound 1 . 20 

Beef, per pound 25 

Eggs, fresh, dozen 28 

one-half dozen only 15 

Bluefish, fresh, per pound 14 

Halibut, fresh, per pound 15 

Shads, fresh, each 70 

Shad roes, fresh, per pair 35 

POULTRY AND GAME. 

Chickens — Fancy roasting, milk fed, large, each 1.25 

Fancy roasting, milk fed, med., each 1.00 
Fancy roasting, corn fed, about 4£ 

pounds, each 90 

Fowls, each 60, 70, 80, 90, 1 . 00 

Ducks, Western, about 4£ pounds, each 1.00 

Broilers, milk fed, each 60 

corn fed, each 55 

Turkeys, per pound 26 

Squabs, each 35 

Capons, each 2.10 

Fryers, corn fed, each 60 

Partridges, each 50 

Grouse, each 50 

CURED AND PICKLED MEATS. 

Ham — German, Westphalia, per pound 36 

Sugar cured , per pound 18 

Sliced, per pound 20 

Half, for boiling, per pound 19 

Boiled, per pound 26 

Hocks, per pound J8 

Bacon — Breakfast, whole piece, per pound 22 

Breakfast, sliced, per pound 23 

Pork, salt family, per pound 13 

Ox tongues, each 1 . 00 

Pigs' feet, per pound 9 

Tongues, per pound 18 

Sliced bacon in 1-pound tins, per tin 30 

In 1-pound jars, per jar 30 

DAIRY PRODUCTS. 

Batter — Creamery special, per pound 32 

Cheese — Roquefort, per pound 38 

Philadelphia cream, cake 18 

Young America, per pound 18 

Swiss, per pound 26 

Edam, each 1.00 



Price. 

Neufchatel , cake 6 

Gouda. per pound 34 

Milk (Certified), per bottle **25 

Buttermilk, bottle **15 

Fer-mil-lac, bottle **25 

Ice cream, quart t25 

^-gallon J50 

VEGETABLES AND FRUITS. 

Beets, per pound 3 

Celery, per head / 6 

Cabbage, per pound 3 

Cucumbers, per pound 3 

Carrots, pei pound *3 

Cauliflower, per pound *12 

Lettuce, per pound 12 

Onions, per pound 3 4 

Potatoes, white, per pound 4 

sweet, per pound 2 

Pears, alligator, each 6 

Peppers, green, per pound 7 

Rhubarb, per pound J4 

Turnips, per pound *3 

Tomatoes, per pound 4 

Yams, per pound 3 

Apples, per pound 10 

Cantaloupes, each 8 

Grapes, per pound flO 

Lemons, dozen 24 

Limes, per 1 00 80 

Oranges. California, per dozen 42 

Pears, per pound *7 

Peaches, pound 6 

Plums, per pound *7 

Watermelons, each 30 

indicates reduction from last list. 
**Indicates 5 cents allowed for return of bottle. 
"Vindicates advance on last list. 

tSold only from commissaries; no orders taken for 
delivery 

Supplies for Canal Work. 

The following steamers, with supplies for the Isth- 
mian Canal Commission, arrived at the ports of Cris- 
tobal, Colon, and Balboa, during the week ending 
September 9: 

Prins August Wilhelm, September 4, from New 
York, with 29 cases paper, 17 bundles turnbuckles. for 
stock; 50 bundles castings for Mechanical Division. 

Cristobal, September 6, from New York, with 150.200 
bags cement for Atlantic and Pacific Divisions- 

Gibraltar, September 6. from New York, with 121,900 
bags cement for Atlantic and Pacific Divisions. 

Santa Maria, September 7, from New York, with 
21 cases fuse, 170 drums oil, 414 bags oats, for stock 

Turrialha. September 7, from New Orleans, with 9 
pieces yellow pine lumber and 464 pieces ties for Pacific 
Division; 141 pieces piling for Atlantic Division; 
28,331 pieces yellow pine lumber and 219 pieces white 
oak lumber for Mechanical Division; 3,935 pieces 
yellow pine lumber, 300 drums kerosene, 934 bales hay, 
75 bags sucrene feed. 15 pieces spring frogs. 200 pieces 
switch stands, 8 cases switch stands, for stock. 

Geo. W. Fen-wick, September 7. from Hoquiam, Wn. 
with 20.589 pieces Douglas fir lumber and 2,020 cross* 
ties for stock. 

Vimeira, September 9, from Moss Point. Miss., with 
35,546 pieces cross-ties for stock. 

Misdirected Letters. 

The following insufficiently addressed letters, origi- 
nating in the United States and its possessions, have 
been received in the office of the Director of Posts, 
and may be secured upon request of the addressee: 
Agneu, Jos. M. Lamontagne, Wilfred 

Almour, G. W. Louis, Wm. N. 

Barrow, Samuel Maloney. John A. 

Bizzelle. Mrs. Emma McMullin, Nellie 

Brubaker. V. C. Markham. A. V. 

Bruggs, William Martin, Mrs. A. 

Burrow. J. O. Marvin. William P.. Sr. 

Carlisle, P. B. Mellon, Robert 

Clouse, Rov (2) Miller, Charles C. 

Collier. W. W., Jr. Moore, Miss Alice (2) 

Collins, Cleveland Morgali.Mr. & Mrs.Rolp 

Dale, Charles Myric, James 

Douglas, John O'Connell, Rev. H. 

Ebdinger. Mrs. A. Quinn, William P. 

Engelsberg Bros. Renaud. Ernest 

Foster, Frank Rosenquist, Albert 

Goodale, Wm. A. Smith, Fred C. 

Hahnewald. E. R. (2d class) Urban. A. E. 
James, Samuel W. Veenschoten, Vincent V. 

Kelly, L. W. Wilson, Wm. T. 



MOVEMENT OF OCEAN VESSELS. 



The following vessels arrived at, or departed from 
the port of Balboa during the week ending September 
9: 

Arrivals — September 4, Manavi. from Buenaven- 
tura; Urubamba, from C^Wso-.Quilpue , fromValparaiso; 
G. W. Fenwick, Manga Reva, San Josd, from San Fran- 
cisco. 

Departures — September 4, Ucayalt. to Callao; 
September 6, Ecuador, to Guayaquil; Kansas City, to 
San Francisco; September 7. Newport, to San Fran- 
cisco; Aysen. to Valparaiso; September 8, Chile, to 
Guayaquil; September 9, Urubamba. to Callao. 



The following is a list of the sailings of the Panama 
Railroad Steamship Company; of the Royal Mail 
Steam Packet Company; of the Hamburg-American 
Line, and of the United Fruit Company's Line; the 
Panama Railroad Company's dates being subject to 
change. 

NEW YORK TO CRISTOBAL. 

P. R. R... Monday. 

P. R. R... Monday. 

P. R. R... Saturday 

P. R. R 

P. R. R 

Colon P. R. R 

Allianca P. R. R 

Panama P. R. R 



Advance 
Colon. . . 
Allianca. 
Panama. 
Advance 



Sept. 11 
Sept. 18 
Sept. 23 



Advance . 



.Friday Sept. 29 

.Thursday.. .Oct. 5 
.Thursday.. .Oct. 12 
.Wednesday. Oct. 18 
..Tuesday... .Oct. 24 



. . P. R. R„ . Monday Oct. 30 



CRISTOBAL TO NEW YORK. 

P. R. R... Sunday 

P. R. R... Sunday 

P. R. R. 

P. R. R. 

P. R. R 

R. R 



Panama 

Cristobal 

Advance 

Colon 

Allianca 

Panama P. 

Advance P. R. R.. 

Colon P. R. R., 

Allianca P. R. R. 

Panama P. R. R. 



Advance 

NEW 

Metapan 

Prinz Joachim 

Zacapa 

Prinz Eitel Friedrich. 

Magdalena 

Almirante 

Prinz Aug. Wilhelm. 

Santa Marta 

Prinz Sigismund 

Clyde 

Metapan 

Prinz Joachim 

Zacapa 

Prinz Eitel Friedrich. 
Atrato 



.Saturday. 
. Saturday. 
. Friday . . . 
.Thursday. 
.Tuesday. . 
. Tuesday. . 
. Monday. , 
Sunday. . 



. .P. R. R. .Saturday. 

YORK TO COLON. 

. .U. F. C. .Thursday.. 

. .H.-A Saturday. , 

. .U. F. C. .Thursday.. 

..H.-A Friday 

. . R. M Saturday. . 

. .U. F. C. .Thursday. 



..H.-A.... 
..U.F.C., 
.H.-A.... 
.R.M.... 
. U- F. C 
.H.A.... 
. U. F. C. 
..H.-A... 
...R.M Saturday. 



.Saturday. 
.Thursday. 
..Friday. . . 
.Saturday. 
.Thursday 
.Saturday. 
.Thursday. 
Friday 



COLON TO NEW YORK. 



Santa Marta 

Prinz Sigismund .... 

Clyde 

Metapan 

Prinz Joachim 

Zacapa 

Prinz Eitel Friedrich. 

Atrato 

Almirante 

Prinz Aug. Wilhelm.. 

Santa Marta 

Prinz Sigismund 

Thames 

Metapan 



. .U. F. C. .Thursday.. 

..H.-A Saturday. 

..R.M Tuesday. . 

. U. F. C. Thursday. 

. .H.-A Tuesday. . 

..U. F. C. .Thursday. 

. .H. A Saturday. 

..R. M Tuesday.. 

. .U. F. C. .Thursday. 



H.-A.... 
.U. F. C. 

.H.-A... 
.R.M... 
..U. F. C. 



Tuesday. , 
Thursday. 
.Saturday. 
.Tuesday. . 
.Thursday. 



.Sept. 17 
.Sept 17 
.Sept. 23 
.Sept. 30 
.Oct. 6 
.Oct. 12 
.Oct. 17 
..Oct. 24 
. . Oct. 30 
.Nov. 5 
.Nov. 11 

.Sept. 7 
.Sept. 9 
.Sept. 14 
.Sept. 15 
.Sept. 16 
..Sept. 21 
..Sept. 23 
.Sept. 28 
. Sept. 29 
. Sept. 30 
.Oct. 5 
.Oct. 7 
. .Oct. 12 
..Oct. 13 
..Oct. 14 

.Sept. 14 
.Sept. 16 
..Sept. 19 
..Sept. 21 
.Sept. 26 
..Sept. 28 
..Sept. 30 
..Oct. 3 
..Oct. 5 
..Oct. 10 
..Oct. 12 
. .Oct. 14 
..Oct. 17 
..Oct. 19 



NEW ORLEANS TO COLON. 



Abangarez. . 
Parismina. . 

Atenas 

Heredia. . . . 
Turrialba. . . 
Abangarez. . 
Parismina. . 

Atenas 

Turrialba. .. 



.U. F. C. 
..U. F. C 
.U. F. C. 
.U. F. C. 
. U. F. C . 
.U. F. C 
.U. F. C. 
.U. F. C. 
-U. F. C. 



.Saturday. . 
.Wednesday 
.Saturday. . 
.Wednesday 
.Saturday. . 
.Saturday. . 
.Wednesday 
..Saturday. . 
.Saturday. . 



.Sept. 9 
.Sept. 13 
.Sept. 16 
.Sept. 20 
.Sept. 23 
.Sept 30 
. Oct. 4 
.Oct. 7 
.Oct. 14 



COLON TO NEW ORLEANS. 

Turrialba U. F. C . .Thursday. . .Sept. 14 

Cartago U. F. C . . .Thursday . . Sept. 14 

Parismina U. F. C. .Thursday. .Sept. 21 

Abangarez U. F. C . .Thursday.. .Sept. 21 

Heiedia U. F. C. .Thursday. ..Sept. 28 

Atenas U. F. C . .Thursday. ..Sept. 28 

Cartago U. F. C. Thursday. ..Oct. 5 

Turrialba U. F. C. .Thursday. .Oct. 5 

Parismina U. F. C. .Thursday. .Oct. 12 

Atenas U. F. C . .Thursday . .Oct. 12 

Hamburg-American steamers leave Colon for New 
York via Kingston at 10 a. m. on sailing dates. The 
Prinz August Wilhelm and Prinz Joachim call at 
Santiago de Cuba, on both outward and homeward 
voyagea. 

Royal Mail steamers leave for New York on alter- 
nate Tuesdays, at 10 a. m.; for Southampton on alter- 
nate Tuesdays at 10 a. m. 

United Fruit Company's ships for New Orleana 
direct leave on Thursdays at 3 p. m.; ships for New 
Orleans in the coastwise serviceon Thursdays at 4 p.m.; 
ships for Npw York via Kingston on Thursdays at 11 
a. m.; for Bocas del Toro on Mondays at 6 p. m. 

The Leyland line steamer Louisianian sails for New 
Orleans direct on or about September 28, 






CANAL 




RECORD 



ANCON, CANAL ZONE, WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 20, 1911. No. 4. 



Volume V. 



The Canal Record 

Published weekly under the authority and supervision of 
the Isthmian Canal Commission. 



The Canal Record is issued free of charge, one copy 
each, to all employes of the Commission and Panama 
Railroad Company whose names are on the gold roll. 
Extra copies and back numbers can be obtained from the 
news stands of the Panama Railroad Company for five 
cents each. 

Address all Communications 

THE CANAL RECORD, 

Ancon, Canal Zone, 

Isthmus of Panama. 

No communication, cither for publication or requesting 
information, will receive attention unless signed with the 
full name and address of the writer. 

NOTES OF PROGRESS. 



A Correction. 
In the issue of The Canal Record of 
September 13, under "Cost of concrete," the 
statement is made that the Atlantic Division 
laid 237.05 cubic yards of material per hour, 
and the Pacific Division 352.67 cubic yards 
per hour. These figures were taken from a 
computation made for the Chairman's forth- 
coming annual report, and a revision shows 
them to have been incorrect. The average 
amount of masonry laid in the locks per 
service hour, during the year, was, by the 
Atlantic Division 260.573 cubic yards of 
concrete and large stone; and by the Pacific 
Division 281.299 cubic yards. 



Chairman's Report. 

The report of the Chairman of the Isthmian 
Canal Commission for the month of August 
is published in full in other columns of this 
issue of The Canal Record. It gives a 
detailed account of the progress of the Canal 
work in all departments and divisions. 



Sale of French Scrap Material. 

The sale has been authorized to the Chicago 
House Wrecking Company, for $215,000, of 
all French equipment and scrap metal in the 
Canal Zone that has not been taken into 
stock for use, or is not already in use. Bids 
were advertised for in the United States, and 
eleven tenders were received, the price 
offered ranging from §40,000 to that of the 
highest bidder, to whom the award was made. 
Six of the bids were for amounts less than 
SI 00,000 ; three for amounts between SI 00,000 
and S200.000, and two for more than $200,000. 
The successful bidder agrees to pay an 
arbitrary rate of eight dollars a ton on the 
issuance of bills of lading until the total price 
is paid. 

Included in the material sold are a number 
of old locomotives, dredges, excavators, dump 
cars, boilers, cranes, cylinders, 30 and 50- 
pound steel rail, scrap iron, copper, and 
brass. Representatives of the various bidders 
visited the Isthmus, and examined the 



material where it lay. It must be taken by 
the contractor from the places where it has 
been collected, or where it was abandoned by 
the French, and transported to the seaboard 
at his expense. A rate of S2.25 per short ton 
will be given by the Panama railroad for 
transportation to either Colon or Balboa. 
Most of the material that was in the Gatun 
Lake region has been removed, but there still 
remain some excavators at Tabernilla and 
some miscellaneous equipment at Bohio, 
which must be removed by the contractor 
before the water covers it, or be a loss. None 
of this material is in the Canal prism. 

A statement of the net value of the French 
scrap sold up to July 1, 1911, is in preparation 
in the office of the Examiner of Accounts, 
and, until that is available, the exact value 
to the Government cannot be given. Approxi- 
mately, one million dollars' worth of the 
material has been applied in Canal construc- 
tion, however, and there have been sold in 
the States as scrap 17,537.23 long tons at an 
average gross price of $11.86 per ton. 

Postal Savings System. 

The President signed an Executive Order 
on September 8 providing for a postal savings 
bank in the Canal Zone. The text of the Order 
will be published in a future issue of The 
Canal Record. 



COST OF EXCAVATION. 



Launching of the "Corozal." 

The ladder dredge Corozal was launched at 
the works of the builders in Renfrew, Scot- 
land, on September 13. After completing a 
working test in material similar to that which 
it must excavate at the Pacific entrance to 
the Canal, the dredge will begin its long 
journey under its own steam, by way of the 
Strait of Magellan, to Balboa. The distance 
is about 11,450 miles, and the voyage will 
take about two months. 



Work in Culebra Cut. 

On September 14, twenty shovels, working 
in the Culebra construction district of the 
Central Division, excavated 33,836 cubic yards 
of rock and earth during the working day of 
eight hours. The shovels were under steam 
160 hours; actually at work 113 hours 20 
minutes; waiting for cars 34 hours 45 minutes; 
other delays, aggregating 11 hours 55 minutes, 
resulted from mining, repairing shovel, 
moving shovel back, derailment, etc. The 
figures given above show that the average 
per shovel for all shovels working in the 
Culebra district on the day in question was 
1,692 cubic yards. 



Culebra Island Water Supply. 

The 10,000-barrel tank now used as a 
water supply for the quarantine station on 
Culebra Island, will be replaced by one of 
24,000 barrels capacity, to be built on rein- 
forced concrete piers. A larger tank is neces- 
sary to supply the quarters on Naos I=land, 
where the men employed on the fortification 
work on Flamenco Island will be housed. 



Statement of Operations for the Fiscal Year, 
1910-1911. 

The total amount of excavation in the 
Atlantic, Central, and Pacific Divisions 
during the fiscal year 1910-11 was 31,804,120 
cubic yards. There were excavated in the 
Atlantic Division 6,738,513 cubic yards, of 
which 881,563 cubic yards consisted of 
material removed in the dry; 5,828,345 cubic 
yards were taken out by dredges working in 
the Atlantic entrance, and 28,605 cubic yards 
excavated hydraulically at Mindi. The dry 
excavation consisted of 475,875 cubic yards 
removed from the site of Gatun Locks; 
125,383 cubic yards from the site of Gatun 
Spillway, and 280,305 cubic yards from the 
cut through the hills at Mindi. 

The total excavation in the Central Divi- 
sion was 18,522,692 cubic yards, of which 
16,221,672 cubic yards were removed from 
the Culebra section, locally known as Culebra 
Cut, and the remainder — 2,301,020 cubic 
yards — from the Chagres River section. 

Excavation in the Pacific Division aggre- 
gated 6,542,915 cubic yards, consisting of 
462,893 cubic yards removed in the dry; 
530,380 cubic yards removed hydraulically, 
and 5,549,642 cubic yards taken out by dredges 
working in the Pacific entrance. The dry 
excavation comprised 264,123 cubic yards 
removed at the Pedro Miguel and Miraflores 
lock sites, and 198,770 cubic yards channel 
excavation. The hydraulic plant removed 
332,703 cubic yards from the lock site at 
Miraflores, and 197,677 cubic yards from 
the channel. 

In addition to the above, there were 
removed in the preparation of foundations 
a total of 399,426 cubic yards, as follows: 
Gatun Locks, 152 582 cubic yards; Gatun 
Spillway, 32,245 cubic yards; Pedro Miguel 
Locks, 76,847 cubic yards; Miraflores Locks, 
137,752 cubic yards. 

The costs for the year, including plant 
charges and division expenses were, as follows: 
Excavation in the dry — Cost per cu. yd. 

Gatun Spillway SO. 4069 

Gatun Locks 0.7110 

Channel, Atlantic Division 0.6010 

Central Division 0.5902 

Pedro Miguel Locks 0.5991 

Channel, Pacific Division 0.6960 

Miraflores Locks 0. 7378 

Hydraulic excavation — 

Mindi 0.2699 

Miraflores Locks 0.5486 

Channel, Pacific Division 0.6106 

Dredging excavation — 

Atlantic Division 0. 2215 

Pacific Division 0. 2519 

Preparation for foundations — 

Gatun Spillway 1 . 5048 

Gatun Locks 1 . 5541) 

Pedro Miguel Locks 2..<740 

Miraflores Locks 1 . 6085 



Repairs to the "Aliianca." 

It is expected that repairs to the AUianca 
will not be completed until October 1, and its 
sailing of September 23 from New York is, 
therefore, cancelled. If the repairs are com- 



26 



THE CANAL RECORD 



Vol. V., No. 4. 



NOTES OF PROGRESS. 



(Continued.) 

pleted the Allianca will leave New York on 
October 5, taking the place of the Advance, 
which will sail on October IS. If the repairs 
are not completed in time for this arrange- 
ment, the Advance will continue on its 
schedule, and the Allianca will sail from New 
York on October 18. 



Pacific Division Sand Service. 

A report of sand cars loaded and shipped 
from Balboa during the month of August, 
1911, follows: 



Destination. 



Number Cubic 
< Cars. Yards. 





2,669 

32 

15 

3 

7 

25 


40 035 




5 8 




361 




70 
175 




405 






Total 


2,751 


41,574 







Hydraulic Excavation Increasing. 

Nearly 150,000 cubic yards of material 
were removed from the lower lock at Mira- 
flores, and from the Canal prism south of it, 
by the Pacific Division hydraulic equipment 
during the month of August, the exact 
amount being 149,926 cubic yards. This is by 
far the largest month's output since the in- 
stallation of the plant, and represents over 
one-fifth of the hydraulic excavation so far 
accomplished in this section up to September 
1, viz., 750,078 cubic yards. The bulk of the 
material was taken from the Canal prism, 
south of the locks, and was comparatively 
free of the gravel which was so prevalent at 
the lower lock site. 

Three dredge pumps were kept in com- 
mission, two in continuous operation, during 
the month, lifting the disintegrated material 
from sumps, after it had been washed loose 
and broken up by streams from the monitors. 
One pump forced material into the core fill 
of the west dam, and 25,000 cubic yards were 
h. nulled in this way. This pump operated at 
one side of the lower lock, and its sump was 
diked in, so as not to interfere with the 
steam shovel operations in progress directly 
opposite. The balance of the material was 
forced upon the flats near the Rio Grande 
diversion, east of the Canal. The land there 
has been raised to elevation +15, and, to 
prevent the mud from flowing into and block- 
ing the Rio Grande, wooden barriers have 
been constructed. A pipe line is being laid 
to extend operations to the low ground further 
south, wherethere is agreater area to be filled. 

The main sump in connection with 
hydraulic operations in the prism, south of 
the locks, will be situated a little north of the 
pumping plant, close to the west bank. This 
sump was excavated, 18 by 22 feet, to eleva- 
tion — 50. Here, the relay pump, originally 
designed to work in connection with the west 
dam fill, lias been set up, thereby relieving 
one of the dredge pumps, which will be sent 
to shop for a general overhauling. Upon being 
excavated, the sump was partly filled with 
selected material — rock screenings and sand, 
as a protection against boulders in the sur- 
rounding material. The relay pump will 
operate from a series of benches on the side 
of the sump, so that as the excavation in- 
creases in depth, the location of the pump 
can be correspondingly changed to suit the 
different levels. The soil jn this part of the 



prism is mixed with a large amount of buried 
tree debris. This is collected into piles, and, 
although sodden, is forced to burn by running 
a compressed air pipe underneath the pile, 
and turning on a jet, which operates as a 
forced draft. 

In the open water channel, which begins a 
short distance south of the site of present 



operations, nothing can be done hydraulically 
until a coffer dam is thrown across it. The 
material for this dam is mostly on the 
ground, and the work of constructing it will be 
started in the next two weeks. The water 
in the lake thus formed will be lowered to 
the point where the monitors and pumps can 
work advantageously. 



CONCRETE WORK IN THE LOCKS. 



Over 65 per cent of the concrete for all the locks is in place, the amount at the close of 
the work on September 16, being 2,732,195 cubic yards, out of a total of approximately 
4,199,400. A total of 31.046J cubic yards of concrete was laid in the locks during the week 
ending September 16. 

GATUN LOCKS. 

About 80 per cent of the concrete for the system of three twin locks at Gatun has been 
laid, the amount in place at the close of work on September 16, being 1,596,370 cubic yards, 
out of a total of 2,000,000. A statement of the amount of concrete placed in the locks each 
working day for the week ending September 16, and of the total, follows; and a similar state- 
ment for the work in the Spillway of Gatun Dam is published elsewhere in this issue. The 
construction plant works 12 hours daily, and the auxiliary plant 9 hours. 



Date. 



Construction Plant. 
2-cubic yard mixers. 



Concrete Hours 
placed. I worked. 



No. of 

mixers 



Auxiliary Plant. 
2-cubic yard mixers 



Concrete 
placed. 



Hours 
worked. 



No. of 
mixers 



Large 
stone. 



Total. 



September 11 

September 12 

September 13 

September 14 

September 15 

September 16 

*Portable mixers . 



Total 

Previously reported . 

Grand total 



Cu. Yds. 
1,808 
1,740 
1,680 
2.096 
1,658 
1,692 



10,674 



30.39 
26.38 
26.46 
33.40 
30.46 
26.04 



174.33 



Yds. 

202 

252 

440 

210 

332 

310 

4175 



40 
40 I 
40 
40 
40 ! 
40 I 



Cu. 



2,163} 43.00 



- 



Yds. 

72 

86 

84 
136 
11J 

78 



Cm, 



Yds. 
2,082 
2,078 
2,204 
2,442 
2,102 
2.080 

4175 



13,405 ', 
1.582.964"} 



1,596,370 



*The 417} yards shown for the portable mixers are reinforced concrete, and were placed on the following days: 
September 11th. 55; September 12th, 76}; September 13th, 78}; September 14th, 7S; September 15th. 69; Sep- 
tember 16th, 60}. 

PEDRO MIGUEL LOCKS. 

Concrete work in the locks at Pedro Miguel is over 86 per cent completed, 722,989 cubic 
yards, out of a total of 837,400, bucket measurement, having been placed at the close of work 
on September 16. The record for each of the six 8-hour working days of last week, follows: 





Auxiliary Plant. 


Large 
stone. 




Date. 


2-cubic yard mixers. 


}-cubic yard mixer. 


Total. 




Concrete 
placed. 


Hours No. of [Concrete 
worked, mixers, placed. 


Hours 
worked. 


No. of 
mixers 






Cu. Yds. 
490 
450 
532 
530 
508 
634 


14.00 
14.00 
16.00 
14.00 
13.50 
18.00 


Cu. Yds. 
3 175 


9.33 

4.50 
9.83 
1.75 


3 

1 
3 

1 


Cu. Yds. 


Cu. Yds. 
665 




3 
3 
3 
3 
3 


81 
160 
36 


531 




692 




566 




508 


September 16 










634 












Total 


3,144 


89 50 


3 


452 


25.41 


1.33 


3,596 






4,411 


719,393 




















| 








4,411 


722,989 





















MIRAFLORES LOCKS. 

Over 30 per cent of the concrete for the system of two twin locks at Miraflores was in 
place on September 16, the total amount on that date being 412,836 cubic yards, bucket 
measurement, out of a total of approximately 1,362,000. The record for each of the six 8-hour 
working days of last week, follows: 



Date. 



Construction Plant. 
2-cubic yard mixers. 



Auxiliary Plant. 



2-cubic yard mixers. 



}-cubic yard mixer. 



placed. 



Concrete Hours !No. of Concrete Hours No. of Concrete Hours No. of Large 



worked. I mixers! placed. , worked, mixers placed. I worked, i mixers 



stone. 



Total. 



Sept. 11. . 
Sept. 12. . 
Sept. 13.. 
Sept. 14. , 
Sept. 15.. 
Sept. 16. . 


Cu. Yds. 
836 
622 
1.080 
1,362 
1.108 
1.014 


19.00 
16.50 
30.33 
32.33 
26.17 
27.00 


5 
4 
6 
6 
6 
5 


Cu. Yds. 
148 
116 
103 
116 
135 
205 


13.50 
11.00 
8.00 
16.50 
10.25 
16.75 


3 
2 

1 
2 
2 
3 


Cu. Yds. 
1,254 
1.108 
1,230 
1,322 
1,204 
1,082 


15.93 
16.33 
15.90 
16.50 
15.00 
13.41 


2 
2 
2 
2 
2 
2 


Cu. Yds. 


Cu. Yds. 
2,238 
1.846 
2,413 
2,800 
2,447 
2,301 


Total . . 
Previously 


6,022 


151.33 


5 3 


823 


76 00 


2.01 


7,200 


93.07 


2 


3,693 


14,045 
398,791 
























Grand 


3,693 


412,836 





















September 20, 1911. 



THE CANAL RECORD 



27 



RECRUITING. LABORERS. 

Upward of 1,300 Brought to Isthmus Within 
Past Three Months. 

Nearly 1,000 contract laborers have been 
recruited in the Antilles during the past 
three months for work on the Canal. Most 
of these came from the islands in the neigh- 
borhood of Barbados, but only a few of them 
were Barbadians, because the island govern- 
ment has prohibited further recruiting there. 
The headquarters of the Commission's 
recruiting agent, however, has been main- 
tained at Bridgetown, the capital of Barba- 
dos, and most of the laborers took ship from 
that port. It was intended to recruit a full 
1,000 men, but the contingent that arrived 
on the Isthmus on September 3 will probably 
be the last, as the total is but a few short 
of the desired number, and the labor supply- 
is no longer short. During the month of J uly, 
195 men were brought to the Isthmus in 
two lots, consisting of 49 and 146 men, re- 
spectively; in August, 507 in two lots of 271 
and 236, respectively, and, on September 3, 
there arrived another lot of 239 men, making 
a grand total of 941. 

In addition to the above, 249 laborers 
have recently been recruited from Fortune, 
Turk's, and other islands in the Bahama 
group for work on the Panama railroad relo- 
cation, and at other points. The Panama 
railroad steamship Advance brought 43 at 
one time, and 56 at another; the Prinz 
Sigismund of the Hamburg-American line, 
had 70 on board on its last trip, and the 
Cristobal landed 80 on September 6. These 
men were recruited under an arrangement 
with a man named Mora, who is known 
throughout the Bahamas as the "King of 
Fortune Island." He furnishes the men at 
a stated price per head, and sends his sloops 
among the neighboring islands to pick them 
up. The recruits are unusually robust, make 
excellent workmen, and those selected for 
the Canal work are nearly all young men, 
or men in their prime. The majority are 
direct descendants from their African fore- 
bears, and, therefore, differ from a great 
many of the inhabitants of the West Indies, 
inasmuch as they are more than usually free 
from mixed blood. 

A few Peruvians, numbering 27 in all to 
date, have been added to the Canal force. 
They come under no contract with the Com- 
mission, and pay their own way, but are 
given work as soon as they report. 



Civil Service Examinations. 

Examinations will be held, probably on 
October 22, for the following positions. Agri- 
cultural inspector, Philippine service; assist- 
ant observer, Weather Bureau service; civil 
engineer, Departmental and Philippine serv- 
ices; civil engineer and draftsman, depart- 
mental service; cadet engineer and cadet 
officer, Lighthouse service; electrotyper- 
finisher, electrotyper-molder, and stereo- 
typer, Government Printing Office; mechan- 
ical draftsman and topographic draftsman, 
Isthmian Canal service; engineer, Indian 
service; pharmacist, Public Health anrl 
Marine Hospital service; printer, Govern- 
ment Printing Office; surveyor, Philippine 
service; trained nurse, Isthmian Canal, 
Indian, and Philippine services; wireman, 
departmental service. 

Women will be admitted only to examina- 
tion for the position of trained nurse. 

Applications will not be received after 



September 29 for the above examinations. 
The kind of examination desired should be 
stated in requesting information in regard 
to any of the above. 

In answer to the question in application 
forms as to bona fide residence, applicants 
are required to show residence up to the date 
of application. It is to be noted that bona 
fide residence does not require continuous 
bodily presence, but refers to the place at 
which an applicant, if a voter, is legally 
entitled to vote. 

John K. Baxter, Secretary, 
Isthmian Civil Service Board. 

Culebra, C. Z., September 14, 1911. 



Boy Scouts. 

Seventy-five boy scouts, accompanied by 
four leaders and five scout masters, made an 
excursion to Old Panama on Labor Day. 
Two special cars attached to the southbound 
morning train brought the boys from Colon 
and the intermediate stations. The "hike" 
out, about eight miles, was made in two hours 
and a half and the day was spent on the beach 
in scout games and practice. Dinner was 
cooked by the boys. The boy scouts have 
been organized on the Isthmus one year. They 
are divided into patrols of eight, and 
two or more patrols form a troop. Each 
patrol has a scout leader elected from its 
number, and each troop has a scout master, 
who is elected by the managing council, called 
the Isthmian Scout Council. The organization 
is affiliated with the National Boy Scouts of 
America. 

Up to the present time, the local troops 
have made their "hikes" into the nearby 
country, accompanied by their leaders and 
masters, but, at a recent meeting of the 
council, it was decided to hold one general 
outing a month, when all the troops would 
meet at some central place, proceeding 
thence to the point decided upon. 

The majority of the Zone scouts have 
passed through the "tenderfoot" class, and are 
second-class scouts. Any boy scout leaving 
the Isthmus will be passed into any troop in 
the States in the class in which he stands on 
leaving. 

Hebrew Benevolent Society — New Year 5672. 

Services will be conducted at the Sojourn- 
ers' lodge room, Colon, on Friday evening, 
September 22, at 6.30 o'clock, and on Satur- 
day morning, September 23, beginning at 
S.30 o'clock. All Jewish residents of the 
Canal Zone are cordially invited. 



Death of James J. Riley. 

James J. Riley, aged 29 years, a sailor on 
the Newport Neivs, born in Boston, Mass., 
was struck by a switch engine in the railroad 
yard at Colon on the morning of August 31, 
and killed. Information is desired with regard 
to his home or relatives, in order that they 
may be informed of his death. 

Ancon Rifle Club. 

As a result of a meeting held on Sep- 
tember 17, the organization of the Ancon 
Rifle Club was completed, and it was decided 
to make application for a charter, and to 
affiliate with the National Rifle Association 
of America. Further information may be 
obtained by addressing the secretary, Wm. 
J. Ergcnzinger, Ancon. 

August Weather. 

The general deficiency in rainfall in the 
Canal Zone continued during the month of 



August. The average temperatures for the 
month, at all stations, were the highest of 
record, while the mean atmospheric pressure 
at each of the stations was the lowest of 
record. 

PERSONAL. 



Lieutenant-Colonel C. A. Devol, accom- 
panied by his wife and daughter, sailed on 
the Panama on September 17, on his annual 
leave of absence. 

Mr. S. B. Williamson, accompanied by his 
daughter, sailed on the Panama for New York 
on September 17, on annual leave. 

Mr. Edward J. Williams left the Isthmus 
on his annual vacation leave on September 16. 

Mr. J. A. Smith will arrive on the Colon 
on September 24 from his annual vacation 
in the States. 

Mr. C. M. Saville. accompanied by his 
wife and son, left on the Cristobal on Septem- 
ber 17, for his annual leave in the States. 

Among the passengers on the Advance, 
which arrived at Cristobal on September 17, 
were Mr. T. C. Clear and wife; Major JohnC. 
Oakes, Corps of Engineers; and Captain 
L. D. Cabell of the Quartermaster's Depart- 
ment, U. S. A. 



Pilots, Mates, Masters, Chauffeurs. 

Examinations for pilots, mates, and mas- 
ters; and for chauffeurs, will be held by the 
Board of Local Inspectors at Ancon, C. Z., 
on September 27. All applicants for exami- 
nation should be present at 8 a. m. 

Gorgona Catholic Club. 

The Gorgona Catholic Club held a banquet 
at the I. C. C. hotel on Saturday evening, 
September 16, in honor of the Rev. Father 
Rojas, pastor of the Gorgona Catholic Church. 
The club was organized in May, 1911, and 
now has 60 members. 



Gatun Dam Spillway. 

The concrete work in the Spillway of Gatun 
Dam is over 69 per cent completed, 155,522 
cubic yards, out of a total of 225,000, having 
been placed at the close of work on Septem- 
ber 16. A statement of the amount laid each 
working day last week, and of the total in 
place, follows: 



Date. 


Concrete 
Laid. 


Hours 
worked. 


No. 
Mixers. 




152 
140 
160 
156 
168 
176 


7.00 
7.00 
10.30 
10.30 
8.00 
8.00 


1 




1 




2 




2 

1 




2 








952 
154.570 


51.00 


1.50 


Previously reported . . . 






155,522 





Porto Bello Crusher. 

A statement of the work done at the Porto 
Bello crusher, by days, for the week ending 
September 16, follows: 



Date. 



Cubic 
Yards. 



September 11 . 
September 12 . 
September 13 . 
September 14 . 
September 15 . 
September 16 . 



Total 




>J.47i 



Sailing of the "Ancon." 

The steamship Ancon will sail from dock 
No. 11, Cristobal, for New York on Thursday, 
September 28, at 3 p. m. 



28 



THE CANAL RECORD 



Vol. V., No. 4. 



CANAL WORK IN AUGUST. 

Monthly Report of the Chairman and Chief 
Engineer to the Secretary of War. 

Culebra, C. Z., September 15, 1911. 
The Honorable Ihe Secretary of War. 
Washington, D. C. 

Sir: I have the honor to submit the fol- 
lowing report of operations on the Isthmus 
for the month of August, 1911. 
Department of Construction and Engineering. 

The following table summarizes the prin- 
cipal items of construction work accomplished 
by the Atlantic, Central, and Pacific Divi- 
sions during the month: 



top panel, has been riveted in place. On these 
two leaves, about 75 per cent of the sheathing 
plates have been fitted and erected, and 16 
per cent of the riveting done. The correspond- 
ing leaves in the twin lock have been erected 
to the height of seven panels, and sheathed 
up to the sixth panel. Riveting has just 
commenced on these leaves. 

Erection work has been started at Pedro 
Miguel on the four 54-foot 8-inch leaves of 
the upper guard gates, the bottom girders for 
three leaves having been placed in the lock 
chambers. The fourth leaf of this size gate 
has been erected seven panels high, with the 



Item. 


Unit. 


Atlantic. 


Central. 


Pacific. 


Total. 




Cubic yards 


87 599 
367.456 


1,454,322 
9,972 


156,633 
630,241 


1,698 554 

1,007.669 








455.055 


1.464,294 


786.S74 
























































Cubic yards... . 

Tous (Gross)... 
Feet 


491,815 
71.978 

76 88 

54,565 




122,015 
77,739 

34.65 

104510 


615,830 
149,717 

359.90 

576,784 








24S.37 

417,709 
12.87 
1S.00 












2.12 

41.826 
74.12S 
0.56 

4.396 

716 

64.318 

7.303 

9.75 


5.87 

58.962 
80,324 


25.99 

100,788 
154.802 
0.56 

10.282 

1.035 

S3.311 

20,351 

7.79 








350 








Feet 


973 

104 

591 

S.163 

7.50 


4.913 

215 

18,402 

4.8S5 

6.96 






Feet 















First Division, Office of the Chief Engineer. 
MASONRY AND LOCK STRUCTURES. 

As stated in the report for the month of 
July, the material under contract for work 
designed in this subdivision is being inspected 
by the force of the General Purchasing Officer 
in the United States, and the erection work 
is being done by the division engineers. The 
field work consisted of valve tests at Gatun, 
experiments of flow of water through different 
sized orifices, and the inspection of buffer 
castings under fabrication at the Gorgona 
shops. 

Lock Gates and Protective Devices — Up to 
August 20, a total of 31,738 tons of material 
had been accepted at the mills, 2,482 tons 
having been fabricated in the shops during 
the month. Up to August 20, a total of 
12,759 tons of this material had been shipped 
to the Isthmus. 

The first eight leaves for Gatun and Pedro 
Miguel upper guard gates, 54 feet 8 inches 
high, have been completed in the shop and 
shipped. Eight of the 77-foot leaves for the 
upper and middle gates of upper Gatun Lock 
are within three per cent of completion, and 
over fifty per cent of this material has been 
shipped to the Isthmus. Of the upper and 
middle gates at Pedro Miguel, 79 feet high, 
45 per cent of the shop work has been com- 
pleted, although but 40 per cent has so far 
been accepted, and a very small percentage 
shipped to the Isthmus. 

At Gatun, one leaf of the upper guard gate 
of the upper lock has been erected to its full 
height, and about 90 per cent of the sheathing 
plates have been fitted in place, and 20 per 
cent of the riveting done. The other leaf in 
the same lock has been erected to its full 
height, with the exception of the top girder. 
All interior framing, with the exception of the 



interior framing fitted in place, but not riveted. 

Satisfactory progress has been made in the 
erection and adjustment, as well as in the 
babbitting, of the nickel steel bearing plates 
in the hollow quoins at both Gatun and Pedro 
Miguel. 

Inspection of Operating Machinery and 
Electrical Equipment — The inspection force 
under this subdivision reporting directly to 
this office has cared for the technical matters 
relating to inspection, as follows: 

(1) For the Stoney gate and cylindrical 
valve machines to be tested at the works of 
the manufacturer, purchased under Circular 
614 — Less rapid progress was made than 
during the preceding month, the delay having 
been occasioned by tardy delivery of material 
on suborders. The last of the motors, which 
are to be subjected to competitive test under 
this circular, were shipped from the factory 
during the month. Foundation bolts and 
washers for the above have arrived on the 
Isthmus, and have been inspected, and it is 
anticipated that installation will begin during 
the month of September. 

(2) For the rack railway and other material 
purchased under Circular 619 — The man- 
ufacture of this material has progressed satis- 
factorily, with the exception of the rack 
section, trouble being experienced by the 
manufacturer in casting the same. To date, 
no award has been made on classes 4, 5, and 
6 of this circular. 

(3) For the gate operating machines, class 
1, and miter forcing machines, class 2, pur- 
chased under Circular 627 — Inspection of 
the sample machines of the first class is just 
commencing; progress on the sample machines 
of the second class is making rapid advance- 



ment, and will likely be completed during the 
month of September. 

(4) For the gate and girder hoisting 
machinery for the emergency dams — The 
organization is being planned to include this 
inspection as the need shall arise. The draw- 
ings required to be submitted by the con- 
tractor are nearing completion, and will be 
submitted for approval in the near future. 

Emergency Dams — The work under this 
subdivision in the United States has consisted 
principally in the checking of shop drawings 
made by the contractor, a total of 137 draw- 
ings having been approved up to August 23. 
Of the construction work in connection with 
the emergency dams, 43 patterns of the 
various castings were completed, and patterns 
for 27 additional castings were in course of 
preparation. 

AIDS TO NAVIGATION. 

During the month, 133 acres of land were 
cleared in the vicinity of Frijoles and Mamei 
for sights for beacons and reference buoys; 
40,050 linear feet of trochas were cut, and the 
necessary land for making surveys cleared and 
profile taken. Twelve gas buoys were located 
and referenced between Bohio and Caimito; 
three beacons were located and referenced 
between San Pablo and Caimito; and two 
lights were located at Balboa. 
Atlantic Division. 
GATUN LOCKS. 

Excavation — Crane excavation in the lower 
lock, and shovel excavation for obtaining clay 
for back fill, were continued. A total of 594 
cubic yards of material was removed by crane 
and hand, and 20,100 cubic yards by shovel. 
On August 31, the total excavation amounted 
to 5,909,939 cubic yards, of which 5,036,519 
cubic yards were removed from the prism. The 
excavation in the locks was 99.78 per cent 
completed. 

Backfill — Back filling behind the side walls 
of the upper, middle, and lower locks, and in 
the center wall of the upper lock, was con- 
tinued. The quantity placed during August 
aggregated 78,850 cubic yards, increasing the 
total to 685,467 cubic yards. On August 31, 
the back filling was 42.25 per cent completed 

Receiving and Issuing Material — The con- 
sumption of rock, sand, and cement during 
the month exceeded the receipts by the fol- 
lowing respective amounts: 18,392 cubic 
yards, 3,110 cubic yards, and 19,888 barrels. 

Mixing and Placing Plants — Both plants, 
and all portable mixers, were kept in satis- 
factory operation during the month. 

Power Plant and Pumps — The operation 
of the power plant and pumps was satisfac- 
tory. 

Iron and Steel Work — During the month, 
343.3 tons of fixed steel, 82 tons of reinforcing 
rails, and 35,462 feet of reinforcing rods were 
placed, and 300 linear feet of electrical track 
were laid. 

Concrete Work — There was a decrease of 
4,1 1 7 J cubic yards in the amount of concrete 
laid, as compared with the figures for the 
preceding month. The daily average for the 
27 working days was 2,478 cubic yards, as 
compared with a daily average during July 
of 2,842 cubic yards. The total amount of 
concrete placed during the month was 66,928 
cubic yards, including 4,416 cubic yards of 
large stone. The bucket measurement ex- 
ceeded the place measurement by 374 cubic 
yards. Of the total concrete. 4,562 cubic 
yards were placed in the upper lock, 17,608 



September 20, 1911. 



THE CANAL RECORD 



29 



cubic yards in the middle lock, and 44,758 
cubic yards in the lower lock. The concrete 
work for the entire lock system was 78.13 
per cent completed at the end of August. 

OPERATION OF THE PERMANENT AND AUXILIARY CON- 
CRETE CONSTRUCTION PLANTS. 



Permanent Auxiliary 
Plant. Plant 



Length of working day (hours). 

Average number of hours per 
day worked, per strand of 
cableway laying concrete and 
large stone (actual working 
time) 

Average number of mixers per 
day j 

Average hourly output per mixer 
(actual working time) cu. yds. 

Average amount of concrete and 
large stone laid per hour, per 
strand of cableway (actual 
working time) cu. yds j 

Large stone laid, cu. yds 

Concrete laid, cableways.cu.yds. 

Concrete laid, through chute in- 
to dump cars, cu. yds 

Concrete laid, derricks, cu. yds . 

Concrete laid, dump cars, cu. yds 

Concrete laid, portable mixers. . 



Total amount of concrete and 
large stone laid , cu. yds. ...... 



8.50 



11.29 



6.06 
7.00 



59.47 | 61.81 



31.35 

3,456 

37,902 



960 



9,430 



4.376 
9,088 
2,090 



50,788 



16,514 



GATUN DAM. 

Construction during the month increased 
the total fill, as determined by cross sections 
of the material in place, by 491,815 cubic 
yards, making the total amount in place 
15,311 792 cubic yards. 

Hydraulic Fill — The dredges increased the 
hydraulic fill by 259,389 cubic yards. The 
total hydraulic fill in place August 31 was 
7,996,328 cubic yards. 

Dry Fill — Material received from the Cen- 
tral Division and steam shovel No. 134, 
amounting to 232,426 cubic yards, was placed 
on the north and south toes of the Dam, east 
and west of the Spillway, making the total 
dry fill in place 7,315,464 cubic yards. 

GATUN SPILLWAY. 

Excavation — In preparing foundations of 
the Spillway dam, 742 cubic yards of rock 
were removed by hand. On August 31, the 
total Spillway excavation amounted to 
1,585,608 cubic yards 

Concrete — The work of placing concrete 
was continued, the amount placed during the 
month aggregating 5,050 cubic yards, which 
increased the total to 155,731 cubic yards. 
The concrete work for the Spillway was 68.8 
per cent completed. 

Hydroelectric Plant — On August 15, exca- 
vation was commenced on the site of the 
power house, and continued to the close of 
the month. 20,625 cubic yards of earth being 
removed. 

HARBOR AND CHANNEL SECTION. 

Excavation Below Sea Level at Mindi — 
During the month, two steam shovels removed 
20,728 cubic yards of earth and 44,313 cubic 
yards of rock from the Canal prism. 

Dredging from the Ocean to Mindi — Five 
dredges removed 324,156 cubic yards of earth 
and 43,300 cubic yards of rock from the Canal 
prism. In addition, dredge No. 86 placed 
4,989 cubic yards of material in the Colon 
fill, which was completed on August 4. On 
August 31, forty feet of water could be carried 
from zero to zero plus 2,000 feet; 35 feet to 
mile 3 plus 3,600 feet; 30 feet to mile 4 plus 
650 feet; 20 feet to mile 5 plus 2,438.9 feet, 
at the junction with the French canal. 

WEST BREAKWATER, COLON. 

Forty-eight thousand four hundred and 
twenty-one cubic yards of rock were excava- 
ted, of which amount 44,958 cubic yards were 



placed in the breakwater, and 3,463 cubic 
yards in track fill. The double track trestle 
was extended 647 linear feet. On August 31, 
the trestle extended 6,619 feet from shore. The 
total amount of rock dredged and dumped on 
the west breakwater to August 1, 1911, was 
643,877 cubic yards. During the month, 
43,300 cubic yards were dredged and dumped, 
increasing the total to 687,177 cubic yards. 
The amount of dry fill placed to September 1 
was 454,490 cubic yards. 

PORTO BELLO. 
PERFORMANCE OF ROCK CRUSHER PLANT. 

Lengtii of working days — hours 8.00 

Average number of hours worked per day. . 3.98 

Average number of cubic yards per hour of 

working day 193.60 

Average number of cubic yards per working 

hour 389.30 

Maximum day's output. (5 hours 23 minutes) 

cu. yds 2,176.00 

Average day's output (27 days) cu. yds 1,5-19.00 

Average hourly output, (209 hours 10 min- 
utes) cu. yds 200.00 

Total output for the month, cu. yds 41.826.00 

SAND, STONE, AND CEMENT SERVICE. 

In connection with this service, plant 
steamed 6,250 miles, handled 625 barges, and 
carried 2,240 passengers. 

NOMBRE DE DIOS. 

During the month, 55 barges, containing 
27,788 cubic yards of sand, were shipped to 
Gatun. 

MUNICIPAL ENGINEERING. 

The reservoirs, water mains, sewers, roads, 
and oil pipe lines were maintained and ex- 
tended, as required to facilitate construction 

work. 

Central Division. 

During the month of August, the total 
amount of material excavated in the Central 
Division was 1,464,294 cubic yards, of which 
191,485 cubic yards were classified as earth 
and 1,272,809 cubic yards as rock. Of this 
quantity, 1,442,402 cubic yards were removed 
by steam shovels, and contractors removed 
9,972 cubic yards by sluicing; and 11,920 
cubic yards by hand. The total — 1,464,294 
cubic yards — consisted of primary excavation 
for the Canal prism. 

The daily average number of steam shovels 
at work during the month was 40.66, and the 
total number of shovel clays was 1,098, as 
compared with 40.70 shovels at work during 
the month of July, with 1,017s shovel days. 

For comparison with the work done by 
steam shovels during the corresponding 
month of the previous year, the following 
table has been prepared: 



Period 


Excava- 
ted by 
shovels. 


Classification of 
material. 


en 

6 ^ * 
o 


■i, 

> 

V 

J. 

11 

7 


J£ > 

V o ,- 




Rock. 


Earth 




1910- 
Aug... . 

mil: 
Aug... . 


< «. yds 

1 602 738 
1,4)2.40! 


Cu. Yds. 
1,174.446 

1,269,309 


Cu. Yds 

428,292 

173.093 


44 63 

40.6 ; 


C. V. 

1,330.10 

1,31.1.66 



Rainfall at Empire: 1910. 10 08 ins.: 1911, 5.9S ins. 

The above table shows the average output 
per shovel to have been 0.12 per cent greater 
in August, 1910, than in the corresponding 
month of the present year. 

The total amount of material excavated 
from the prism in the Culebra section of the 
Central Division in August, 1911—1,442,402 
cubic yards — was the highest record in that 
section for the month of August, the previous 
high record for the month having been in 
August, 1910, when 1,377,714 cubic yards 
were removed. 

The total estimated amount of material to 
be removed in the Central Division, according 



to the revised estimate of July 1, 1911, was 
101,801,296 cubic yards, and up to September 
1, 1911, 80,162,646 cubic yards had been 
removed, leaving 21,63S,650 cubic yards to 
be removed in order to complete all excava- 
tion in the Central Division. From these 
figures, it will be seen that 78.74 per cent of 
all excavation in the Central Division had 
been completed up to the close of the month 
of August, and 21.26 per cent remained 
uncompleted. 

Considering the two sections which com- 
pose the Central Division, the excavation 
completed, and that to be completed, at the 
close of August operations was, as follows: 

CULEBRA SECTION. Cu. Yds. 

Completed 68,295.100 

To be completed 21,148.905 

CHAGRES SECTION. Cu. Yds. 

Completed 11.867.546 

To be completed 489,745 

From the above figures, it will be seen that 
the Culebra section, locally known as the 
"Culebra Cut," was 76.35 per cent completed, 
with 23.65 per cent to be completed; the 
Chagres section was 96.04 per cent completed, 
with 3.96 per cent to be completed. 

During the month, 37,708 cubic yards of 
material were hauled from the Canal prism 
and dumped in the embankment for the road- 
bed of the relocated Panama railroad. The 
total amount of spoil from the Central Divi- 
sion used for this purpose at the close of the 
month, was 3,92 1,3 11 cubic yards. The Central 
Division also delivered at Gatun 235,231 
cubic yards of rock and earth for use in the 
construction of the Dam, making the total 
for this purpose at the end of August, 4.22S.- 
067 cubic yards. 

The daily average number of laborers at 
work on the whole division during the month 
was 7,366, and the daily average number of 
gold employes was 797. 

Pacific Division. 
DISTRICT NO. 1 — LOCKS AND DAMS. 

Excavation — The total excavation during 
the month amounted to 156,633 cubic yards. 

Filling and Embankment — During August, 
24,812 cubic yards of dry filling were added 
to the prism of the west dam at Pedro 
Miguel, increasing the total amount of 
material in place at the close of the month to 
300,529 cubic yards. The back fill at Pedro 
Miguel was increased by 22,088 cubic yards, 
the total in place at the end of the month 
amounting to 320,118 cubic yards. 

At Miraflores, 72,203 cubic yards were 
added to the dry fill in the toes, and 25,000 
cubic yards to the hydraulic fill in the core 
of the west dam, making the totals at the 
end of the month 943,117 cubic yards, and 
632,689 cubic yards, respectively. The back 
fill was increased by 6,117 cubic yards, the 
total aggregating 181,058 cubic yards at the 
end of the month. 

Pedro Miguel Locks — The general back 
filling behind the west wall was continued, as 
was also the filling in of the middle wall. The 
McClintic-Marshall Construction Company 
commenced erection of the upper lock gates 
on August 7. 

Concrete Work — The total amount of con- 
crete and large stone laid at Pedro Miguel 
was 20,736 cubic yards, as compared with 
19,906 cubic yards during July. The concrete 
was placed, as follows: Six thousand five 
hundred and seven cubic yards in the east 
wall; 6,593 cubic yards in the west wall; 
6,484 cubic yards in the center wall; 202 cubic 



30 



THE CANAL RECORD 



Vol. V., No. 4. 



yards in the floors; and 950 cubic yards in 
the southwest wing wall. 

OPERATION OF THE PERMANENT AND AUXILIARY CON- 
CRETE CONSTRUCTION PLANTS AT PEDRO MIGUEL. 



Length of working day (hours). 

Average number of hours per 
day, worked laying concrete 
and large stone (actual work- 
ing time) 

Average number of mixers per 
day 

Average hourly output per 
mixer (actual working time).. 

Average amount of concrete and 
large stone laid per hour, per 
chamber crane (actual working 
time) 



Permanent 
Plant. 



Auxiliary 
Plant. 



.00 



Cu. Yds. 



Large stone laid. 
Concrete laid . . . 



Total concrete laid 4.650. 00 



41.92 



4.650.00 



8.00 



5.17 

5.15 

Cu. Yds. 

28.13 



16,086.00 



16,086.00 



Permanent plant consisted of two chamber cranes, 
placing. No mixers. 

Auxiliary plant consisted of three 2-cubic yard mix- 
ers, and a daily average of 2.19 ^-cubic yard mixers, A 
daily average of 2.07 $-cubic yard mixers discharged 
directly into forms, balance of concrete placed by 
chamber cranes, and with locomotive cranes and der- 
ricks, averaging 3.07 units daily. 

Miraflores Locks — The McClintic-Marshall 
Construction Company commenced the erec- 
tion of berm crane "E" on the east bermof the 
locks. Chamber crane No. 4 was placed in 
operation August 2 laying concrete in the 
middle wall. Dry excavation in the lower lock 
was continued, and steam shovel excavation 
for the solid portion of the upper guide wall 
was completed. Filling was continued in the 
east and west toes of the west dam. During 
the month, the amount of iron placed aggre- 
gated 306,073 pounds. 

Concrete Work — The total amount of con- 
crete and large stone laid was 57,003 cubic 
yards, as compared with 32,840 cubic yards 
during July. The concrete was placed, as 
follows: Five thousand two hundred and 
thirty-nine cubic yards in the east wall; 
25,498 cubic yards in the west wall; 23,730 
cubic yards in the center wall; and 2,536 
cubic yards in the floors. 

OPERATION OF THE PERMANENT AND AUXILIARY CON- 
CRETE CONSTRUCTION PLANTS AT MIRAFLORES. 



Permanent 
Plant. 



Length of working day (hours) . , 
Average number of hours per 
day worked laying concrete 
and large stone (actual work- 
ing time) 

Average number of mixers per 
day 



Auxiliary 
Plant. 



Average hourly output per mixer 
(actual working time) 

Average amount of concrete and 
large stone laid per hour, per 
berm, or chamber crane (actu- 
al working time) 



Large stone laid . 
Concrete laid . . . 



Cu. 



6.55 



5.22 
Yds. 



Total concrete laid 53,285.00 \ 3,718.00 



60.28 



Cu 



3.74 
Yds. 



38.06 



53,285.00 3,718.00 



Auxiliary plant consisted of a daily average of 1.81 
J-cubic yard mixers, discharging directly into forms, 
and a daily average of 1.93 2-cubic yard mixers, the 
output of which was placed by chamber cranes. 

DISTRICT NO. 3 — MUNICIPAL AND SANITARY 

ENGINEERING. 

The reservoirs, water mains, sewers, roads, 
and oil pipe lines were maintained and ex- 
tended, as required to facilitate construction 
work. 

DISTRICT NO. 4 ANCON QUARRY. 

PERFORMANCE OF ROCK CRUSHER PLANT. 

Hours. 

Length of working day (hours) 8.00 

Average number of hours per day (actual 

working time) 6.26 

Average number of cubic yards crushed per 

hour of working day 272.97 



Average number of cubic yards crushed per 

working hour 348.84 

Total output for the month, cubic yards. . . . 58,962.00 

DISTRICT NO. 2 — DREDGING. 

The following is a statement of the five 
dredges which were in operation during the 
month, and of the amount of material exca- 
vated hydraulically. 



of the regiment of infantry, which is expected 
during the latter part of September. 

MATERIAL AND SUPPLIES 

The value of material received from the 
United States during the month was $539,- 
840.08, as compared with $909,323.75 during 
August, 1910. Supplies during the month 





Type. 


Work. 


Plant. 


Total. 






Earth. 


Rock. 


Earth. 


Rock. 


Remarks. 




Dipper 

Ladder... . 
Ladder.. . . 
Ladder.. . . 
Suction 


Cu. yds. 

33,029 

111.40S 

101,426 

9.025 

212.002 


Cu. Yds. 

9,400 


Cu. Yds. 
7,025 


Cu. Yds. 


Cu. Yds. 

49.454 
111,4118 
101.4J6 

13,050 
213,261 






















4.025 










1,259 














Total 


466.890 
♦149,926 


13.425 


S.2S4 




488.599 
149,926 

63S5J5 






















Gran<1 Total 


616.816 


13.425 


8 284 

















*Excavated from Canal prism, south of Miraflores lock site. 



CHAME SAND EXCAVATION. 

Approximately 41,700 cubic yards of sand 
were excavated at PuntaChame, and delivered 
at Balboa. 

Relocation of Panama Railroad. 

During the month, 371,076 cubic yards of 
material were excavated, increasing the total 
excavation at the close of the month 
to 8,225.018 cubic yards; and 396,766 cubic 
yards of material were placed in embank- 
ment, increasing the total for this purpose 
to 13,972,202 cubic yards. 

The average daily number of steam shovels 
at work was 9.41, and the total number of 
working days was 27. 

For comparison with the work done by 
steam shovels during the preceding month, 
and during the corresponding month of the 
previous year, the following table has been 
prepared ; 



Period 



Excava- 
ted by 
shovels. 



1910: 
Aug... . 

1911: 
July... 
Aug... 



Cu. Yds. 

250,341 



338.760 
359.363 



Classification of 
material. 



o u* 



Cu.Yds. 

86,310 



251,930 
242,331 



Earth. 



1 > « " 



Cu. Yds. 

161,031 ! 7.04 



S6.830 8.72 
117,032 9.41 



£■§.§ 



:| < a 



C. Y. 

1,318 



1.554 
1.415 



During the month, 954 feet of temporary 
trestle were driven, and work on bridges and 
culverts was continued. No permanent 
track was laid during the month, the amount 
of 70-pound and 90-pound track remaining 
at 134,698 linear feet, and 42,043 linear feet, 
respectively, as previously reported. The 
force averaged 2,285 men, in addition to 
those employed by contractors. 

Quartermaster's Department. 
LABOR. 

Five hundred and seven laborers were 
received from Barbados during the month. 

QUARTERS. 

There was an increase of 700 West Indians 
occupying Commission quarters during the 
month. On account of the approaching 
abandonment of the Tabernilla-San Pablo 
district, no more assignments of married 
quarters will be made in that district. 

BUILDINGS. 

Three gangs of carpenters, and one gang of 
painters, were employed at Las Cascadas 
making the necessary repairs, alterations, 
and moving buildings for the accommodation 



were delivered by 34 steamers, the total 
weight of cargo aggregating 32,151 tons, ex- 
clusive of 859,744 feet, board measure, Doug- 
las fir lumber; 680,007 feet, board measure, 
yellow pine lumber; 253,457 feet, board 
measure, white oak lumber, 663 pieces of 
piling, and 230 cross-ties. 

Subsistence Department. 

The operation of the European laborers' 
messes, the colored laborers' kitchens, and 
the line hotels showed a net profit of $4,277,89. 
The operation of the Hotel Tivoli showed a 
net profit of $1,433.34, and there was a net 
loss on restaurants, penitentiary, tugs, and 
dredges of $24.01. The net profit on sub- 
sistence operations was $5 687.22. 

Department of Civil Administration. 
COURTS. 

During the month, 37 civil and 50 criminal 
cases were disposed of in the Supreme and 
Circuit Courts, and 60 civil and 559 criminal 
cases in the District Courts. 

DIVISION OF POSTS, CUSTOMS , AND REVENUES 

Money order sales for August amounted to 
$420,123.54, and the fees to $1,859.02. 
Receipts from stamp and card sales, and 
newspaper postage aggregated $5,978.60. The 
total collection of revenues made by the divi- 
sion was $7,617.30, and the collection on 
account of court fines, costs and fees, 
$3,135.60. 

Twentj'-eight vessels entered at, and 27 
vessels cleared from, the port of Ancon; and 
26 vessels entered at, and 24 vessels cleared 
from, the port of Cristobal. 

DIVISION OF POLICE AND PRISONS. 

The total number of persons arrested was 
548, of whom 498 were men and 50 women. 
Twenty-five nations, or 49 separate states 
and dependencies were represented. The 
total number of arrests for the month was a 
decrease of 13, as compared with July. Thir- 
teen convicts were committed to the peniten- 
tiary, and 15 were discharged, leaving 142 in 
confinement at the close of the month. The 
cost of guarding and subsisting the convicts 
was $2,978.50, and the value of their work on 
Canal Zone roads $2,212.05. 

DIVISION OF FIRE PROTECTION. 

Eight fires were reported in the Canal Zone 
during the month, as compared with 13 in 
July. The damage to Commission property 
was $133, and to private property $5,000. 

DIVISION OF PUBLIC WORKS. 

In the city of Panama the average daily 
consumption of water was 1,383,288 gallons 
and in Colon 904,907 gallons. 

The usual inspection and maintenance 



September 20, 1911. 



THE CANAL RECORD 



31 



work of this division was performed during 
the month. 

Department of Sanitation. 
The total number of deaths from all causes 
among employes was 38, These were divided, 
as follows: From disease, 26, and from vio- 
lence, 12, giving the annual average per thou- 
sand of 6.27 and 2.90, respectively. 

The annual average death rate per thousand 
among employes for the month of August 
in previous years since American occupation 
was, as follows: 

1904 13.93 

1905 19.97 

1906 62.12 

1907 27.59 

1908 11.39 

1909 10.28 

1910 13.04 

The annual average death rate per thou- 
sand in the cities of Panama, Colon, and the 
Canal Zone, including both employes and 
nonemployes, was 20.31. 

The annual average death rate per thousand 
for the month of August among the same class 
of population for previous years was, as 
follows: 

1905 51.05 

1906 64.12 

1907 33.75 

1908 26.65 

1909 16.20 

1910 19.85 

Segregating the whites from the blacks, the 
annual average death rate per thousand from 
disease among employes was: For whites, 
6.45; blacks, 6.23, giving a general average 
of 6.27. For the same month during 1909, the 
annual average death rate per thousand from 
disease was: Whites, 6.19; blacks, 6.10, giving 
a general average of 6.12, and for the same 
month during 1910: Whites, 5.28; blacks, 
8.11, giving a general average of 7.35. 

Among employes during the month, deaths 
from the principal diseases were, as follows: 
Chronic nephritis, 3; haemoglobinuric fever, 
4; lobar pneumonia, 4; malaria fever, E. A., 1; 
tuberculosis, 4; typhoid fever, 1, leaving a 
balance of 9 deaths from all other diseases, 
and 12 deaths from external violence. 

Nineteen cases of diptheria were reported 
during the month, 14 from the Canal Zone, 
3 from Panama, and 2 from Colon, with one 
death. The type of the disease continued mild, 
and there was a marked decrease in the 
number of cases treated. 

No cases of yellow fever, smallpox, or 
plague were brought to, or originated on the 
Isthmus during the month. 

Respectfully, 
Geo. W. Goethals, Chairman. 

Society of the Chagres. 

The recently organized association of em- 
ployes who have completed six years' service 
on the Isthmus will be known as "The Society 
of the Chagres." The emblem of the society 
will be a circular pin, nine-sixteenths of an 
inch in diameter, showing on a black back- 
ground, surrounded by a narrow gold border, 
six horizontal bars in gold. On the back of 
the pin will be engraved the name of the 
society, the name of the member owning the 
pin, and the date on which the latter entered 
the service. On the 16th instant, seventy-five 
charter members had been enrolled. 

Obituary. 

Stephen H. Alton, employed at Porto Bello, 
died at Colon Hospital on September 9. He 
was 41 years of age, single, and had been on 
the Isthmus fourteen months, having come 
from California. 



COM MISSION CLUBHOUSES. 



Activities of the Young Men's Christian Associ- 
ation. 

GENERAL. 

A banquet in honor of Mr. A. B. Dickson will be 
held at the Empire hotel on Friday night, September 
22, at 8.30 o'clock. Mr. Dickson has been promoted 
from secretary of the Empire clubhouse to superin- 
tendent of all the clubhouses under the Commission. 

The official score for the Isthmian tenpin league up 
to Saturday, September 16. follows: 

Won. Lost. P. C. 

Cristobal 12 6 . 667 

Empire 12 6 .667 

Gorgona 12 6 667 

Marines 9 9 . 500 

Gatun 7 11 .388 

Culebra 3 15 .200 

The moving picture schedule, for the week of Sep- 
tember 25 to 30 is. as follows: Monday. Corozal; 
Tuesday, Empire; Wednesday, Culebra; Thursday, 
Gatun; Friday. Cristobal; Saturday, Gorgona. 

COROZAL. 

A "smoker" was held in the gymnasium of the 
Corozal clubhouse on Tuesday evening, September 12. 
The program consisted of an act on the parallel bars 
by Bath and Kramer; a vocal solo by Mrs. Kramer; an 
acrobatic act by Stapleton. and Indian club swinging 
by Mr. Kramer. This was followed by a handcuff 
escape act by Messrs. Bath and Playford. and Mr. 
Holmes concluded the program with a fancy dancing 
act. Refreshments and singing ended the evening's 
entertainment. One hundred and fifty men were 
present. 

CULEBRA. 

A second game of chess by wireless was begun with 
the Porto Bello association two weeks ago. Culebra 
won the first game. 

The volleyball game between the assistant engineers 
and the married men on Tuesday evening, Septem- 
ber 12. resulted in favor of the former by the score of 
3 to 2. The game on Thursday evening, between the 
independents and assistant engineers was won by 
the latter. Score. 3 to 0. 

The motion picture entertainment will be given on 
Friday night. September 22. instead of Saturday night, 
as previously published. 

The Gorgona bowling team took three games at 
bowling from Culebra on Saturday evening, as follows: 
Gorgona. Culebra. 

Otis 164 163 174 Mengel 142 135 152 

Arnold 151 147 159 Driscoll . . . . 166 126 153 

Orr 157 13S 143 Warner.... 137 143 126 

Sims 145 123 161 Hostetter. . . 137 154 130 

Halderman. 182 157 85 Baumer . . 184 160 140 



Total . 



799 725 722 



766 718 701 



GORGONA. 

About twenty were present in "gym" class on Mon- 
day and Thursday nights of last week. Apparatus 
work has been taken up by both squads and, beginning 
with Monday. September 18. a more advanced line of 
work will be adopted. 

In the third game contest of the bowling league on 
the local alleys, the home team took three games from 
Culebra. Following are the scores: 

1st game. 2nd game. 3d game. 

Culebra 703 748 710 

Gorgona. 741 839 864 

EMPIRE. 

The following scores of 200, or over, were bowled 
during the past week: Duckpins — Rodeghiero, 101, 
109, 103. 107, 126; Pulsifer, 105, 101; Danielson. 116; 
King. 113; Grund, 102. Tenpins — Davis. 216; Giavellt. 
222; Snyder. 205 ; Rodeghiero. 2 14. 

The league games bowled on the local alleys oa 
Saturday, September 16. resulted in Empire winning 
three games from Camp Elliott, as follows: 

Empire. Camp Elliott. 

Pinney 139 192 174 McDowell.. 142 133 160 

Giavelli 191 194 181 Tripple 105 

Anderson... 149 178 153 Clouse 178 166 146 

Davis 126 142 144 Austin 139 150 123 

Parkis 168 178 147 Martin 120 131 175 

Janke 156 180 



Total .... 773 884 799 684 736 784 

Owing to other entertainments during the week, the 
literary society will postpone the regular meeting. 
The next meeting will be on Friday night, September 
29. 

On Sunday evening, September 24, there will be 
informal singing at 8.30 o'clock. 

On Saturday evening, September 16. J. L. Malone 
ex-champion pool and billiard player of the United 
States, gave an exhibition on the Empire tables, 
playing Messrs. Smith, Wood, and Sheets a 200-point 
game, and winning 200 to 154. At pool. Malone 
played Pearson and McKeever a 75-point game, the 
former winning i7S to 48. After the games. Malone 



gave an exhibition of fancy and instructive shots in 
both pool and billiards. About 200 men were present . 

CRISTOBAL. 

A "smoker" will be held on Thursday. September 28. 

The subject for debate on Wednesday night, Sep- 
tember 27. at the literary and debating club will be 
"Resolved, that the initiative, referendum, and recall 
constitute the best form of government for the State." 

On Friday night, September 22, J. L. Malone, the 
pool and billiard expert, will give an exhibition of 
fancy pool and billiard playing, beginning at 8 p. m. 
Malone will play against three leading billiard players, 
combined, in the Cristobal Y. M. C. A., and also against 
two leading pool players. 

On Saturday night, the Gorgona bowling team will 
bowl at Cristobal. 

The scores of the Gatun-Cristobal games bowled 
here last week are. as follows: 

Gatun. Cristobal. 

Greene 190 158 119 Gibson 143 162 161 

O'Meara... 197 136 183 Thomas... 126 167 148 
Chamberlain 203 135 138 Burns, T.... 202 168 182 

Galloway... 202 164 147 Bullard 177 201 162 

Barte 209 189 151 Louch 126 199 205 



Total. 



1,001 782 738 



774 897 858 



GATUN. 

The following arc the results of the league games 
bowled at Gatun with the Cristobal team: 

Gatun. Cristobal. 

Hodges 189 154 138 Barrett 156 201 155 

Myers 115 111 Blackburn.. 209 173 173 

DeMoll... 166 148 200 Collins 152 173 130 

Severn 177 188 168 Rabbitt . . . . 140 156 198 

Durand . . . 146 142 183 Furlong . 136 161 124 
Carr 191 



Total. . . .*793 743 880 
♦Cristobal won the tie. 



*793 864 780 



Married . 

SNYDER-SCHUBER— At the Hotel Tivoli in 
Ancon on September 16. Evelyn Schuber to Alban G. 
Snyder, the Rev. Daniel Quijano officiating. Residence. 
Panama. 

WALSH-TRINITE— On September 12. 1911. at 
the Immaculate Conception Catholic Church, Colon, 
Harry L. Walsh to Henriette R. Trinite, both of Balti- 
more, Md.; Rev. Jose P. Volk officiating. Canal Zone 
residence, Cristobal. 

FAY-CONNOR— At Culebra on September 12. 
Mary Connor of South Manchester, Conn., to Arthur 
E. Fay of Rockville. Conn., the Rev. Father Collins 
officiating. Canal Zone residence. Culebra. 

STAPLES-ARCHER— At Tabernilla on Septem- 
ber 10. Edith Lulla Archer to Thomas O. Staples, the 
Rev. W. H. Decker officiating. Canal Zone residence, 
Tabernilla. 

MOFFAT-McGOWAN— At Ancon on September 
11, Margaret B. McGowan of Cincinnati, Ohio, to 
David H. Moffat, of Cincinnati. Ohio, the Rev. Daniel 
Quijano officiating. Canal Zone residence. Balboa. 



Band Concert. 

A band concert will be given by the Isthmian Canal 
Commission Band at Empire. C. Z.. on Sunday, Sep- 
ber 24, 1911, at 6 p. m. The program follows: 

1. March — Eccentric Reeves 

2. Selection — The Spring Maid Reinhardt 

3. Reverie — Silent Thought Morrison 

4. Overture — Morning, Noon, and Night 

in Vienna. .Suppe 

5. Waltz — Casino'Tanze Gung'I 

6. (a) — Chicken Reel Daly 

(b) — Casey Jones Newton 

7. Romance — A Tale of Two Hearts Roberts 

8. Medley of popular songs — Remick's Hits. .Lampe 

9. March — Unler dent Siegesbanner Von Blon 

Charles E. Jennings. Musical Director. 
The next concert will be given at Las Cascadas, C. Z., 
on October 1. at 6 p. m. 



Tide Table. 

The following table shows the time of high and low 
tides at Panama for the week ending September 27. 
1911 (75th meridian time): 



Date. 


Low. 


High. 


Low. 


High. Low 




A.M. 


A.M. 

2.25 
3.15 
3.57 
4.40 
5. 15 
5.52 

6.30 


A.M. 

8.40 

9.30 
10. 10 
10.53 
11.35 
12.15 

P.M. 
12.50 


P.M. ' P.M. 
2.50 9 00 






3.35 
4.20 
5.00 
5.40 
6.20 

6.55 


9.50 






10.30 






11.10 






11.50 








September 27 


.12.30 





Lost — At Culebra on September 13, a double case 
gold watch with Canal medal fob. Return to office of 
the Chairman. Culebra. 



32 



THE CANAL RECORD 



Vol. V., No. 4. 



OFFICIAL CIRCULARS. 



Requests for Sanitation Work. 

Culebra, C- Z., September 13, 1911. 
Circular No. 183-F-2: 

Requests on the different departments and divisions 
for the performance of sanitary work of the kinds 
mentioned therein for the Department of Sanitation 
will, hereafter, he preferred in accordance with the 
following, and all existing orders inconsistent herewith 
are to that extent abrogated: 

1. Grass and brush cutting on all new areas which 
have heretofore not been cut, and on areas which have 
not been cut for the Department of Sanitation by the 
Quartermaster's Department within two years shall, 
if the areas exceed two acres in extent, be requested 
on form C E. 159. and receive my approval before 
the work is taken in hand. 

2. All new construction work in connection with 
ditching and drainage, the estimated cost of which 
exceeds $50, performed by the construction divisions 
for the Department of Sanitation, shall be requested on 
form C. E. 159, and receive my approval before the 
work is taken in hand. 

3. All new construction work in connection with 
ditching and drainage, the estimated cost of which 
does not exceed $50. performed by the construction 
divisions for the Department of Sanitation, shall be 
performed by the former on the request of district 
sanitary inspectors on form S. D. 47. 

4. All maintenance work, i. e., superficial ditching, 
clearing, repairing of drains, etc., shall be performed 
by the different divisions promptly on the request of 
district sanitary inspectors on form S D. 47. 

Geo. VV. Goethals, 
Chairman and Chief Engineer . 



Classified Expenditure Accounts. 

Empire. C.Z., September 14, 1911. 
Circular No. 33; 

Effective at once, the following classified expenditure 
accounts are authorized: 

Department of Construction and Engineering-General — 

351. Lighting and buoying the Canal. 
(a) Construction. 

To this account will be charged all labor, material, 
and other expenses incidental to lighting and buoying 
the Canal, including buoys, beacons, and lighthouses. 
Cb) Plant. 

To this account will be charged all plant heretofore, 
or hereafter, purchased or used in the work of lighting 
and buoying the Canal; also charged with plant trans- 
ferred from, and credited with plant transferred to 
other divisions. 

Fortifications — 

501. Armament of fortifications. * 

To this account will be charged the cost of purchase, 
manufacture, and test of sea coast cannon for coast 
defense, including their carriages, sights, implements, 
and the machinery necessary for the manufacture at 
the arsenals. 

502. Sea coast batteries. 

To this account will be charged all labor, material, 
and other expenses incidental to the construction of 
sea coast batteries in the Canal Zone. 

H. A. A. Smith, Examiner of Accounts. 
Approved: Geo. W. Goethals, 

Chairman and Chief Engineer. 



Scytheman Rating. 

Culebra, C.Z., September 18. 1911. 
Circular No. 229-t: 

The rite of 13 cents per hour for West Indian scythe- 
r.icn is hereby authorized. 

Geo. W. Goethals, 
Chairman and Chief Engineer. 



Third Division of the Office of the Chief Engineer 
during the absence of Mr. C. M. Saville, Assistant 
Engineer, on leave. 

Geo. W. Goethals, 
Chairman and Chief Engineer. 



Acting Division Engineer, Pacific Division. 
Culebra. C. Z., September 16, 1911. 
Circular No. 409: 

Effective September 18. 191 1 , Mr. John M. G. Watt 
will act as Division Engineer, Pacific Division, during 
the absence of Mr. S. B. Williamson, on leave. 

Geo. W. Goethals, 
Chairman and Chief Engineer. 



Acting Chief Quartermaster. 

Culebra, C. Z., September 16, 1911. 
Circular No. 408: 

Effective September 18, 1911. Captain R. E. Wood 
will act as Chief Quartermaster during the absence of 
Lieutenant-Colonel C. A. Devol. on leave. 

Geo. W. Goethals, 
Chairman and Chief Engineer. 



In Charge of Third Division. 

Culebra, C. Z.. September 16, 1911. 
Circular No. 407: 

Effective September 17, 1911, Mr. Guy O. Fraser, 
Junior Engineer, will be in charge of the work of the 



MOVEMENT OF OCEAN VESSELS. 



Misdirected Letters. 



Ancon, C. Z., September 20, 1911. 
The following insufficiently addressed letters, origi- 
nating in the United States and its possessions, have 
been received in the office of the Director of Posts, and 
may be secured upon request of the addressee: 



Baird, T. W. 
Benjamin. Mrs. Eliza 
Benson, Robey W. 
Briggs. C. B. 
Buck. Mrs. C. C. 
Burke, Wm. 
Carr, Frank L. 
Connor, P. J. 
Corrigan, C. P. 
Croll, Harry 
Gibson. John 
Harris. William 
Keeling. Mrs. E. A. 
Kennedy, Gordon 
Klenner, S. J. 
Kohan, Mr. 



Kozak, Otto 
Lawrence, B. A. 
Lensen, Mrs. Hannah 
Mantooth. Anderson 
McKeon, Wm. 
Mice!, Chas. 
Palmer, Levi B. (2) 
Perry, Butler F. 
Post, G. 

Ridenhouse, J. P. 
Riebe, Burton 
Sargent, Don C. 
Sneed, C. D. 
Stroub, Alvin 
Thomas, Mrs. B. S. 



Rainfall from September 1 to 16, 1911 


Inclusive. 


Stations. 


.5 

X c 

n) o 

s 


Q 


SI 


Pacific Section — 


Ins. 

.96 

1.51 

1.05 

.92 

.77 

.78 

.70 

.64 

.63 

.91 

1.11 

1.35 

.58 

.44 

.35 

.46 

2.00 

.38 

.67 

1.54 

2.47 


4 
1 
2 
2 
8 

3 
8 
5 
5 
5 
7 
12 
5 
2 
5 
1 
1 

5 
1 
1 
S 


Ins. 
2.64 




3.77 




4.05 




3.72 




3.26 


Central Section — 


2.90 




3.24 




2.78 




2.49 




3.56 




2.89 

3.77 




1.92 




1.17 




.95 




1.34 




4.47 


Atlantic Section — 


1.44 




2.91 




3.87 




t6.21 



♦Standard rain gage — readings at 5 p. m. daily. 
Automatic rain gage at unstarred stations — values 
midnight to midnight. iTo 5 p. m., September 15. 



Stages of the Chagres. 

Maximum heights of theChagres River for the week 
ending midnight, Saturday. September 16, 1911. All 
heights are in feet above mean sea level. 





Station. 


Day and Date. 


Vigia. 


V 

x: 
< 


o 
B 
O 


d 

o 
m 


c . 
p a; 


Sun., Sept. 10. . 
Mon., Sept. 11 . 
Tues., Sept. 12 . 
Wed., Sept. 13 . 
Thurs., Sept. 14 
Fri.,Sept. 15.. . 
Sat., Sept. 16. . 


126.2 
126.0 
126.2 
126.6 
126.8 
126.6 
126.1 


92.8 
92.6 
92.6 
93.0 
93.2 
93.2 
92.6 


45.9 
45.5 
45.7 
45.8 
45.6 
45.9 
45.4 


14.6 
14.4 
14.2 
14.0 
13.9 
13.8 
13.8 


14.5 
14.3 
14.2 
14.0 
13.8 
13.8 
13.7 


Height of low 
water 


125.0 


92 


44,0 



















Sale of Buffalo Gasoline Engine. 

Office of Depot Quartermaster, 
Mount Hope, C. Z.. September 14, 1911. 
Sealed bids will be received at the office of the 
Depot Quartermaster, Mount Hope, C. Z., until two 
o'clock p. m., September 25, 1911, when they will be 
opened in the presence of attending bidders, for one 
7 J horsepower Buffalo gasoline engine, equipped with 
reverse lever, and weighing approximately five hundred 
pounds. Engine may be seen and examined on any 
working day between the hours of seven to eleven 
a. m., and one to five p. m., upon application at this 
office. The right is reserved to reject any or all bids. 
Bids must be plainly marked "Proposal to purchase 
one gasoline engine, to be opened September 25, 191 1," 
and addressed to the Depot Quartermaster, Mount 
Hope, C. Z. 

C. Nixon, Depot Quartermaster. 



Found — A "B. P. O. E." card, made out to Cary 
P. Taylor. Address R. C. Shady, Gorgona, C. Z. 



The following is a list of the sailings of the Panama 
Railroad Steamship Company; of the Royal Mail 
Steam Packet Company; of the Hamburg-American 
Line, and of the United Fruit Company's Line; the 
Panama Railroad Company's dates being subject to 
change. 

NEW YORK TO CRISTOBAL. 

Colon P. R. R.. Monday... Sept. 18 

Panama P. R. R.Friday Sept. 29 

Advance P. R. R .Thursday.. Oct. 5 

Colon P. R. R.Thursday.. Oct. 12 

Allianca P. R. R . WednesdayOct. 18 

Panama P. R. R .Tuesday.. .Oct. 24 

Advance P. R. R .Monday. . .Oct. 30 

CRISTOBAL TO NEW YORK. 

Advance P. R. R .Saturday . .Sept. 23 

Ancon P. R. R .Thursday. .Sept. 28 

Colon P. R. R.Saturday. .Sept. 30 

Panama P. R. R .Thursday. . Oct. 12 

Advance P. R. R..Tuesday. . . Oct. 1 7 

Colon P. R. R.Tuesday... Oct. 24 

Allianca P. R. R . Monday. . . Oct. 30 

Panama P. R. R .Sunday.. . .Nov. 5 

Advance P. R. R.Saturday. .Nov. 11 

NEW YORK TO COLON. 

Zacapa IT. F. C. Thursday. Sept. 14 

Prinz Eitel Friedrich H.-A Friday Sept. 15 

Magdalena R. M . . .Saturday. .Sept. 16 

Almirante U. F. C. . Thursday. . Sept. 2 1 

Prinz August Wilhelm . . .H.-A Saturday. .Sept. 23 

Santa Marta..* U. F. G. Thursday.. Sept. 28 

Prinz Sigismund H.-A. . . . Friday . . . .Sept. 29 

Clyde R. M Saturday. .Sept. 30 

Metapan U. F. C. Thursday.. Oct. 5 

Prinz Joachim H.-A. . . . Saturday. .Oct. 7 

Zacapa U. F. C. Thursday.. Oct. 12 

Prinz Eitel Friedrich H.-A .... Friday .... Oct. 13 

Atrato R. M... .Saturday. .Oct. 14 

Almirante U. F. C. Thursday.. Oct. 19 

Prinz August Wilhelm.. . .H.-A. . . .Saturday. .Oct. 21 

Santa Marta U. F. C. Thursday.. Oct. 26 

Thames R. M Saturday . . Oct. 28 

COLON TO NEW YORK. 

Metapan U. F. C .Thursday. .Sept. 21 

Prinz Joachim . .H.-A. . . .Tuesday.. .Sept. 26 

Zacapa U. F. C .Thursday. .Sept. 28 

Prinz Eitel Friedrich H.-A. . . .Saturday. .Sept. 30 

Atrato R. M.. .Tuesday.. .Oct. 3 

Almirante U. F. C. Thursday.. Oct. 5 

Prinz August Wilhelm . . . H.-A. . . . Tuesday. . . Oct. 10 

Santa Marta U. F. C. Thursday.. Oct. 12 

Prinz Sigismund H.-A. . . .Saturday. .Oct. 14 

Thames R. M... .Tuesday.. .Oct. 17 

Metapan U. F. C. Thursday.. Oct. 19 

Prinz Joachim H.-A. . . .Tuesday.. .Oct. 24 

Zacapa U. F. C. Thursday.. Oct. 26 

Trent R. M . . .Tuesday.. .Oct. 31 

NEW ORLEANS TO COLON. 

Atenas U F. C. Saturday. .Sept. 16 

Heredia U. F. C. WednesdaySept. 20 

Turrialba U. F. C. . Saturday . . Sept. 23 

Abangarez U. F. C. . Saturday . . Sept. 30 

Parismina U. F. C. WednesdayOct. 4 

Atenas U. F. C. Saturday. .Oct. 7 

Cartago U. F. C. Wednesday .Oct. 11 

Turrialba U. F. C. Saturday. .Oct. 14 

Abangarez U. F. C. Saturday. .Oct. 21 

COLON TO NEW ORLEANS. 

Parismina U. F. C. Thursday. . Sept. 21 

Abangarez U. F. C. Thursday.. Sept. 21 

Heredia U. F. C. Thursday.. Sept. 28 

Atenas U. F. C. Thursday.. Sept. 28 

Cartago U. F. C. Thursday.. Oct. 5 

Turrialba U. F. C. . Thursday. .Oct. 5 

Parismina U. F. C. Thursday. .Oct. 12 

Abangarez U. F. C. Thursday. .Oct. 12 

Heredia U. F. C. Thursday.. Oct. 19 

Hamburg-American steamers leave Colon for New 
York via Kingston at 10 a. m. on sailing dates. The 
Prinz August Wilhelm and Prinz Joachim call at 
Santiago de Cuba, on both outward and homeward 
voyages. 

Royal Mail steamers leave for New York on alter- 
nate Tuesdays, at 10 a. m.; for Southampton on alter- 
nate Tuesdays at 10 a. m. 

United Fruit Company's ships for New Orleans 
direct, leave on Thursdays at 3 p. m.; ships for New 
Orleans in the coastwise service on Thursdays at 4 p. m.; 
ships for New York via Kingston on Thursdays at 1 1 
a. m.; for Bocas del Toio on Mondays at 6 p. m. 

The Leyland line steamer Louisinian sails for New 
Orleans direct on or about September 28. 



CANAL 




RECORD 



Volume V. ANCON, CANAL ZONE, WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 27, 1911. No. 5. 



The Canal Record 

Published weekly under the authority and supervision of 
the Isthmian Canal Commission. 



The Canal Record is issued free of charge, one copy 
each, to aU employes of the Commission and Panama 
Railroad Company whose names are on the gold roll. 
Extra copies and back numbers can be obtained from the 
news stands of the Panama Railroad Company for five 
cents each. 

Address all Communications 

THE CANAL RECORD, 

Ancon, Canal Zone, 

Isthmus of Panama. 

No communication, either for publication jr requesting 
information, will receive attention unless signed with the 
full name an J address of the writer. 



NOTES OF PROGRESS. 



Canal Record Index. 

The index to Volume 4 of The Canal 
Record, in form suitable for binding with the 
year's issues of the paper, will be ready for 
distribution shortly. It will be sent free, on 
application, to such persons, institutions, 
libraries, etc., as desire to preserve their 
copies of The Canal Record in book form. 
Application should be made to the Secretary, 
Isthmian Canal Commission, Ancon, C. Z. 



Setting Machinery at Locks. 

The work of setting machinery for the 
operation of the locks was begun last week 
by an organization reporting direct to the 
Assistant Chief Engineer, under whose direc- 
tion will be carried on the operations of setting 
in the masonry of the locks and spillways 
locomotive tracks, chain fenders, valve 
machinery, gate machinery, recess covers, 
bridges, manhole covers, and all parts 
accessory to mechanical and electrical in- 
stallation. The first work taken up was the 
preparation of foundations for the machines 
that will operate two of the Stoney gate 
valves on the west wall of the locks at Gatun. 
A division of duties has been arranged, where- 
by the forces cf the construction divisions 
will cooperate with the erecting forces of the 
Assistant Chief Engineer. 

The erecting force will lay practically all 
the rack track for the towing system, that is, 
the towing tracks and the part of the return 
tracks on the inclines between the locks. 
This includes also the installation of the 
copper rails in side conduits for the trans- 
mission of current to the locomotives. It 
will install the fender chain machines, includ- 
ing eight chains at Gatun, Pedro Miguel, and 
Miraflores, 24 in all; with 48 machines for 
lifting and lowering them, 48 centrifugal 
pumps for operating the hydraulically driven 
machines, 48 motors for operating the pumps, 
and 4S sump pumps. 

The placing of the Stoney gate and cylin- 
drical valves will be done by the construction 



divisions or, at their order, by the erecting 
force, but the machines for operating these 
valves will be installed by the erecting force. 
There are 1 1 6 of these machines for the Stoney 
gate valves, and 120 for the cylindrical valves, 
and one motor for each machine. 

Machines for operating the miter gates will 
be installed by the erecting force. These 
include 92 mechanisms for operating the 
gates, and 46 for forcing the miter ends 
together. 

The covers over the miter gate recesses will 
be installed by the McClintic-Marshall Con- 
struction Company, under the direction of 
the Assistant Chief Engineer. These will be 
built of steel cantilevers anchored into the 
masonry of the lock walls, properly braced 
and decked over with concrete. There will 
be recess covers over all the gate machines, 
excepting those for the lower guard gates, 12 
in number, the total number of recesses to be 
covered, therefore, being 80. The covers are 
necessary in order to take the towing loco- 
motive tracks. 



Lock Operations at Miraflores. 

The deepest steam shovel cut in the lower 
lock at Miraflores is down to 46 feet below 
mean sea level, or within five feet of finished 
floor grade. Six steam shovels are work- 
ing in the pit, two of them excavating 
close to the upper lock sill, and construc- 
tion of the floor and lateral culvert sys- 
tem will be begun as soon as enough mate- 
rial has been removed from this end. 
The trenches for the floor culverts will be 
excavated by hand, locomotive cranes being 
employed to lift the buckets of material into 
dump cars. Concrete operations in the upper 
lock are, at present, confined largely to the 
west and center walls, and to foundations of 
the center wall in the forebay. The east 
wall lacks a few feet only at the north end to 
complete it nearly the length of the upper 
lock, with the exception of the niche in it 
occupied by the auxiliary mixer. The iron 
work on berm crane "E," the last of the berm 
cranes to be set up at Miraflores Locks, is 
finished, and the electricians now have it in 
charge. 

Increased Water Supply. 

In order to increase the water supply for 
the city of Panama, it has been decided to lay 
a new 20-inch main from the Rio Grande 
reservoir to replace the 16-inch main now in 
use, and a requisition for the necessary' material 
for the work has been forwarded. To in- 
crease the pressure, without the delay inci- 
dental to the laying of this line, it is proposed 
to install an additional 10-inch discharge pipe 
from the Cocoli pumping plant to connect 
with the 16-inch main, which will give two 
10-inch discharge lines from the Cocoli reser- 
voir. Heretofore, the two pumps at the Cocoli 
station have been pumping into one pipe, but 
as soon as the new main is laid, there will be 



one pipe for each. It is further proposed to 
install a 12-inch centrifugal pump, now on 
hand, to furnish auxiliary pressure to the 
water flowing through the Rio Grande main. 
This pump has a rated capacity of 3,500 
gallons per minute against a head of 70 feet. 
It will take the water from the main, and 
discharge again into the main at some distance 
from the intake under an increased pressure, 
thus acting as a "booster" pump. 

Xew pumping equipment has been rec- 
ommended for the Cocoli station, the instal- 
lation of which, it is believed, will completely 
relieve the present situation. This equipment 
is planned to consist of two motor-driven 
pumps capable of supplying 1,500 gallons of 
water per minute against a head of 300 feet. 
Later, this plant can be transferred to Ancon, 
and used to increase the facilities there, which 
are becoming inadequate owing to the heavy 
water consumption from the high pressure 
reservoir on Ancon Hill. 



Stockade on Empire-Chorrera Road. 

A stockade has been built by the Division 
of Public Works on the new Empire-Chorrera 
road, about four miles out of Empire, for the 
housing of the convicts, and the accommo- 
dation of their guards, during the construction 
of the road to the Canal Zone boundary 
line. The building is situated at one end of 
a spacious yard, irregular in shape, formed 
by the leveling off of the top of a knoll, and 
stands at an elevation of about 45 feet above 
the bed of the Mandingo River, which partly 
encircles the hill. The yard is enclosed by 
an 8-foot double fence, spaced four feet apart, 
affording a passageway for the officer on 
patrol. Each fence is strung with close rows 
of barbed wire on both sides, making four 
thicknesses in all, and over the top there has 
been placed slanting barbed wire guards to 
prevent the inmates from climbing out of 
the enclosure. The total length of the out- 
side fence is about 700 feet. 

The building is 35 by 150 feet in size, and 
its walls are constructed of native material; 
the uprights consist of young trees, felled in 
the vicinity, averaging eight inches in 
diameter, on which cross pieces of the same 
material, averaging four inches in diameter, 
have been fastened with 6-inch iron spikes. 
The outward sides of the walls, up to within 
three feet of the roof, are covered with canvas 
as a protection from the weather. The space 
between the canvas and the roof has been 
left open for light and ventilation, but is 
screened in. The interior of the building is 
divided into two cells, a living room for the 
white officers, another for the colored officers, 
a separate living room and office for the 
corporal in charge, a dining room, kitchen, 
an individual cell for refractory prisoners, 
and a store room. The cells are of equal size, 
35 by 44 feet, and open upon a corridor, six 
feet wide, from which the prisoners pass at one 
end, into the dining room and at the other end 



34 



THE CANAL RECORD 



Vol. V., No. 5. 



NOTES OF PROGRESS, 



(Continued.) 



to the yard outside. They are s'tuated be- 
tween the quarters for white and colored 
officers, and are provided with Standee berths 
in rows of three, occupying the center of the 
room, so that there is space to move about 
on all sides. The rows of berths are arranged 
so that they can open in each direction. 
Each of the cells will have sleeping accommo- 
dations for about 70 men, or a total of 140 in 
all, and about this number will be employed 
on the road. There are also outside entrances 
to both the white and colored officers' 
quarters. 

Supplies will be packed on horseback from 
the Culebra penitentiary, and water will be 
pumped by hand from a nearby creek into 
two tanks within the stockade. The road has 
been completed for a little over two of its six 
miles of distance. 



Gatun Dam Spillway ■ 

The concrete work in the Spillway of Gatun 
Dam is about 70 per cent completed, 156,406 
cubic yards, out of a total of 225,000, having 
been placed at the close of work on Septem- 
ber 23. A statement of the amount laid each 
working day last week, and of the total in 
place, follows: 



Date. Concrete Hours 
Laid. worked. 


No. 
Mixers. 




164 
172 
156 
138 
146 
108 


7.30 
11.30 
7.30 
6.00 
6.30 
6.00 


1 


September 19 


2 
1 








1 




1 






Total 

Previously reported . . . 


884 
155,522 


45.00 


1.16 




156.406 





Ancon Crusher- 

A statement of rock crushed at Ancon 
quarry during the two weeks ending Septem- 
ber 23, follows: 



Date. 



Cubic 
Yards. 



September 11 ... . 
September 12 ... , 
September 13 ... , 
September 14 ... , 
September 15 ... , 
September 16 ... , 

Total 

Date 

September 18 ... , 
September 19 ... , 
September 20 ... , 
September 21 ... , 
September 22 ... , 
September 23 . . . 

Total 




2.340 
2.489 
2,554 
2,260 
2,336 
2,332 



14,311 



Hours 
worked. 



Cubic 
Yards. 



46.25 



7.20 


2,782 


8.05 


2.422 


7.30 


3,250 


7.15 


2,676 


8.20 


3,014 


7.55 


2,658 



16,802 



Visit of Congressmen. 

It is expected that a party of United States 
Senators will visit the Canal work during the 
last week of October, and the early part of 
November. 

The Committee on Appropriations of the 
House of Representatives will leave New York 
on or about November 8 for a visit to the 
Isthmus, during which time it will conduct 
hearings on the estimates of appropriations 
needed for the Canal work in the fiscal year 
1913. 

It is expected that the House of Represent- 
atives Committee on Interstate and Foreign 



Commerce will visit the Isthmus during the 
early part of December. 



Excavation Record in Culebra District. 

On September 20, twenty-one shovels, 
working in the Culebra construction district 
of the Central .Division, excavated 37,203 
cubic yards of rock and earth during the 
working day of eight hours, an average per 



shovel for every shovel working in the 

district, of 1,771.6 cubic yards per day. 

The shovels were under steam 168 hours; at 
work 121 hours and 25 minutes, and waiting 
for cars 33 hours and 5 minutes. The rest of 
the time — 13 hours and 30 minutes — was lost 
in repairing shovels, cleaning track, cleaning 
dipper, mining, repairing track, moving 
shovel back, etc. 



CONCRETE WORK IN THE LOCKS. 



About 66 per cent of the concrete for all the locks is in place, the amount at the close of 
the work on September 23, being 2,765,774^ cubic yards, out of a total of approximately 
4,199,400. A total of 33, 579J cubic yards of concrete was laid in the locks during the week 
ending September 23. 

GATUN LOCKS. 

Over 80 per cent of the concrete for the system of three twin locks at Gatun has been 
laid, the amount in place at the close of work on September 23, being 1,611,067| cubic yards, 
out of a total of 2,000,000. A statement of the amount of concrete placed in the locks each 
working day for the week ending September 23, and of the total, follows; and a similar state- 
ment for the work in the Spillway of Gatun Dam is published elsewhere in this issue. The 
construction plant works 12 hours daily, and the auxiliary plant 9 hours. 



Date. 



Construction Plant. 
2-cubic yard mixers. 



Concrete 
placed . 



Hours 
worked. 



No. of 
mixers 



Auxiliary Plant. 
2-cubic yard mixers. 



Concrete 
olaced. 



Hours 
worked. 



No. of 
mixers 



Large 
stone. 



Total. 



September 18 

September 19 

September 20 

September 21 

September 22 

September 23 

♦Portable mixers . 



Cu 



Yds. 

630 
2.068 
2,270 
2,054 
1,580 
1,962 



11,564 



24.26 
31.46 
34.44 
31.10 
23.40 
32.24 



Cu. 



2,427!. 37.00 



706 



Total 

Previously reported 

Grand total . 1.611,0674 



Yds j 
SO I 
472 I 
476 i 
342 
358 
232 I 
467J 



40 
40 
40 
40 
40 
40 



|C«, 



Yds. 

154 
90 
80 

144 
94 

144 



Cu 



Yds. 
1,864 
2,630 
2,826 
2,540 
2.032 
2,338 
467 J 



14.697J 
1,596,370 



*The 467 i yards shown for the portable mixers are reinforced concrete, and were placed on the following days : 
September 18th. 80S; September 19th. 70S; September 20th, 80S; September 21st, 71; September 22nd, t6J; 
September 23d, 785. 

PEDRO MIGUEL LOCKS. 

Concrete work in the locks at Pedro Aliguel is about 87 per cent completed, 727,086 ci bic 
yards, out of a total of 837,400, bucket measurement, having been placed at the close of work 
on September 23. The record for each of the six 8-hour working days of last week, follows: 



Date. 



Auxiliary Plant. 



2-cubic yard mixers. 



Concrete 
placed . 



5-cubic yard mixer. 



Hours | No. of Concrete 
worked, mixers placed. 



Hours 
worked . 



No. of 
mixers 



Large 
stone. 



Total. 



September 18 . 
September 19 . 
September 20 . 
September 21 . 
September 22 . 
September 23 . 



CU. ) ,/:. 






576 


18.00 


3 


444 


15.00 


3 


508 


11.00 


3 


894 


20.00 


3 


500 


12.00 


3 


542 


12.00 


3 



Cu. Yds. 
63 
221 
89 
125 
93 
42 



Total 

Previously reported. 

Grand total 



3,464 



633 



3.50 
11.40 
4.00 
5.17 
5.00 
2.00 



31.07 



Cu. Yds. 



1.67 



4,411 



Cu. Yds. 
639 
665 
597 
1,019 
593 
584 



4.097 
722,989 



727,086 



MIRAFLORES LOCKS. 

Over 31 per cent of the concrete for the system of two twin locks at Miraflores was in 
place on September 23, the total amount on that date being 427,621 cubic yards, bucket 
measurement, out of a total of approximately 1,362,000. The record for each of the six 8-hour 
working days of last week, follows: 



Date. 



Construction Plant. 
2-cubic yard mixers. 



Concrete 
placed. 



Auxiliary Plant. 



2-cubic yard mixers. 



J-cubic yard mixer. 



Hours No. of.Concrete Hours No. of Concrete 
worked, mixers! placed, worked, mixers placed. 



Hours No. of Large 
worked, mixers stone. 



Total. 



Sept. 18.. 
Sept. 19. . 
Sept. 20. . 
Sept. 21.. 
Sept. 22.. 
Sept. 23. . 


Cu. Yds. 
800 
1,264 
1.254 
1.158 
1.104 
648 


21.17 
30.67 
26.83 
29.33 
25.20 
19.00 


5 
6 
4 
6 
6 
4 


Cu. Yds. 
1.162 
1.202 
1.192 
1.262 
1.042 
1.208 


17.67 
15.33 
14.23 
16.00 
14.70 
16.87 


2 
2 
2 
2 
2 
2 


Cu. Yds. 
234 
188 
201 
325 
257 
284 


23.00 
17.00 
17.00 
31.00 
24.00 
24.50 


4 
3 
4 
4 
4 
4 


Cu. Yds. 


Cu. Yds. 
2,196 
2,654 
2,647 
2.745 
2,403 
2,140 


Total . . 
Previously 
reported . 


6,228 


152.20 


5.17 


7.068 


94 80 


2 


1.489 


136.50 


3.83 


3,693 


14,785 
412.836 






















Grand 


3,693 


427,621 

























September 27, 1911. 



THE CANAL RECORD 



35 



EXECUT IVE ORDERS 

Establishing the Postal Savings System in the 

Canal Zone — Prohibiting Placing of Signs. 

By virtue of the authority vested in me, I 
hereby establish the following Order for the 
Canal Zone: 

Section 1. There is hereby established in 
the post-offices of the Canal Zone a postal 
savings system, to be opera ed without the 
payment of interest on the deposits, under 
such rules and regulations as may be now or 
hereafter adopted. 

Section 2. There is hereby created a Board 
of Trustees for the control, supervision, and 
administration of the postal savings deposi- 
tory offices designated and established under 
the provisions of this Order, and of the funds 
received as deposits at such postal savings 
depository offices by virtue thereof. Said 
board shall consist of the Collector of Rev- 
enues of the Canal Zone, the Auditor of the 
Canal Zone Government, and the Treasurer of 
the Canal Zone, severally, acting exofficio, 
and shall have power to make all necessary 
and proper regulations for. the receipt, trans- 
mittal, custody, deposit, investment, and 
repayment of the funds deposited at postal 
savings depository offices; the regulations 
above mentioned to be subject to the approval 
of the Chairman of the Isthmian Canal Com- 
mission. 

Section 3. Said Board of Trustees is hereby 
authorized and empowered to designate such 
post-offices as it may select to be postal 
savings depository offices, and each and every 
post-office so designated by order of said 
Board is hereby declared to be a postal 
savings depository office within the meaning 
of this Order, and to be authorized and 
required to receive deposits of funds from the 
public, and to account for and dispose of the 
same, according to the provisions of this 
Order and the regulations made in pursuance 
thereof. Each postal savings depository 
office shall be kept open for the transaction 
of business during such hours as the Collector 
of Revenues shall direct. 

Section 4. That accounts may be opened 
and deposits made in any postal savings 
depository established under this Order by 
any person of the age of ten years or over, in 
his or her own name, and by a married 
woman in her own name, and free from any 
control or interference by her husband; but 
no person shall at the same time have more 
than one postal savings account in his or her 
own right. 

Section 5. At least one dollar, or a larger 
amount in multiples thereof, must be de- 
posited before an account is opened with a 
person depositing the same; and one dollar, 
or multiples thereof, may be deposited after 
such account has been opened. Postal 
savings deposits will be evidenced by postal 
savings certificates issued in fixed denomina- 
tions of SI, S2, S5, S10, S20, S50. S100, each 
bearing the name of the depositor, the 
number of his account, the date of issue, and 
the name of the depository office. 

Section 6. Any depositor may withdraw 
the whole or any part of the funds deposited 
to his or her credit upon demand, and under 
such regulations as the Board of Trustees 
may prescribe. 

Section 7. Postal savings funds received 
under the provisions of this Order shall be 
deposited with the Treasurer of the Canal 
Zone, under such regulations as the Board of 
Trustees may prescribe. 

Section 8. Postal savings depository funds 



shall be kept separate from other funds by 
postmasters and other officers and employes 
of the postal service, who shall be held to the 
same accountability under their bonds for 
such funds as for public moneys; and no per- 
son connected with the Post-Office Depart- 
ment shall disclose to any person other than 
the depositor the amount of any deposits, 
unless directed so to do by the Collector of 
Revenues. 

Section 9. That the final judgment, order, 
or decree of any court of competent j urisdiction 
adjudicating any right or interest in the 
credit of any sum^deposited by any person 
with the postal savings depository, if the 
same shall not have been appealed from, and 
the time for appeal have expired, upon sub- 
mission to the Collector of Revenues of a 
copy of the same, duly authenticated in the 
manner provided by the laws of the United 
States for the authentication of the records 
and judicial proceedings of the courts of any 
state or territory, or of any possession subject 
to the jurisdiction of the United States, when 
the same are proved or admitted within any 
other court within the United States, shall be 
accepted by the Board of Trustees as con- 
clusive of the title, right, interest, or posses- 
sion so adjudicated; and any payment of said 
sum in accordance with such order, judgment, 
or decree shall operate as a full and complete 
discharge of the United States and the Canal 
Zone Government from the claim or demand 
of any person or persons to the same. 

Section 10. This Order shall take effect 
and be in force sixty days from and after this 
date. 

Wh. H, Taft. 
The White House, 

September8, 1911. 



8.15 o'clock. All Jewish residents of the Canal 
Zone are cordially invited. 



To Prohibit the Placing of Signs on Lands and 

Property of the United States and the 

Panama Railroad Company. 

By virtue of the authority vested in me, I 
hereby establish the following Executive 
Order for the Canal Zone: 

Section 1. It shall be unlawful for any per- 
son to construct or place any sign, bill, 
poster, or other advertising device on any 
land, building, or other structure owned or 
controlled by the United States or the Panama 
Railroad Company in the Canal Zone; and 
any person thus offending shall be punished by 
a fine of not less than five dollars, nor 
more than twenty-five dollars, or by im- 
prisonment in jail not to exceed thirty days, 
or by both such fine and imprisonment in the 
discretion of the court; and every day that 
such sign, bill, poster, or other advertising 
device shall remain upon such lands or 
structures shall be deemed a separate offense. 
Provided, however, that this Order shall not 
be construed to prevent persons from adver- 
tising by means of any such advertising 
devices the business that they may be con- 
ducting according to law in any building or 
other structure upon which such advertising 
device is constructed or placed. 

Section 2. This Order shall take effect 
sixty days from and after this date. 

Wh. H. Taft. 
The White House, 

September 8, 1911. 



PERSONAL. 



Captain Courtland Nixon, accompanied by 
his mother, Mrs. J. B. Nixon, leaves on the 
Zacapa on Thursday, September 28, for New 
York, on his annual leave of absence. 



Assignment of Teachers. 

The assignment of teachers of the white 
schools for the school year beginning October 
1, 1911, has been made, as follows: 

Ancon — Jessie E. Daniels (principal), 
Frederika Hine, Emma M. Cobban, Virginia 
Best, Clara L. Voyles, Gertrude B. Hoffman, 
Jessie W. Clark. 

Pedro Miguel — Ruth Hall (principal), Dove 
L. Prather, Blanche A. Bradley. 

Paraiso — Grace E. Snediker. 

Culebra — Mildred O. Bates (principal), 
Jennie M. Dunlap, Hattie L. Hawley. 

Empire — Elise Cage (principal), Grace 
Varborough, Jessie H. Whyte, Helen L. 
Daniels. Mary M. Shea, Ida O. Erickson. 

Las Cascadas — Shellie M. Dunn. 

Bas Obispo — Clelia D. Crespi. 

Gorgona — Grace E. McCray (principal), ' 
Effie L. Powers, Marian Patterson, Marion 
Sukeforth. 

Gatun — Charles C. Carr (principal), E. D. 
Christopherson. Alberta Hawley, Ida H. 
Bowles, Odina J. L. Frost, Cora Sessions, 
Annie E. Stone, Wenonah A. Whiting. 

Cristobal — M. Edith Anderson (principal), 
Edith Maclntyre, Jessie C Pontius, Helen 
C. Nason, Inez Cox, Lucile Annis. 

Substitutes — Georgia T. Munroe, Dora 
Nielsen. 

School Brake Schedule. 

The school brakes at the different points 
along the line will follow the schedule given 
below until further notice: 

The Balboa-Ancon brake will leave Balboa 
at 8.30 a. m. 

The Corozal-Ancon brakes will leave 
Corozal at 8 a. m. 

The Paraiso-Pedro Miguel brake will leave 
Paraiso at 8 a. m. 

The Las Cascadas-Empire brake will leave 
Las Cascadas at 8 a. m. 

The first Colon Beach-Cristobal brake will 
leave Colon Beach at 8 a. m., and the second 
Colon Beach-Cristobal brake will leave Colon 
Beach at 8.30 a. m. 

The afternoon brake service at Colon 
Beach-Cristobal will continue as last year. 



Notice of Teachers' Meetings. 

White teachers of the public schools will 
meet at the Ancon schoolbuilding on Sat- 
urday, September 30, at 8 a. m. 

Colored teachers will meet at the Ancon 
schoolbuilding on Saturday, September 30, 

at 2 p. m. 

Sailing of the "Cristobal." 

The steamship Cristobal will sail from New 
York on Wednesday, October 4. 



Hebrew Benevolent Society — Day of Atonement. 

Divine service will be conducted at the 
Sojourners' lodge room. Colon, on Sunday 
evening, October 1, at 6.15 o'clock, and on 
Monday morning, October 2, beginning at 



The Red Men's Social Club of Empire will 
give an informal dance at Kangaroo hall, 
Empire, on Saturday evening. September 30. 

Roy E. Payne was killed in the Lake Shore 
yards at Cleveland, Ohio, on August 15. 1911, 
and George Payne, his father, who is supposed 
to be on the Isthmus, is requested to com- 
municate with his family. 



36 



THE CANAL RECORD 



Vol. V., No. 5. 



FORTIFICATION WORK. 



Preparatory Work on Flamenco Island. 

The preparatory work in connection with 
the fortification of Flamenco Island in Pan- 
ama Bay has been begun, and about 60 men 
are now employed there, which number will be 
augmented as operations are increased. 
A steam shovel and a French locomotive have 
been landed, and the track is being laid for 
the shovel to begin excavating. It will dig 
its way a short distance up the steep side of 
the hill by the "switchback" method, and, 
upon reaching the desired position on the 
slope, it will excavate a bench or level, after 
which the rock mass will be dislodged in 
much the same manner as at Ancon quarry. 
The material thus loosened will be loaded 
into dump cars, four of which will be trans- 
ported by barge to Flamenco this week, and 
will be used for filling purposes. In prosecuting 
operations at the summit of the island, a 
tramway will be built to the top over which 
narrow gage dump cars can be run. 

The most important items of preparatory 
work at present, are the construction of a 
dock for unloading supplies, and the building 
of a causeway that will connect Flamenco, 
Perico, and Naos Islands, and eventually, 
all three with the mainland, by means of the 
breakwater. The causeway will be 20 feet 
wide across the top, of sufficient width for a 
railroad track and footpath, and will have an 
elevation of 20 feet above mean tide. It will 
be extended to Perico Island in nearly a 
direct line, thence along the shore of that 
island on a 10-degree curve until it reaches 
the natural sand bar crossing to Naos, which 
shows above water at low tide, and which 
will be utilized in the present work. 

The dock will be in the shape of a right 
angle, one section paralleling the beach for 
a distance of 200 feet, and the other extending 
directly out into the sea for a distance of 150 
feet. It will be faced with a concrete wall 
four feet thick, and, on the land side, will be 
filled in with selected material on a level with 
the railroad track to be laid along the shore. 
The section extending seaward parallels the 
proposed causeway, and will be filled in 
between, giving a space 110 feet wide. As the 
top of the dock will be only 15 feet above 
mean tide, and the causeway will be 20 feet, 
the floor of the dock will have a gradual slope. 
The dipper dredge Cardenas is now engaged 
in dredging out the site of the dock to bed 
rock, which is found at a depth of from 25 to 
30 feet below mean tide. After it has finished 
dredging at this point, it will be set at work 
excavating an approach channel to the dock 
for a width of 200 feet, and a depth of 25 
feet, for the use of tugs and barges loaded with 
supplies. 

The employes are housed in the old build- 
ings on Naos Island, formerly the property 
of the Pacific Mail Steamship Company, and 
alterations are being made in some of them 
to fit the new conditions. One of the larger 
buildings will be utilized for an office hotel, 
and kitchen on the lower floor, and for 
quarters for "gold" bachelor employes on the 
second floor. There are also two married 
quarters, a house for the superintendent, a 
barrack for laborers, storehouse, blacksmith 
shop, carpenter shop, etc. The machine shop, 
one of the largest buildings on the island, may 
be dismantled, its equipment having recently 
been disposed of at private sale. Quarters 
have already been provided for 60 men, and 



accommodations are being installed for 50 
more. Telephone service has not yet been 
installed, but connection with the mainland 
will probably be effected through the sub- 
marine cable to the quarantine station on 
Culebra Island. Water is obtained from the 
tanks on the island, which will shortly be 
replaced with larger ones, and a tank is being 
set up on Flamenco to supply the equipment 
there. The food supplies are conveyed to the 
Naos Island camp by the supply boat Chame 
of the Pacific Division dredging fleet. 

Porto Bello Crusher. 

A statement of the work done at the Porto 
Bello crusher, by days, for the week ending 
September 23, follows: 



$420,193.89. Of this amount, 8319,212.76 
was issued payable in the United States, 
8100,110.13 in the Canal Zone, S611 in Mar- 
tinique, and 8260 in Costa Rica. The fees 
amounted to 81,859.22, and the amount of 
orders paid and repaid was 8114,685.16. 

Postal sales during the month amounted 
to $5,977.00, and newspaper postage to $1.60. 

The revenue collections for the month were, 
as follows: 

Distillation licenses $65.70 

Bicycle and chauffeur licenses 95.00 

Motor vehicle licenses 22.00 

Taxes, licenses, etc 7.434.60 

Total $7,617.30 



Date. 






Hours 
worked. 



September 18 4.14 

September 19 | 4 . 46 

September 20 ; 3 . 58 

September 21 , 4.23 

September 22 ' 2.35 

September 23 | 4.52 



Total I 24.4 



Cubic 
Yards. 



1.054 
2,004 
1,718 
1,978 
1,300 
1,994 



10,948 



Postal Business and Canal Zone Revenues. 

The report of the Director of Posts for the 
month of August shows that there were 
17,239 money orders issued, amounting to 



Obituary. 

Henry P. Coe, a naturalized American, 
employed on barge No. 7 in the Atlantic 
Division, died at Colon Hospital on Sep- 
tember 18 of haemoglobinuric (black water) 
fever. He was born at Grand Cayman, was 
49 years of age, married, and had been on the 
Isthmus nine months. The interment took 
place in Mount Hope cemetery. 

Robert Grier, the four and one-half year 
old son of Mr. and Mrs. Wm. Grier of Culebra, 
while playing on the edge of a pool in the 
Culebra Cut on September 18. fell into the 
water and was drowned. 



LABOR FORCE AND QUARTERS IN AUGUST. 



The total force at work on the Canal and railroad on August 30 was 35.64S, as compared 
with 34.6S1 at the end of July, 1911; with 35,867 in August, 1910, and 26,519 in August, 1909. 
Canal employes numbered 28,872, and railroad employes 6,776. The number of "gold," or 
white American employes, was 4,141, compared with 1,250 in July, 1911, and with 4,445 in 
August, 1910. The force report for August 30, follows: 







SILVER EMPLOYES 


* 




*c 
Q 

S 








Artisans. 


European 
Laborers. 


West Indian 
Laborers. 


« 


Department. 




4 287 
166 
6 2 
902 
618 
7 
5 


li 

u 
14 


/ 

u 
o 

17 

i 


■f. 

C 
u 

U1 


S 
it 
U 

o 

CM 


s 


■J. 

V 

u 
o 
CM 


Z 
o 


c 
u 

c 

CM 


Z 
u 


if. 
a 

V 


i 

s 

o 

o 


B0 

z 

u 


Total 
Silver 


o 


Const'ct'n and Eng"r'ng 


231 
2 
3 

112 
2 


657 
4 

2 

15S 


2.565 

26 

3 

120 


4.047 


43 


115 


499 


4.432 


3 041 

7 
409 
95.4 


24S 
.... 

tl4 


20,l<-6 
205 

1.110 

2,58s 

620 

7 

5 


3.097 
307 
375 
202 
49 
24 
87 


23.293 
512 


Sanitation 

Quartermaster's 


5 

245 


1 


19 


1 
2 


5 
64 


1,485 

2.790 

669 


















































92 




14 


18 


350 
























6 657 


821 


2.714 


■t 20; 


44 




502 


4 501 


4 410 


69 


24,731 


4.141 


8.K72 










6.595 


13 


!_ 8 


345 


795 


2.743 


3,^82 


49 


145 


516 


4.316 


3.990 :64 


23 469 


4.197 


.'7,666 
































1 



Panama railroad force, 3.44.; Panama railroad relocation force. 2.219; Panama railroad commissaiy force 
1.116 Total 6.776 I. C C. force 28 872 Grand total. 35.648. 

*A11 wages specified are in gold, ttncludes three 5-cent emplo\es. 

The employes in the Department of Construction and Engineering on August 30, were 

distributed, as follows: 





SILVER EMPLOYES. 


* 






■6 

O 

a 
p 






Artisans. 


European 
Laborers. 


West Indian 
Laborers. 


iS 


Division. 


= 
o 


= 
u 

6 
6 

14 

13 


to 

z 

u 

cm 


DD 

a 

V 

u 

lo 

CM 


V. 

B 
V 

o 
o 

CM 


C 

u 


n 
a 

V 

u 

o 


DS 


u 
u 


Z 

u 

c 

CI 


S 

n 
u 


Hi 

V 
(J 


z 

O 


Z 
u 


Total 
Silver. 


H 

a 

e 

O 




22 

21)6 

1,869 

1.100 

1,090 

4.287 




1 


1 

30 












171 

729 

1.016 

1,001 

1,515 






196 
1 ,4011 
6.322 
7,6«4 
4,484 


171 
661 
S59 
799 
607 


367 




2 22 
13 109 
.. 25 


31S 


49 

1.297 

2,025 

676 








28 

5 5 

2,292 

196 


10 

41 

141 
56 


2.061 




333 1.108 

113 47i 
ISO 6n9 


36 
2 
5 


'93 

22 


69 
430 


7.281 
8,493 




2 

17 
IS 


73 


5.091 


Total 


231 
224 


657 2,565 


4 017 


43 


115 


499 


4.432 


3041 


248 


20 196 


3,097 


23.293 




4.2"4 


637 


2.592 


3.44S 


49 


ir.9 


514 


4.24' 


2.701 


2« 


18.995 


3 131 


22.126 



*A11 wages specified are in gold. 

QUARTERS. 

On August 30, there were 23,833 occupants of Commission quarters. Of these, 9,198 
were white Americans; 5,240 were men, 2,016 women, and 1,942 children. There were 5,532 
Europeans of the laborer clasa, of whom 4,934 were men, 250 women, 348 children. There 
wire 9,103 West Indian negroes, of whom 6,662 were men, 1,060 women, and 1,381 children. 
Included in the above were S2 Asiatics, 45 East Indians and 103 Panamanians. 



September 27, 1911. 



THE CANAL RECORD 



37 



TOWING LOCOMOTIVES. 



Method of Towing Ships Through Locks — Bids 
for Locomotives. 

Specifications and plans for the locomotives 
which will tow ships through the locks have 
been sent to the Washington office, in order 
that bids may be asked for the forty loco- 
motives that will be required for the locks at 
Gatun, Pedro Miguel, and Miraflores. The 
system of towing outlined in the specifications 
is the invention of Edward Schildhauer of the 
Canal engineering staff, and patent has been 
applied for, the Government having the right 
to use the patent without remuneration. 
Two bids will be called for, one for one loco- 
motive for test purposes, and the other for 
the remaining 39, in case the first is satis- 
factory. 

The system of towing provides for the 
passing through the locks of a ship at the 
rate of two miles an hour, the vessel being 
held steady between four lines of taut haw- 
sers. A ship will come to a full stop in the 



ship steady. The locomotives will run on 
a level, excepting where they pass from one 
lock to another, where they will climb heavy 
grades Between the lower and intermediate 
locks at Gatun, for example, there is a differ- 
ence in elevation of 29 feet 7 inches, and, in 
order to save concrete, this ascent is made 
in the shortest feasible distance. The hori- 
zontal distance from the point of tangency 
on the lower lock wall to the point of contact 
on the wall of the intermediate lock is 106 J 
feet. The vertical curve has a radius of 100 
feet, and the maximum grade is one on two. 
There will be two systems of tracks, one 
for towing, and the other for the return of the 
locomotives when not towing. The only cross- 
overs between the t acks will be at each end 
of the locks, and there will be no switches in 
the rack road. The tracks will be of the 5-foot, 
Panama railroad gage, laid with 90-pound Bes- 
semer steel rail on Carnegie steel ties, each tie 
anchored into the concrete bv a bolt on the 



permit free horizontal movement of the mem- 
bers when the locomotive is rounding a hor- 
izontal curve The windlass is joined to the 
tractors by a drawbar and trunnion which 
have the effect of a universal joint, and per- 
mit free movement of the parts when the 
locomotive is on a vertical curve. 
TRACTORS. 

The tractors will be alike in every par- 
ticular, each consisting of a four-wheel truck 
upon which are mounted a motor and a con- 
trol apparatus. They will run as rack or 
friction locomotives at the will of the operator, 
and the whole locomotive can be controlled 
from either cab. 

While towing, and on the inclines between 
the locks, the tractor will run as a rack 
locomotive Motion is communicated from 
the motor to the rack pinions by means of a 
system of gear reduction in which there are 
no clutches. There is absolutely no means 
of disconnecting this train of gears, and, as a 




ELECTRIC TCAVIXG LOCOMOTIVE. 
Side View. One tractor showing housing, one tractor and the windlass unit without housing, showing the machinery with certain parts omitted to depict the more 

dearly the working features. 



forebay of the locks where four hawsers will 
be attached to it, two forward on either side 
and two aft. At their other ends, these haw- 
sers will be attached to the windlasses of four 




■i@S 



'%*%mmwgm&m£t2B 



ELECTRIC TOWING LOCOMOTIVE. 

End View. Showing rail system with rack rail in 

center and power rail on side in open conduit. 

towing locomotives operating on the lock 
walls, two forward towing, and two aft being 
towed bv their hawsers, thu= holding the 



side farthest from the lock chamber. On the 
center wall there will be two towing tracks 
with one return track between them, and on 
each side wall a towing and return track. The 
towing tracks will have a center rack through- 
out, and the locomotive, while towing, will 
always operate on this rack. On the return 
tracks, at the incline between locks they will 
also operate on racks, but elsewhere they 
will run by friction. The racks will be of cast 
steel, so formed that lubricant will not drop 
upon the concrete, and that water will not 
be held in the interstices, this latter pre- 
caution being taken against the breeding of 
mosquitoes. The distance from center to 
center of adjoining teeth is 3.13 inches. After 
hauling the ship through the last gates, and 
into the forebay, the locomotives will coil 
their cables and return to await another ship, 
or will take hold of a vessel going in the 
opposite direction, and tow it through. 

Each locomotive v. ill consist of three parts, 
as shown by the drawings reproduced on this 
page — two tractors, and between them, a 
windlass. The windlass will not be mounted 
upon a truck, but will be supported by two 
arms extending on each side from either end 
and resting on bearings immediately over the 
rear wheels of the tractors. The ends of 
these arms will be equipped with rollers to 



result, the rack pinions are in motion only 
when the motors are. A solenoid brake, 
which closes upon a brake wheel whenever the 
current is cut off from the motors, provides 
against accident in case the current should 
be cut off while the locomotive is on one of the 
inclines. In such an event, the locomotive 
would come to a stop instantly, and be held 
there until the brake should be released. The 
rack pinions are of quill construction, and are 
so mounted upon the back axle of each truck, 
that the rack pinion will run free from the 
motor when the locomotive is on the return 
track, and traveling by friction. 

For traveling by friction, the tractors will 
be fitted with jaw clutches, which will connect 
the traction motors with the driving wheels. 
These clutches will be operated by solenoids. 
The locomotive, when operating by friction, 
will move at a rate of five miles an hour. 

The electrical equipment for each tractor 
will consist of one traction motor with control 
apparatus. The motor will have a full speed 
torque of 840 pounds at one foot radius, full 
load speed at no less than 470 revolutions per 
minute, and will be capable of developing not 
less than 75 per cent greater torque for a 
period of one minute. Alternating current 
will be used with the effect that synchronous 
speed will be maintained on all the loco- 



3& 



THE CANAL RECORD 



Vol. V., No. 5. 



motives in a tow. The motor will be 3-phase, 
induction, totally inclosed, moisture proof, 
high torque, or mill type, 25 cycles per second, 
with 220 volts between lines. The motors on 
the tractors of each locomotive will be 
operated in parallel, and controlled by resist- 
ance in the secondary circuit, accomplished 
by contactors in the primary and secondary cir- 
cuits operated by mastercontrollers, one in each 
cab. There will be not less than seven power 
points in each direction and between these 
and the braking position, there will be a 
coasting point, so that when power is turned 
off from either forward or reverse direction, 
there will be available a coasting point before 
the braking position is reached. The master 
controllers will be of the drum type, one for 
each tractor. 

Current will be collected by each tractor 
by means of a plow carrying two contact 
shoes, each operating on a separate power rail 
carried in an open conduit, one for each of 
two phases, while the third phase will be 
carried b}' both track rails. The maximum 
load that will be thrown upon the traction 
motors will occur when the locomotive is 
ascending the inclines between the locks, and 
this will be greater than the load of towing 
a ship. Inasmuch as weight is not required 
for tractive effort, the whole locomotive will 
be of light construction as possible, the esti- 
mated weight being 70,000 pounds. 

WINDLASS. 

The third part of the locomotive will be a 
windlass for hauling in or paying out the tow- 
line, and motors to drive it. The drum will be 
18 inches in diameter. A friction clutch will 
provide against it ever sustaining a pull of 
more than 25 000 pounds. Two speeds are 
provided for, one for coiling in the line under 
load at a rate of ten feet a minute, and the 
other for coiling it when not under load, at a 
rate of 200 feet per minute. Rotary switches in 
the cabs of each tractor will control the move- 
ment of the windlass. 

There will be two motors, one for operating 
the windlass under load, and one for the rapid 
coiling of the hawser. The windlass motor 
will have a full speed torque of 120 pounds 
at one foot radius, will be capable of fifty per 
cent greater torque for one minute, and will 
have a full load speed of not less than 630 
revolutions per minute. The coiling motor 
will have thirty pounds torque at one foot 
radius, be capable of exerting fifty per cent 
greater torque for one minute, and will have 
a full load speed of 630 revolutions per 
minute. These motors will be of the squirrel 
cage type, but otherwise will have the same 
classification as the motors in the tractors. 

The towing line will pass through a sheave 
in a revolving turret, which will permit it to 
rotate easily in a horizontal plane, so that the 
line load may always be directly on the 
guiding sheave. The tow line will be of plow 
steel wire, composed of six strands of 37 wires 
each, will have a hemp center, and will be 
one inch in diameter. The wires must have a 
tensile strength of not less than 225,000 
pounds per square inch, and the hawser must 
have an ultimate breaking strength of not 
less than 70,000 pounds. There will be a 
4-foot loop at the ship end, and the length of 
the line from the center of this loop to the 
drum of the windlass will be 215 feet. 

All the machinery, for both windlass and 
tractors, will be housed in a steel casing. The 
housing of the windlass will consist of a steel 



frame covered with 3-16-inch steel plate. 
The top sheeting must be capable of standing 
a strain of 85 pounds per square foot, and the 
upper side edges of the housing must be 
capable of sustaining a concentrated load of 
12,000 pounds, which may be placed upon it 
when the tow line is used to warp a vessel 
up to the lock wall, and the line is at right 
angles to the locomotive, and the chock of the 
ship is considerably below the locomotive. 



month old. The dairy is located near the insane 
asylum in the rear of the hospital grounds. The terms 
of the sale will be cash. 



The Dennis Relief Fund. 

Supplementing the statement of the fund 
for the relief of Mrs. L. R. Dennis, published 
in The Canal Record of September 6, the 
committee in charge of the fund on the Isth- 
mus wishes to announce to the many sub- 
scribers that letters and statements have been 
received from various persons in Washington 
denying in whole the newspaper story to the 
effect that Mrs. Dennis and her children 
arrived in that city in a destitute condition. 
A letter from Mrs. Dennis states that she had 
cash in Tier pocket, and a money order for $60 
available upon her arrival at Washington, and 
that she never stated to any one that she 
was destitute, or in any danger of want. 



Benefit for the Late Captain Hammond. 

The committee that has in charge the 
subscription for the benefit of the widow of 
the late Captain Edwin Hammond of the 
Panama railroad steamship line, announces 
that the list will be closed on September 30, 
and a draft for the amount collected will be 
sent to Mrs. Hammond. No money will be 
received after that date. Members of the 
committee are requested to send their lists 
and collections to Mr. W. G. Ross, Empire, 
C. Z., not later than September 30. 



Civil Service Examinations. 

Examination will be held, probably on 
October 29, for stenographer and typewriter 
in the Isthmian Canal and Philippine serv- 
ices, and for typewriter in the Isthmian Canal 
service. Applications therefor will be received 
until October 25. The kind of examination 
desired should be stated in requesting i for- 
mation in regard to the above. 

In answer to the question in application 
forms as to bona fide residence, applicants are 
required to show such residence up to the 
date of application. It is to be noted that 
bona fide residence does not require continu- 
ous bodily presence, but refers to the place 
at which an applicant, if a voter, is legally 
entitled to vote. 

John K. Baxter, Secretary. 
Isthmian Civil Service Board. 
Culebra, C. Z., September 29, 1911. 



Misdirected Letters. 
Ancon, C. Z., September 27, 1911. 
The following insufficiently addressed letters, origi- 
nating in the United States and its possessions, have 
been received in the office of the Director of Posts, and 
may be secured upon request of the addressee: 



Alveralo, Mrs. Falona 
Fitzgerald, Emmett 
Gauthier, A. 
Gorman, Miss Mary 
Gorman, Will E. 
Hahn, Charlie F. 
Hardt, Henry O. 
Hickey, John 
Hoffman, John, Jr. 
Hoffman. Warren E. 
James, Jos. H. 
Kesner, C. M. 



McDonald, Mrs. Iris 
Miller, J. B. 
Palmer. R. M. 
Parks. Fred M. 
Peters, F. C. 
Smith, Fred C. 
Suart, H. V. 
Titus, W. L. (pkg.) 
Torres, Leonidas 
Von Deleigh, Mrs. Alice 
Wentsler. H. E. 



Family Quarters. 

Applications for married quarters were on file on 
September 1, as follows: 



District. 


List 
No 1. 


List 
No. 2. 




1 (1) 


34 (1) 
3 (1) 
31 (7) 
19 (1) 
37 (1) 
102 










1 






2 
2 




25 (1) 
63 (33) 






2 
2 
2 
3 


126(44) 




73 (32) 




22 (4) 




42(11) 
7 (3) 


Porto Bello 






2 






7 (2) 






Total 


15 


593(141) 





Note — The figures in parenthesis show the number 
of applicants already occupying regular or nonhouse- 
keeping family quarters at stations other than those 
at which applications are filed. 



Rainfall from September 1 to 23, 1911, Inclusive. 



Stations. 



Pacific Section 

Ancon 

[j Balboa 

*Mira (lores . . . . 
£ Pedro Miguel. . 

Rio Grande. . . . 
Central Section — 

Culebra 

*Camacho 

Empire 

Gamboa 

*Juan Mina . . . 

Alhajucla 

*E1 Vigia 

*Gorgona 

San Pablo 

Tabernilla 

Bohio 

*Monte Lirio . . 
Atlantic Section — ■ 

Gatun 

*Brazos Brook . 

Cristobal 

Porto Bello. . .. 



c 




E >• 

e' 

a o 

s 





Ins. 




2.22 


22 


2.01 


22 


1.05 


2 


.92 


2 


.77 


8 


.78 


3 


.70 


8 


.64 


5 


.63 


5 


.91 


5 


1.11 


7 


1.35 


12 


.95 


22 


.45 


22 


.63 


17 


1.27 


17 


2.00 


1 


.42 


19 


.85 


19 


1.54 


1 


2.73 


17 ■ 



Ins. 
5.13 
6.19 
5.32 
4.48 
3.79 

3.50 

4.01 
3.64 
3.55 
4.74 
3.80 
4.52 
5.02 
2.62 
2.63 
4.00 
7.62 

2.36 

5.59 

6.39 

tl0.95 



*Standard rain gage — readings at 5 p. m. daily. 
Automatic rain gage at unstarred stations — values 
midnight to midnight. 1"To 5 p. m., September 22. 



Stages of the Chagres 

Maximum heights of the Chagres River for the week 
ending midnight, Saturday, September 23. 1911. All 
heights are in feet above mean sea level. 







Station. 






Day and Date. 


Vigia. 


"iD 

3 
JG 

3 


o 

E 
w 
O 


6 

IE 
o 

n 


c . 

I-* 


Sun., Sept, 17. . 
Mon., Sept. IS. 
Tues., Sept. 19. 
Wed., Sept. 20. 
Thurs., Sept. 21 
Fri., Sept. 22... 
Sat., Sept. 23. . 


126. S 
131.3 
129.5 
127.3 
126.5 
129.4 
128.7 


93. 1 
96.3 
96.1 
93.7 
93.1 
95.2 
95.0 


45.8 
48.7 
49.3 
46.3 
46.2 
47.9 
48.0 


13.7 
13.9 
14.7 
14.3 
14.4 
14.4 
14.8 


13.6 
13.8 
14.2 
14.3 
14.3 
14.3 
14.4 


Height of low 
water 


125.0 


92.0 44.0 







Tide Table. 

The following table shows the time of high and low 
tides at Panama for the week ending October 4, 1911 
(75th meridian time): 



Auction Sale of Calves. 
On Saturday, October 7. 1911, at 10 a. m., there will 
be sold at public sale to the highest bidder at the 
Ancon Hospital dairy, three or four calves, about one 



Date. 


Low. 


High. 


Low. 


High. 


Low. 




A.M. 


A.M. 


P.M. 


P.M. 


P.M. 


September 28 . . . 


1.10 


7.05 


1.30 


7.35 




September 29 . . . 


1.50 


7.45 


2.20 


8.15 




September 30 . . . 


2.40 


8.25 


3.10 


9.08 




October 1 


3.35 


9.40 


3.55 


10.25 




October 2 


4.50 


10.50 
1' M. 


5.25 


11.50 




October 3 ..... . 


6 05 


12.10 
A.M. 


6.30 

A.M. 
















12.52 


7.03 


1.10 


7.20 







September 17, 1911. 



THE CANAL RECORD 



39 



COMMISSION CLUBHOUSES. 



Activities of the Young Men's Christian Associ- 
ation. 

The schedule of moving picture entertainments for 
the week of October 2 to 7, follows: Monday, Culebra; 
Tuesday, Corozal; Wednesday. Empire; Thursday, 
Gorgona; Friday, Gatun; Saturday, Cristobal. 

CULEBRA. 

On Monday night, an exhibition in pool and billiards 
was given by J. L. Malone, the pool expert. In billiards, 
he played Messrs. Dubois and Thomson, winning by a 
scoreof 158 to 116. In pool, he played Messrs. Fleisch- 
man and Stevens, winning by a score of 77 to 58. Alter 
the games, Malone gave an exhibition of fancy shots. 

On Tuesday night, the quartermaster's team 
defeated the "All stars" in volleyball, winning three 
games. 

At the motion picture entertainment on Friday 
night. Mr. Weston from Cristobal furnished vocal and 
instrumental music. 

On Saturday night, the Empire bowling team took 
three games from Culebra on the home alleys. Follow ing 
are the scores: 

Culebra. Empire. 

Sickler 113 129 134 Pinney 161 173 167 

Mcllvaine.. 124 Giavelli . . . . 185 l"! 16S 

Fox 124 153 Anderson... 175 1S4 154 

Fleischman. 163 164 138 Davis 143 114 154 

Dougherty. 176 180 181 Parkis.... 161 156 183 
Baumer 117 155 141 



S25 818 826 



Total 693 752 747 

GORGON A. 

On Monday night, September 18, the gymnastic 
class, after the regular gymnasium work, had a group 
picture taken in the gymnasium. About twenty men 
were present. These pictures will be on sale the latter 
part of this week. In the hygiene class, the subject of 
"Diet" was discussed. 

Two hundred and fifty people witnessed the moving 
picture show on Wednesday night. September 20. The 
next will be on Saturday night, September 30. 

At the membership "smoker" on Saturday night. 
September 23, a program was rendered, consisting of 
orchestral music; songs by Messrs. Kelly, Ringger, 
Kramer, Robitoy, and Dr. Funk; monologues by 
marines from Camp Elliott; ballad, Mr. Gardner; 
dancing, Mr. Zelinski; club swinging, Mr. Kramer* 
burlesque, Messrs. Patterson and Emery; chalk 
sketching, Mr. Shaw; songs, quartet from Camp 
Elliott. The Gorgona indoor baseball team was 
presented with the Isthmian championship trophy for 
the season 1910-11, A. B. Dickson making the presen- 
tation. The membership contest was closed with Perry's 
team in the lead. 

In the bowling at Gorgona on Saturday night. 
September 23. Gorgona took three games from Cristo- 
bal, the score being, as follows: 

1st game. 2d game. 3d game. 

Cristobal 763 693 682 

Gorgona 765 728 699 

One hundred and twenty-five people attended the 
monthly song service held last Sunday evening. The 
Rev. Mr. Compton of Panama delivered the address; 
Mr. Thos. Gardner sang a solo, and Mrs. R. C- Shady 
played the piano. 

EMPIRE. 

The following scores of 200, or over, were bowled 
during the past week: Tenpins — Pinnery, 200, 213, 202; 
Mitchell. 224; Snyder, 202; Davis. 216; Spinks. 202; 
Pearson, 200; Parkis, 244, 203, 200, 217. Duckpins— 
Grund. 112; Reiman, 105. 

The league games bowled on Empire alleys on Sat- 
urday night. September 23, resulted in Empire winning 
two out of three games from Culebra. Following are 
the scores: 

Empire. Culebra. 

Gustavson.. 190 164 146 Herrington.. 134 158 140 
Spinks... ISO 167 212 Warner... 136 157 132 
Gorham.... 174 142 173 Driscoll . . . 156 117 151 
Pearson. .. 160 169 157 Mengel. . 142 203 143 

Huson 146 144 Case 185 174 168 

Drake 147 



Total 850 786 835 753 809 734 

The regular meeting of the literary and debating 



society will be held on Friday night, September 29, 
subject "What is socialism?"; leader, Mr. Morrison of 
Cristobal. 

A pool and billiard tournament will be started on 
October 2, and all those interested are requested to 
leave their names at the desk. 

On Sunday evening, October 1, there will be an 
informal song service at 8.30 o'clock. 

GATUN. 

On Wednesday night, September 20, Louis De- 
Poorter. champion poo! player of the Isthmus, played 
and defeated J. L. Malone, the pool expert. The score 
was 150 to 136. Mr. DePoorter also made the highest 
run of 19 balls. Mr. Malone's high run being 14 balls. 
Following the pool match, a "smoker" was held in the 
hall, at which there were recitations, acrobatic work, 
chalk cartoons, and orchestra music. Ice cream, punch, 
and sandwiches were served. Mr. Malone concluded 
the evening's entertainment with an exhibition of fancy 
pool and billiard shots. 

Until further notice. Mr. Jess Hopkins will conduct 
the physical classes on Tuesday and Thursday evenings, 
with basketball practice on Tuesday evening, following 
the gymnasium class. 

There will be a match game of basketball between 
the Pacifies and the Atlantics of the McClintic- 
Marshall Company on Saturday evening, September 30. 
E. M. Cooper will captain the Pacifies, and J. F. 
Minotti the Atlantics. 

Forty-five new books were placed on the library 
shelves recently. Among them are a large Webster's 
unabridged dictionary, and a Rand-McNally atlas of 
the world. Another order will be sent to the States 
this week. 

The Gatun bowling team defeated the Camp Elliott 
team on Saturday night, winning three games. Scores 
were, as follows: 

Camp Elliott 701 764 619 

Gatun 784 796 757 

At Camp Elliott, the Gatun team won two out of 
three games. Scores, as follows: 

Camp Elliott 750 753 746 

Gatun 737 782 779 

CRISTOBAI . 

An audience of 230 witnessed the match games and 
fancy shots in pool, and billiards, on Friday evening, 
September 27, when J. L. Malone met Messrs. Weh- 
meier and Davis in pool, Mr. Malone winning by the 
score of 75 to 53. Mr. Mosher was matched with Mr. 
Malone in billiards, with a handicap of 50 points in a 
200-point game, and the latter won by the score of 
200 to 105. He also gave an exhibition of fancy shots. 

A motion picture entertainment will be given on 
Friday night, September 29; members free; other 
adults 25 cents; children 15 cents. Mr. Weston will 
furnish special vocal music, and Mr. Glick will play the 
piano. 

The medals won by the Cristobal members in the 
recent Isthmian duckpin league tournament will be 
presented at the "smoker" on Thursday night, Sep- 
tember 28. 

The Camp Elliott bowling team will bowl three 
tournament games at Cristobal on Saturday night, 
September 30, and a team from Cristobal will also 
bowl at Camp Elliott the same evening. 

An open program will be presented on Wednesday 
evening, October 4, by the literary and debating club. 
The entertainment will be a political rally, at which 
presidential candidates of the various parties will be 
nominated. 

The bowling team from Gorgona played the Cristobal 
team on Saturday night, losing three games to Cris- 
tobal. Following are the scores: 

Gorgona. Cristobal. 

Otis 166 143 151 Barrett... 187 168 184 

Sims. 162 171 161 Thomas.. 143 190 146 

Arnold. 158 155 136 T. Burns. 177 165 186 

A.Burns. ..110 156 124 Collins... 171 164 158 
Haldeman 198 191 122 Louch... 169 186 193 

Total . . 794 816 694 847 *73 867 



OFFICIAL CIRCULARS. 



Lost — Between Colon and Gorgona on Sunday, 
September 17, a Masonic watch charm in the shape of 
a locket. Finder please return to John Gray, care of 
I. C. C Band. Cristobal. 



CLASSIFIED EXPENDITURES. 



A statement of classified expenditures of the Isthmian Canal Commission to July 31, fol- 
lows : 



Periods. 



1 Department 
of Civil ' 
Administration 



Department 

of 

Law 



Department 

of 
Sanitation. 



i Department of 
I Construction 
and Fngineering 



To June 30. 1909 
Fiscal year. 1910 
Fiscal vear. I'M L 
July, 1911 

Total 



3.427.090.29 

709,351.37 

^755.079.44 

72.S95.22 



2,527.35 



9.673.539.28 

1.803.040.95 

1,717,792.62 

137.635.83 



69.622,561.42 
26,300,167.05 
27.463,401.31 

2.084. 530.55 




Total. 



78,022,606.10 

2,863.088.83 

3.112.334 60 

317.751.38 



160.745,797.09 

31,675.648.20 

33,048.607.97 

2,615.340.33 



Captain of the Port. 
Culebra, C. Z., September 22. 1911. 
Circular No. 410: 

Mr. J. St. C. Hunt is hereby appointed Captain of 
the Port of Ancon, and Mr. S. Layland is appointed 
Captain of the Port of Cristobal. 

Geo. W. Goethals, Chairman. 



Checking and Delivering of Cement. 

Culebra, C. Z., September 25. 1911. 
Circular No. 335-a*: 

Circular No. 335, dated June 10, 1910, providing 
method for checking and delivering cement, is hereby 
modified, as follows: 

1. Hereafter, cement for the Atlantic Division shall 
be checked in the ship's hold by checkers for the 
Atlantic Division and Panama Railroad. 

2. The Panama railroad shall receive credit for all 
overages shown. The Depot Quartermaster shall keep 
a running account of charges for shortages, against 
which he can credit overages, if such obtain, and on 
June 30, and on December 31. of each year, he shall 
render an account pertaining to the six months 
immediately preceding. 

3. The records of all checks of cement delivered to 
the Atlantic and Pacific Divisions shall be sent direct 
to the Panama railroad. Set cement pertaining to each 
cargo shall be surveyed by the Surveying Officer im- 
mediately after discharge of cargo. The complete 
outturn of the cargo, as attested by the two divisions 
and the Surveying Officer, and accepted by the Panama 
railroad, shall then be forwarded to the Depot Quarter- 
master, who will accomplish bills of lading for the 
Commission on the data submitted. 

Geo. W. Goethals. 
Chairman and Chief Engineer . 



Chief Clerk, Atlantic Division. 

Gatun, C Z.. September 22, 1911. 
To all Concerned; 

Effective this date, Mr. Ben Jenkins is appointed 
Chief Clerk of the Atlantic Division, vice Mr. R. M. 
Sands, resigned. 

Wm. L. Sibert, Division Engineer. 



Rates for Water at Colon and Cristobal. 

Panama Railroad Company, 
Office of General Superintendent. 

Colon, R. P.. September 22, 1911. 
Notice dated July 29. 1911, quoting rates on water 
supplied vessels at Colon and Cristobal , is hereby 
cancelled. 

Effective at once, the following rates will apply: 

500 gallons, or less S2 . 50 

501 to 1.000 qallons 3.00 

1.001 to 1,500 gallons 3.50 

1,501 to 2.000 gallons 4.00 

All over 2,000 gallons. SI for each additional 1.000 
gallons. 

F. Mears, Acting General Superintendent. 



4.964.416.32 



J5 13.332,008.68 125.470.660.33 84.315.780.91 228,085.393.59 



Band Concert. 

A concert will be given by the Isthmian Canal Com- 
mission Band at Las Cascadas. C. Z., on Sunday, 
October 1, 1911. at 6 p. m. The program follows: 

1. March — Ideal Reeves 

2. Selection — The Spring, Maid Reinhardt 

3. Romance — -4 Tale of Two Hearts Roberts 

4. Overture — Jolly Robbers Surre 

5. Flower song — Hearts and Flowers Tobani 

6. Waltz— Casino Tanze Gung'l 

7. (a) Two step — Billy Kendis 

(b) — Chicken Reel Daly 

S. Medley selection — Rossiler's Popular Songs. . Alford 
9. Characteristic Morceau — On Tiptoe ... . Hosmer 

10, March — Arbitrator Bagley 

Charles E. Jennings. Musical Dt>. 
The next concert will be given at the Hotel Tivoli. 
Ancon, C. Z.. on October S. at 7.30 p. m. 

The following vessels arrived at. or departed from 
the port of Balboa during the week ending Septem- 
ber 23: 

Arrivals — September 17, Manlaro, from Callao; 
September 18, Guatemala, from Callao; September 20, 
City of Sidney, from San Francisco; Manavi, from 
Buenaventura; September 21. Chile, from Guayaquil; 
September 22. Tampico, from San Francisco. 

Departures — September 18, Peru, to Guayaquil; 
Paehitea, to Callao; September 19,<?h/*o. to Guayaquil; 
September 21, Limari, to Valparaiso; September 23, 
Manlaro, to Callao. 

Lost — On Sunday September 17, either at Empire 
station, or on train to Colon, ribbon watch fob with 
monogrammed locket set with a diamond — monogram 
"G. C." Finder return to Geo. Clark, Empire, C. Z., 
and receive reward. 



40 



THE CANAL RECORD 



Vol. V., No. 5. 



COMMISSARY DEPARTMENT. 

The commissaries are open during the following 
hours: 

Cristobal, 8 a. m. to 12.30 p. m., and 2 to 7 p. m. 
Culebra, 8 a. m. to 1 p. m., and 3 to 7 p. m. 

Balboa, 8 a. m. to 12.30 p. m., and 2.30 to 7 p. m. 
Ancon. 8 a. m. to 1 p. m., and 3 to 6 p. m. 
All others, 8 a. m. to 1 p. m., and 3 to 7 p. m. 

Retail prices of cold storage provisions for the week 
beginning September 21. 

fresh meats. Price. 

Mutton — Stewing, per pound . . . .' 6 

Shoulder, neck trimmed off, (4 pounds 

and over) , per pound 9 

Entire forequarter (not trimmed), 10 

pounds and over, per pound 8 

Leg (8 to 10 pounds), per pound 17 

Cutlets, per pound 18 

Short cut chops, per pound 20 

Lamb — Stewing, per pound 6 

Entire forequarter, neck trimmed off, 

per pound ° 

Leg (5 to 8 pounds) , per pound 20 

Chops, per pound 24 

Cutlets, per pound 24 

Veal — Stewing, per pound 10 

Shoulder, for roasting (not under 4 

pounds), per pound 12$ 

Chops, shoulder, per pound 16 

Chops, per pound 24 

Loin, for roasting, per pound 24 

Cutlets, per pound 28 

Pork — Loin chops or roast, per pound 18 

Beef — Suet, per pound 2 

Soup, per pound 5 

Stew, per pound 8 

Corned. No. 1, per pound 12 

Corned, No. 2, per pound 10 

Chuck roast (3 pounds and over), per 

pound 12 

Pot roast, per pound 12$ 

Rib roast, second cut (not under 3i 

pounds), per pound 16 

Rib roast, first cut (not under 3 pounds), 

per pound 18 

Sirloin roast , per pound 19 

Rump roast, per pound 19 

Porterhouse roast, per pound 20 

Steak, chuck, per pound 12$ 

Round, per pound 13 

Rib, per pound 18 

Sirloin, per pound 19 

Rump, per pound 19 

Porterhouse (not less than Ik 

pounds), per pound 20 

Tenderloin (Western), per pound. 24 

MISCELLANEOUS. 

Caviare. Russian, per tin 47, 89 

Livers — Beef, per pound 7 

Calf, each 60 

Half, each 30 

Steak. Hamburger, pkg 13 

Sausage — Bologna, per pound 10 

Frankfurter, per pound 12 

Lieberwurst, per pound 10 

Devonshire Farm 17 

Sweetbread — Veal, per pound 1 . 20 

Beef, per pound 25 

Eggs, fresh, dozen t29 

one-half dozen only 15 

Bluefish. fresh, per pound 14 

11 ilibut, fresh, per pound 15 

Sh ids. fresh, each 70 

Shad roes, fresh, per pair 35 

POULTRY AND GAME. 

Chickens — Fancy roasting, milk fed, large, each 1.25 

Fancy roasting, milk fed. med., each 1.00 
Fancy roasting, corn fed, about 4£ 

pounds, each 90 

Fowls, each 60, 70, 80. 90, 1 . 00 

Ducks. Western, about 4£ pounds, each 1.00 

Broilers, milk fed, each 60 

corn fed, each 55 

Turkeys, per pound 26 

Squabs, each 35 

Capons, each 2.10 

Fryers, corn fed, each 60 

Partridges, each 50 

Grouse, each 50 

CURED AND PICKLED MEATS. 

Ham — German, Westphalia, per pound 36 

Sugar cured, per pound f20 

Sliced, per pound 1"22 

Half, for boiling, per pound t2l 

Boiled, per pound 26 

Hocks, per pound 18 

Todd's Smithfield Virginia, per pound.. 30 

Bacon — Breakfast, whole piece, per pound t23 

Breakfast, sliced, per pound J24 

Pork, salt family, per pound 13 

Ox tongues, each 1 , 00 

Pigs' feet, per pound 9 

Tongues, per pound 18 

Sliced bacon in 1 -pound tins, per tin 30 

In 1-pound jars, per jar 30 

DAIRY PRODUCTS. 

Butter — Creamery special, per pound 32 

Cheese — Roquefort, per pound 38 

Philadelphia cream, cake IS 

Young America, per pound IS 

Swiss, per pound 26 

Edam, each 1.00 



Price. 

Neufchatel, cake 6 

Gouda. per pound 34 

Milk (Certified), per bottle **25 

Buttermilk, bottle **15 

Fer-mil-lac, bottle **2S 

Ice cream, quart 125 

j-gallon 150 

VEGETABLES AND FRUITS. 

Beets, per pound 3 

Celery, per head 6 

Cabbage, per pound "K 

Cucumbers, per pound 3 

Carrots, pei pound 3 

Cauliflower, per pound 12 

Lettuce, per pound 12 

Onions, per pound 3 J 

Potatoes, white, per pound 4 

sweet, per pound 2 

Pears, alligator, each 6 

Romaine, per pound 12 

Turnips, per pound 3 

Tomatoes, per pound 4 

Yams, per pound 3 

Cantaloupes, each 8 

Grapes, assorted , per pound 7 

Grapes, California Malaga, per pound 10 

Lemons, dozen 24 

Limes, per 100 80 

Oranges, California, per dozen *36 

Pears, per pound 7 

Peaches, pound 6 

Plums, per pound 7 

Watermelons, each 45 

♦Indicates reduction from last list. 
♦♦Indicates 5 cents allowed for return of bottle, 
tlndicates advance on last list. 

ISo'd only from commissaries; no orders taken for 
delivery 

Supplies for Canal Work. 

The following steamers, with supplies for the Isth- 
mian Canal Commission, arrived at the ports of Cris- 
tobal and Colon during the two weeks ending Septem- 
ber 23: 

Prinz Sigismund, September 10, from New York, 
with 10 cases harness oil and 40 cases black paint for 
stock. 

Axminster, S?ptember II, from Baltimore, with 
1,700 kegs spikes, 2,062 pieces drill casing, 625 bundles 
steel bars, 20.325 cases dynamite, 8 cases paint, 137 
kegs bolts. 1,546 pieces steel rail, 358 barrels sulphate 
alumina, 50 barrels lump alum, for stock. 

Panama, September 11, from New York, with 132 
pieces white oak lumber. 18 pieces steel plates, 500 kegs 
track spikes, 11 pieces steel bars, 12 bundles wicker 
baskets, 4' barrels varnish, 12 cases paint, 3i cases 
paper, 7 cases spelter, 6 cases range parts, for stock; 
20 cases insulating tape, 1,000 bundles bolts, 12 bags 
bolts, 13 cases incandescent lamps, for Mechanical 
Division; and a miscellaneous cargo, the whole con- 
sisting of 2,080 packages, weighing 125 tons. 

Oruba, September 10. from New York, with 12 cases 
electrical material for stock. 

Abangarez, September 14, from New Orleans, with 
32 bundles washers for Pacific Division; 23 bundles 
doors for Panama Railroad Company; 7 cases scythe 
stones. 1.293 bales hay, 70 pieces white oak lumber, 
3,912 pieces siding, 4,581 pieces yellow pine lumber, 
for stock; 5,152 pieces car siding, 3,036 pieces car roofing, 
for Mechanical Division. 

Metapan, September 14, from New York, with 26 
bales air brake hose. 60 pieces switches, 125 pieces 
frogs, 50 bundles steel tubes, 6 cases rubber hose, for 
stock. 

Ancon, September 16, from New York, with 10 
barrels electrical material for Atlantic Division; 13 
barrels fire brick, 13 barrels ferro manganese. 80 barrels 
copper ingots, for Mechanical Division; 29 pieces steel 
castings for Central Division; 25 kegs nuts. 30 bales 
wool waste. 25 cases ink, for stock; 124,960 bags cement 
for Atlantic and Pacific Divisions. 

Advance, September 18, from New York, with 150 
cases ivory soap, 8 crates mop handles, 833 bundles 
corrugated roofing, 20 pieces switches, 107 cases salt 
water soap, 7 cases ticking, 34 barrels rosin. 85 kegs 
spikes, 10 bales rubber hose, 19 cases envelopes, 30 
cases rough castings, 10 cases putty, 50 cases varnish, 
for stock; 14 cases books, 10 cases school supplies, for 
Department of Civil Administration; 28 cases caskets, 
10 cases drugs, for Sanitary Department; and a 
miscellaneous cargo, the whole consisting of 1,505 
packages, weighing 165 tons. 

Zacapa, September 21, from New York, with 32 
cases electrical material for Atlantic Division; 40 cases 
brake shoes for Mechanical Division; 202 pieces steel 
beams for stock. 

Atenas, September 21, from New Orleans, with 704 
pieces yellow pine lumber, 51 pieces white oak lumber. 
314 bundles flooring, for stock; 107 pieces ties for 
P. I. ific Division; 12 cases castings, 387 tons pig iron, 
for Mechanical Division; 17 cases school supplies for 
Department of Civil Administration. 

Prinz Eitel Friedrich, September 23, from New York, 
with 500 bundles wire for stock; 13 cases desks. 22 cases 
desk fittings, for Department of Civil Administration. 



MOVEMENT OF OCEAN VESSELS. 



The following is a list of the sailings of the Panama 
Railroad Steamship Company; of the Royal Mail 
Steam Packet Company; of the Hamburg-American 
Line, and of the United Fruit Company's Line; the 
Panama Railroad Company's dates being subject to 
change. 

NEW YORK TO CRISTOBAL. 

Panama P. R. R. Friday Sept. 29 

Cristobal P. R. R .Wednesday.Oct. 4 

Advance P. R. R .Thursday.. Oct. 5 

Colon P. R. R.Thursday.. Oct. 12 

Allianca P. R. R . WednesdayOct. 18 

Panama P. R. R .Tuesday.. .Oct. 24 

Advance P. R. R . Monday . . . Oct. 30 

CRISTOBAL TO NEW YORK. 

Ancon P. R, R . Thursday. . Sept. 28 

Colon P. R. R.Saturday.. Sept. 30 

Panama P. R. R . Thursday. . Oct. 1 2 

Advance P. R. R.. Tuesday. . .Oct. 17 

Colon P. R. R.Tuesday... Oct. 24 

Allianca P. R. R . Monday. .. Oct. 30 

Panama P. R. R.Sunday.. . .Nov. 5 

Advance P. R. R . Saturday . . Nov. 1 1 

NEW YORK TO COLON. 

Almirante U. F. C. Thursday.. Sept. 21 

Prinz August Wilhelm . . . H.-A Saturday . . Sept. 23 

Santa Marta U. F. C. Thursday.. Sept. 28 

Prinz Sigismund H.-A Friday . . . .Sept. 29 

Clyde R. M.. . .Saturday . .Sept. 30 

Metapan U. F. C. .Thursday.. Oct. 5 

Prinz Joachim H.-A. . . .Saturday. .Oct. 7 

Zacapa U. F. C. Thursday.. Oct. 12 

Prinz Eitel Friedrich H.-A Friday Oct. 13 

Atrato R. M... .Saturday. .Oct. 14 

Almirante U. F. C. Thursday.. Oct. 19 

Prina August Wilhelm H.-A Saturday. .Oct. 21 

Santa Marta U. F. C Thursday.. Oct. 26 

Prinz Sigismund H.-A.. . .Friday. . . .Oct. 27 

Thames R. M Saturday. .Oct. 28 

Metapan U. F. C. Thursday.. Nov. 2 

COLON TO NEW YORK. 

Zacapa U. F. C .Thursday. .Sept. 28 

Prinz Eitel Friedrich H.-A. . . . Saturday . . Sept. 30 

Atrato R. M . . .Tuesday.. .Oct. 3 

Almirante U. F. C. Thursday.. Oct. 5 

Prinz August Wilhelm . . .H.-A. . . .Tuesday.. .Oct. 10 

Santa Marta U. F. C. .Thursday.. Oct. 12 

Prinz Sigismund H.-A. . . . Saturday. .Oct. 14 

Thames R. M... .Tuesday.. .Oct. 17 

Metapan U. F. C Thursday. .Oct. 19 

Prinz Joachim H.-A Tuesday.. .Oct. 24 

Zacapa U. F. C Thursday.. Oct. 26 

Prinz Eitel Friedrich H.-A Saturday . .Oct. 28 

Trent R. M . . .Tuesday.. .Oct. 31 

Almirante U. F. C . Thursday. . Nov. 2 

Prinz August Wilhelm H.-A. . . . Tuesday. . . Nov. 7 

NEW ORLEANS TO COLON. 

Turrialba U. F. C. Saturday. .Sept. 23 

Heredia U. F. C.Wednesday Sept. 27 

Abangarez U. F. C. Saturday . .Sept. 30 

Cartago U. F. C. . WednesdayOct. 4 

Atenas U. F. C. . Saturday . . Oct. 7 

Parismina U. F. C. Wednesday.Oct. 11 

Turrialba U. F. C. Saturday. .Oct. 14 

Heredia U- F. C Wednesday.Oct. 18 

Abangarez U. F. C. Saturday ...Oct. 21 

Cartago U. F. C. Wednesday.Oct. 25 

Atenas U F. C. Saturday. ..Oct. 28 

Parismina U. F. C.Wednesday.Nov. 1 

COLON TO NEW ORLEANS. 

Parismina U. F. C. Thursday.. Sept. 28 

Atenas U. F. C. Thursday.. Sept. 28 

Heredia U. F. C. Thursday. .Oct. 5 

Turrialba U. F. C. Thursday.. Oct. 5 

Cartago U. F. C. Thursday.. Oct. 12 

Abangarez U. F. C. Thursday.. Oct. 12 

Parismina U. F. C. Thursday.. Oct. 19 

Atenas U. F. C. Thursday.. Oct. 19 

Heredia U. F. C. Thursday.. Oct. 26 

Turrialba U. F. C. Thursday. . Oct. 26 

Hamburg-American steamers leave Colon for New 
York via Kingston at 10 a. m. on sailing dates. The 
Prinz August Wilhelm and Prinz Joachim call at 
Santiago de Cuba, on both outward and homeward 
voyages. 

Royal Mail steamers leave for New York on alter- 
nate Tuesdays, at 10 a. ra.; for Southampton on alter- 
nate Tuesdays at 10 a. m. 

United Fruit Company's ships for New Orleans 
direct, leave on Thursdays at 3 p. m.; ships for New 
Orleans in the coastwise service on Thursdays at 4 p. m. ; 
ships for New York via Kingston on Thursdays at 11 
a. m.; for Bocas del Toro on Mondays at 6 p. m. 

The Leyland line steamer Louisinian sails for New 
Orleans direct on or about September 28. 



CANAL 




RECORD 



Volume V. 



ANCON, CANAL ZONE, WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 4, 1911. 



No. 6. 



The Canal Record 

Published weekly under the authority and supervision of 
the Isthmian Canal Commission. 



The Canal Record is issued free of charge, one copy 
each, to all employes of the Commission and Panama 
Railroad Company whose names are on the gold roll. 
Extra copies and back numbers can be obtained from the 
news stands of the Panama Railroad Company for five 
cents each. 

Address all Communications 

THE CANAL RECORD, 

Ancon, Canal Zone, 

Isthmus of Panama. 

No communication, either for publication or requesting 
information, will receive attention unless signed with the 
full name and address of the writer. 



NOTES OF PROGRESS. 



Excavation in Culebra Cut. 

The excavation in the Central Division 
for the month of September, aggregated 1,- 
361,445 cubic yards, of which 1,340,173 cubic 
yards were taken from the Culebra section, 
known as Culebra Cut. This is the highest 
September record in the Culebra section 
since the commencement of operations on the 
Isthmus by the United States. 



Lights for the Pacific Entrance 

A requisition has been made on the Wash- 
ington office for two light apparatuses for the 
towers forming range 9-11 at the southeast 
end of the tangent, extending from Balboa 
to Miraflores in the Pacific entrance to 
the Canal. The towers are nearing com- 
pletion. It is proposed to install lights in 
which acetylene gas is absorbed under press- 
ure by acetone, the acetone itself being 
soaked up by a mechanical absorbent to pre- 
vent the escape of a bubble of gas under pres- 
sure, an occurrence possible if the acetone is in 
the reservoir in its liquid state. Buoys with 
this type of light are used satisfactorily both 
in Europe and in the United States. One of 
these lights will be equipped with the Dalen 
sun valve in order to see whether or not the 
valve would be economical under the night 
and day conditions existing on the Canal 
Zone. Locomotive headlights in stock on the 
Isthmus will be used with the gas burners. 
Tentatively the characteristics for the front 
and rear lights will be — front light, 0.3 
seconds light, 7 seconds dark; rear light. 
1.0 seconds light, 1.0 seconds dark. The tem- 
porary equipment in range 9-11 will give a 
service capacity of six months for each light. 



Excavation Between Mindi and Gatun. 

The suction dredge Sandpiper began ex- 
cavating on September 30, in the Canal prism 
between Mindi hills and Gatun locks, where 
it is estimated that four and three-quarter 
million yards of material must be removed. 
At present, the dredge will excavate towards 
the steam shovel pit at Mindi. It is expected 



that the dry excavation at Mindi will be com- 
pleted about January 1, 1912, then the suction 
dredge will break into the pit from the south- 
ward, and the ladder and dipper dredges at 
work in the Atlantic entrance will enter it 
from the north. Before that time the 18-inch 
suction dredge, now excavating sand at 
Xombre de Dios, will be towed to Gatun and 
set at work with the Sandpiper in this section 
of the Canal. All the material excepting a 
small hill just south of Mindi, and an un- 
determined but small amount of rock im- 
mediatly north of the north caisson sill of 
Gatun locks, can be removed by the suction 
dredges. 

In the lower lock at Gatun the concrete 
layers are at work on the last of the piers, 
against which a bulkhead will be built to keep 
water from the lock chambers, while a suction 
dredge is excavating for the foundations of the 
north guide walls and in the north forebay of 
the locks. After all the material that can be 
taken out by this method has been removed, 
the fbrebay will be unwatered, in order that 
the guide and flare walls may be built in the 
dry. The remaining excavation will prob- 
ably be done by dipper dredges. 



Testing Lock Machine Motors. 

A shed has been erected near the locks at 
Gatun in which motors purchased for the 
operation of the lock valve machines are 
given tests for the climatic conditions on the 
Isthmus. Shop tests are now in progress in 
the States, where the motors will be put 
through a working trial with one of the valve 
machines now ready at the works of the 
Wheeling Mold & Foundry Company. Eight 
motors were purchased from three manu- 
facturers, out of a total of 236 required, and 
on the result of the tests in the States and the 
climatic tests on the Isthmus the general order 
will be given. The object of the test on the 
Isthmus is to determine which type of motor 
will best stand the deteriorating effects of the 
climate. Upon their arrival, the motors were 
placed in the dry room of the storehouse at 
Gatun, and there the insulation resistance 
was measured at regular intervals for a week, 
and after storage in the dry room, it was 
measured further at intervals of twenty-four 
hours. 

The tests include (1) the measuring of in- 
sulation resistance of the motors and the ap- 
plication of a 1,500- volt high potential test 
for one minute; (2) measuring of insulation 
resistance just prior to turning on steam and 
at intervals of six hours thereafter; (3) re- 
moval of handhole covers to admit saturated 
steam to the room so that the air is at a tem- 
perature of 50 degrees centigrade; (4) subject 
all motors to a high potential test of 1,000 
volts ten seconds every twenty-four hours. 
These tests will be continued for one week. If 
the data do not show any decided results, the 
tests will be continued, but in a temperature 
of 75 degrees centigrade. In addition the 



motors will be immersed in water at normal 
air temperature, and the insulation resistance 
will be measured just prior to immersion and 
after immersion. At intervals of six hours 
for two days just prior to removal from the 
water a high potential test of 500 volts will 
be applied for ten seconds. 

If these tests do not show conclusive results 
internal heat will be applied by running the 
motors on regular pressure or at higher pres- 
sure to produce the desired heating effect. 
This test will show the rapidity with which 
the moisture in the insulation will be driven 
off, and will also render the insulation more 
porous and finally weaken it as to its in- 
sulating properties. 



At the Pacific Entrance. 

Clapet No. 5, formerly a part of the 
Pacific Division dredging fleet, has been con- 
verted into a tank vessel, and will be used in 
storing water at Flamenco Island. It was re- 
built in 1900. and continued in the dredging 
work until 1910, when it was placed out of 
commission. The hoppers in the hull of the 
vessel have been sealed up with concrete, 
and will be used as tanks, holding altogether 
about 300 tons of water. 

Clapet No. 6 is on the shipways undergoing 
repairs to its hull. It was rebuilt in 1905, and 
has been in continuous service since then. 

The dredges at the Pacific entrance are 
now working wholly in rock, the mud deposits 
in the part of the channel where they are 
excavating, having been removed with the 
exception of those created by silting. The 
dredges are now working in the Canal, south 
of the site of the new cofferdam. 



Slides at Gatun Locks. 

Part of the earth bank behind the east wall 
of the lower lock at Gatun sank on the morn- 
ing of September 29, and rose up a few feet 
away. The movement was apparently 
caused by the rock fill which carries the tracks 
on which the cableway towers run, and only 
a few hours before the sinking occurred one 
of the towers was on the section which fell. 
The lock wall has been constructed at this 
point to a sufficient height to keep the moving 
earth from sliding into the lock chamber, and 
no difficulty was experienced from this source. 
But the work of repairing the track fill took 
four days, and the concrete laying in t he- 
lower locks was delayed by that much. Only 
a week before, a similar sinking under the 
cableway tracks occurred on the west side oi 
the locks. 

These movements of the earth at the lower 
locks began about a year ago. They are due 
entirely to the nature of the soil which o\ , - 
lies the firmer earth and rock upon which the 
locks are founded. It is singularly lacking in 
coherency and moves on a very flat slope. As 
a re?ult the excavation in the lower locks \\a> 
continually hampered by sections of the banks 
falling or sliding into the pit. The total 



42 



THE CANAL RECORD 



Vol. V., No. 6. 



NOTES OF PROGRESS. 



(Continued.) 



amount of material that has moved in this 
manner is probably not over fifty thousand 
cubic yards, yet it has retarded excavation, 
and consequently the laying of concrete. 
The most serious consequence has been that 
it has caused a four month's delay in the com- 
pletion of the cofferdam across the lower end 
of the locks behind which suction dredges are 
to excavate for the north forebay and the 
wing walls. The piers for this bulkhead are 
now nearing completion. In the laying of 
concrete the slides have had the effect of 
limiting the space in which the cableways can 
operate over the lock chamber, and thus of 
restricting the amount that can be placed. 
It was believed that when the walls were com- 
pleted to a height to keep the banks from 
sliding into the lock chamber, all the trouble 
would be past; but the movement of the 
light soil under the fills necessary for the 
cableway tower tracks has introduced a new 
difficulty, which although not serious may 
continue to retard the work in the lower locks. 



Porto Bell.) Crusher. 
A statement of the work done at the Porto 
Bello crusher, by days, for the week ending 
September 30, follows: 



Date. 


Hours 
worked. 


Cubic 
Yards. 




4.26 
4.01 
4.48 
4.10 
4.51 
4.57 


1,853 




1,782 




1,992 




1,829 




1,982 




1,959 






Total 


27.13 


11.397 



Ancon Crusher. 
A statement of rock crushed at the Ancon 
quarry during the week ending September 
30. follows: 



Date. 


Hours 
worked. 


Cubic 
Yards. 




7,50 
6.45 
7.45 
6.40 
6.55 
7.40 


2,857 




3.317 




2 805 




2,575 




2,619 




2,782 






Total 


43.35 


16,955 







Gatun Dam Spillway 
The concrete work in the Spillway of Gatun 
Dam is about 70 per cent completed, 157,074 
cubic yards, out of a total of 225,000, having 
been placed at the close of work on Septem- 
ber 30. A statement of the amount laid each 
working day last week, and of the total in 
place, follows: 



Date. 


Concrete 
Laid. 


Hours 
worked. 


No. 
Mixers. 




102 
128 
96 
142 
100 
100 


6.00 
7.00 
5.30 
7.00 
6.00 
6.00 


1 








1 




1 




1 




1 






Total 


668 
156.406 


37.30 


1 


Previously reported . . . 




Grand total 


157,074 





Improvements at Railroad Station in Panama. 

A shed will be placed over the platform at 
the railroad station in Panama to protect 
persons alighting from and boarding passenger 



trains from the showers which are so frequent 
during the rainy season. The shed will extend 
from the hospital car gate to the last of the 
exits for first-class passengers, thus including 
all exits. It will be 605 feet long, 24 feet wide, 
and 14 feet high at the eaves, and will be 
built of iron frame and corrugated iron roof. 
Shelters will extend from the platform to the 



exits, and also to the gates through which 
passengers go to take the train. A shelter, 
40 feet long and 20 feet wide, will be built on 
the street side of the railway station, in front 
of the entrance to the waiting room for 
first-class passengers, to the end that persons 
may alight from coaches and enter the sta- 
tion without being subjected to rains. 



CONCRETE WORK IN THE LOCKS. 



Over 66 per cent of the concrete is in place, the amount at the close of work on Sep- 
tember 30, being 2,796.170 cubic yards, out of a total of approximately 4,199,400. A total 
of 33,396 cubic yards of concrete was laid in the locks during the week ending September 30. 

GATUN LOCKS. 

Over 81.5 per cent of the concrete for the system of three twin locks at Gatun has been 
laid, the amount in place at the close of work on September 30, being 1,624,039J cubic yards, 
out of a total of 2,000,000. A statement of the amount of concrete placed in the locks each 
working day for the week ending September 30, and of the total, follows; and a similar state- 
ment for the work in the spillway of Gatun Dam is published elsewhere in this issue. The 
construction plant works 12 hours daily, and the auxiliary plant 9 hours. 



Date. 


Construction Plant. 
2-cubic yard mixers. 


Auxiliary Plant. 
2-cubic yard mixers. 


Large 
stone. 


Total. 




Concrete 
placed. 


Hours 
worked. 


No. of 

mixers 


Concrete Hours ' No. of 
placed. 1 worked, mixers 




Cu. Yds. 
1,980 
1,904 
2,100 
1,912 
1,538 
1,122 


32.04 
30.58 
31.58 
30.14 
23.44 
16.38 


4 
4 
4 
4 
4 
4 


Cu. Yds. 
316 
236 
418 
224 
190 
468 
406 


6.40 
5.40 
7.40 
5.40 
3.40 
7.40 


2 
2 
2 
2 
2 
2 


Cu. Yds. 
80 
78 


Cu. Yds. 
2,376 










2 136 








1,590 




















Total 


10,556 


165.36 


4 


2,258 


37.00 


2 


158 


12,972 
1,611,067} 
























1,624,0394 



*The 406 yards shown for the portable mixers are reinforced concrete, and were placed on the following days : 
September 25th, 53; September 26th, 93; September 27th. 69J; September 28th, 87$; September 29th, 65; 
September 39th, 38. 

PEDRO MIGUEL LOCKS. 

Concrete work in the locks at Pedro Miguel is over 87 per cent completed, 730,654 cubic 
yards, out of a total of 837,400, bucket measurement, having been placed at the close of work 
on September 30. The record for each of the six 8-hour working days of last week, follows: 





Auxiliary Plant. 


Large 
stone. 




Date. 


2-cubic yard mixers. 


i-cubic yard mixers. 


Total. 




Concrete 
placed . 


Hours 
worked. 


No. of 
mixers 


Concrete 
placed. 


Hours 
worked. 


No. of 

mixers 




September 25 

September 26 

September 27 


Cu. Yds. 
540 
510 
490 
440 
390 
420 


15.00 
15.00 
14.00 
13.00 
12.00 
13.00 


2 
2 
2 
2 
2 
2 


Cm. Yds. 

103 

78 

97 

97 

218 

185 


5.00 
5.50 
7.75 
6 00 
15.00 
11.50 


1 
2 
3 
2 
2 
3 


Cu. Yds. 


Cu. Yds. 
643 
588 
587 
537 


September 29 

September 30 


608 
605 


Total 


2,790 


82.00 


2 


778 


50.75 


2.17 


4,411 


3,568 




727,086 
































4,411 


730,654 



















MIRAFLORES LOCKS. 

Over 32 per cent of the concrete for the system of two twin locks at Miraflores was in 
place on September 30, the total amount on that date being 441,447, cubic yards, bucket 
measurement, out of a total of approximately 1,362,000. The record for each of the six 8-hour 
working days of last week, follows: 





Construction Plant. 
2-cubic yard mixers. 






Auxiliary Plant. 








Date. 


2-cubic yard mixers. 


}-cubic yard mixei 




Total. 




Concrete Hours 
placed. I worked. 


No. of 

mixers 


Concrete 
placed. 


Hours 
worked . 


No. of Concrete 
mixers placed. 


Hours 
worked. 


No. of 
mixers 


Large 

stone. 




Sept. 25 . . 
Sept. 26. . 
Sept. 27 . . 
Sept. 28. . 
Sept. 29. . 
Sept. 30. . 


Cu. Yds. 
1.118 
1,208 
910 
766 
782 
812 


28.67 
27.83 
25.75 
18.80 
19.67 
24.17 


6 
4 
4 
6 
6 
6 


Cu. Yds. 
1,162 
1.192 
1,024 
980 
672 
1.304 


14.60 
15.90 
13.60 
11.90 
11.00 
17.00 


2 

2 
2 
2 
2 

2 


Cu. Yds. 
294 
334 
276 
335 
306 
370 


24.00 
26.15 
23.50 
22.50 
26 00 
29.50 


4 
4 

4 
4 
4 
4 


Cu. Yds. 


Cu. Yds. 
2,574 
*2,745 
2,210 
2,081 
1.760 
2.486 


Total... 
Previously 
reported . 


5,596 


144 89 


5.33 


6.334 


84.00 


.' 


1,915 


151 65 


4 


3.693 


13,856 
427.621 






















Grand 


3,693 


441,477 

























"Includes 1 1 cubic yards laid by hand . 



October 4, 1911. 



THE CANAL RECORD 



43 



EXECUTIVE ORDERS. 



Special Commissioner on Industrial and Com- 
mercial Value of the Canal. 

By order of the President, Professor 
Emory R. Johnson is hereby appointed a 
Special Commissioner for the purpose of 
bringing up to as late, a date as practicable 
the data contained in the Report of the 
Isthmian Canal Commission for 1899-1901 
relative to the industrial and commercial 
value of the Isthmian Canal, and also to 
formulate rules and regulations governing the 
measurement of ships going through the Canal 
and to make an investigation and recom- 
mendation regarding the tolls to be charged. 
Until his report is forthcoming Professor 
Johnson will be allowed his actual expenses 
and fifteen dollars a day including Sundays 
and holidays. Upon the completion of Profes- 
sor Johnson's work the Secretary- of War will 
finally fix his entire compensation. 

Henry L. Stimson, 

Secretary of War. 
War Department, 

September 1, 1911. 

Removal of Packing or Waste from Journal Boxes 
of Railroad Equipment. 

By virtue of the authority vested in me I 
hereby establish the following Order for the 
Canal Zone 

Section 1. Any person who shall without 
lawful authority take or remove the packing 
or waste from out of any journal box or boxes 
of any locomotive engine, tender, coach, 
caboose or truck, used or operated on any 
railroad, shall be guilty of a misdemeanor, 
and upon conviction shall be sentenced to pay 
a fine not exceeding One Hundred Dollars, 
or imprisonment in jail not exceeding thirty 
days, or both fine and imprisonment, in the 
discretion of the court. 

Section 2. This order shall take effect 
sixty davs from and after this date. 

Wm. H. Taft. 
The White House, 
September 14, 1911. 



Pilots, Mates, Masters, Engineers, Chauffeurs. 

Examinations for pilots, mates, masters, 
and engineers; and for chauffeurs, will be 
held by the Board of Local Inspectors at the 
Administration Building, Ancon, on October 
11. All applicants for licenses as chauffeur 
must secure from the Department of Civil 
Administration, Executive Office, Ancon, 
forms of application, and information re- 
specting the filling out of the same, not later 
than the day previous to the examination. 
All applicants for examination must be 
present at the Administration Building at 
8:00 a. m. on October 11, with papers in 
proper form. In addition, applicants for 
chauffeurs' licenses must demonstrate their 
capacity properly to operate an automobile, 
and must have che automobile with them. 



Oil Pipe Line Changes. 
On Monday, September 11, the Union Oil 
Company abandoned its line along the old 
railroad right-of-way from Barbacoas bridge, 
near San Pablo, to Gatun, a distance of about 
18 miles, and no oil will be pumped across the 
Isthmus until the completion of the oil 
company's new line, which will parallel the 
Panama railroad relocation from Caimito 
Junction to Gatun. About two miles of line 
have already been laid at each end of the gap, 
leaving 65.000 feet, or nearly 13 miles to be 



placed. The crossover from Barbacoas 
bridge, where the old line now terminates, to 
Caimito Junction on the railroad relocation, 
has been built, and is ready for service. The 
construction work between Caimito Junction 
and Gatun will be begun at once, working 
from the south end, and using the material 
removed from the old pipe line. It is believed 
that the work of closing the gap on the relo- 
cation can be accomplished in two and one- 
half to three months, depending on weather 
conditions. There has been placed in storage 
in the tanks at Mount Hope, oil to the amount 
of 110,000 barrels, equivalent to a four 
months' supply for the works at that end of 
the Canal, at the present rate of consumption. 
The amount of oil in the tanks at Petrolia 
will shortly be increased to 150,000 barrels, 
making the total amount in storage on the 
Isthmus upward of 260,000 barrels. 

During the month of August, deliveries 
to the Commission aggregated 74,413 barrels, 
or a little less than the April, 1911, deliveries, 
which are the largest made in any one month 
to date. The deliveries to the Commission 
during the current year, at the present rate 
of consumption, will considerably exceed 
those for any year previous since oil began to 
be used as fuel on the Canal works. The 
record of deliveries, by months, from Jan- 
uary 1, 1911, to September 1, from the oil 
company's tanks, follows: 



Months. 


I. C. C. 


Others. 


Total. 




62,640 
72.939 
66,766 
74,930 
72,020 
71,032 
69,228 
74.413 


1,195 
4,797 
4,911 
2.527 
3.225 
6.269 
2,983 
4,044 


63,835 




77,736 




71,677 




77.457 




75,245 




77,301 


July .... 


72,211 




78,457 






Total 


563,968 


29,951 


593,919 







The total deliveries of oil from the Union 
Oil Company's tanks on the Isthmus during 
August exceeded the record for any previous 
month. 

Three ships are now engaged in the oil 
carrying trade to the Isthmus, the Pectan of 
65,000 barrels capacity, and the Trinculo 
and Oberon of 45,000 barrels capacity each. 
A new vessel is now under construction in 
English yards, which will be chartered by the 
oil company as an addition to its fleet. It 
will be completed early next year, and will be 
of practically the same capacity as the 
Pectan. 



Dredge No. 6 to be Destroyed. 

Ladder dredge No. 6, which sank in the 
Atlantic entrance to the Canal, near the inter- 
section of the French Canal, on June 19, will 
be destroyed. A diver is now at work taking 
off such parts as may be utilized to advantage 
on the other dredges and, after it has been 
stripped, the hull with its ladder will be blown 
up by dynamite. The pieces will be taken 
from the Canal channel by one of the crane 
boats and stored on the island opposite the 
Mount Hope marine shop. 

This dredge was built in Scotland and 
brought to the Isthmus by the old French 
company for dredging in the entrance to the 
Canal at Cristobal. It was taken from the 
storage bay for floating equipment at Folks 
River in 1905 and, after partial repairing, was 
used for about a year. In 1908 it was placed 
in dry dock and the hull was repaired, after 
which it was returned to work in the Atlantic 
entrance, where it was operated for a period 



of eighteen months before repairs were again 
necessary. It was thoroughly overhauled in 
the fall of 1909, and continued in the service 
without extensive repairs until the time it 
sank. At that time there were only two care- 
takers on board, and the investigation held 
soon afterwards did not determine the cause 
of the accident. It was first planned to raise 
the dredge, but an examination of the hull 
showed that the plates were in such bad 
condition that they probably would not stand 
the severe strain incident to righting it. On 
this account its destruction was decided upon. 



Steam Shovel Record for One Year on P. R. R. 
Relocation. 

On September 7, 1911,>team shovel No. 257 
completed a year of continuous work on the 
Relocation of the Panama Railroad. This 
shovel came out of Empire Shop and com- 
menced work September 8, 1910. It has 
loaded more or less material every one of the 
304 working days between those dates, and 
in eight of the calendar months included in 
this period, has held the record for yardage 
on the Isthmus. The following table shows in 
detail the work done: 





Output by cross-section. 


Month. 










Earth 


Rock 


Total 


1910. 


Cu. Yds 


Cu. Yds 


Cu. Yds 




2.725 


37.030 


39,755 


October 


7.900 


45,109 


53.009 


November 


8,330 


45,000 


53,330 


December 


7.000 


40,440 


47,440 


1911. 










4.000 


53,310 


57,310 




1,345 


57,550 


58,895 




5,400 


64.200 


69,600 
62,540 
70.030 
58,850 
57 270 
















58,850 


July 




57,270 






71.550 








15.200 


15,200 






Total 


36,700 


678.079 


714,779 






Per cent of 




Month. 


Output 


Time that 


No. of 


by Car 


Shovel 


Working 




Report 


Worked 


Days 


1910. 








September 


37,840 


64.3 


20 




58.030 


66. 1 


26 




50,020 


64. 1 


24 


December 


50,660 


62.5 


26 


1911. 










56,730 


75.0 


25 




60,210 


79.9 


23 


March 


67,900 


77.2 


27 




61,100 
72,030 


70.7 
77.6 


24 




26 




65,260 
62.540 
76,030 


72.4 
74.6 
80.3 


26 


July 


25 




27 




15.200 


76.9 


5 


Total 


733.550 


72.3 


304 



Note: 

Average output per day. 2.351 cubic yards. 

Output for September, 1911 (5 days) taken from 

car report. 
Working days are eight hours. 

Until April, 1911, this shovel was taking 
out main line cuts on the steep side hill south 
of Gatun, the height of the bank being 
generally over 100 feet , and running up to 
165 feet. Under these conditions slides inter- 
fered more or less with the work. Since April 
the shovel has been in a borrow pit. Through- 
out the year the material was argillaceous 
sandstone, similar to that found in the Gatun 
lock site. The output has been loaded into 
1(1 yard dump cars. J. H. LaRowe has been 
engineer on this shovel during the entire year 
with \Y. E. Reader. E. E. Austin and others 
as craneman. Handling of trains, shifting the 
shovel, drilling and blasting has been in 
charge of C. G. Jones, supervisor. The shovel 
is a 103 ton model with 5 yard dipper. 



44 



THE CANAL RECORD 



Vol. V., No. 6. 



TRAFFIC BY PANAMA ROUTE. 



Freight Increase of Twenty-Two Per cent— Ton- 
nage at Entry Ports — Passenger Business. 

Freight tonnage by the Panama railroad 
increased 22.39 per cent during the year end- 
ing June 30, 1911, over that for the previous 
fiscal year. The revenue tonnage, that is 
freight exclusive of that carried for the rail- 
road company, increased 23.04 per cent. 
The increase was in both freight carried 
southbound and northbound, and represents all 
traffic except that to Panama from the United 
States and to San Francisco from Europe 



in the southbound trade, and that from 
Panama to the United States and from 
Central America and Mexico to the United 
States in northbound traffic. The following 
statement summarizes the tonnage for the 
fiscal year 1911, as compared with that of 
1910: 





1911 


1910 


Increase 


Southbound 

(to Panama) . . . 
Northbound 

(From Panama) . 


1,178,560 
378,470 


991.856 
280.361 


18.82 
34.99 


Total 


1,557,030 1 1,272,217 


22.39 



Statements of freight tonnage handled during the years 1911 and 1910, showing origin 
and destination, follow: 



FROM ALL POINTS TO ALL POINTS. 



Colon to Panama — 

New York. Philadelphia, and Gulf ports to San Francisco 

New York and Gulf ports to Panama South Pacific Central America 

and Mexico 

Europe to Panama, South Pacific, Central America, Mexico and San 

Francisco - 

Colon to Panama (local) — 

Commercial 

Isthmian Canal Commission 

Company freight 



Total 

Panama to Colon — 

San Francisco to New York, Philadelphia, and Gulf ports 

South Pacific, Central America, Mexico, and Panama, to New York and 

Gulf ports 

South Pacific, Central America, Mexico, San Francisco and Panama to 

Europe 

San Francisco to Colon 

Panama to Colon (local) — 

Commercial freight 

Isthmian Canal Commission 

Company freight 



Total 

Total westbound and eastbound . 



96,420 

103.989 

123,291 

139.145 

691,890 

23,825 



1115,509 
59,823 

67,739 

397 

33,534 

91,944 

n 9.524 



378.470 



1.557,030 



1910 



46,394 

89,856 

110,518 

131,983 

587,483 

25,622 



991,856 



33.482 
60,846 



Increase 



Per cent 
107.83 

15.73 

11.56 

5.43 

17.77 
*7.01 



18.82 



244.99 
*1.68 



48,089 I 40.86 

83 378.31 

31,673 I 5.88 

97,974 I *6.15 

8.214 15.95 



280,361 1 34.99 



1,272,217 | 22.39 



COUNTRIES OF ORIGIN AND DESTINATION. 



Colon to Panama — 


921.968 
47,039 

110,914 

98,067 

572 


811.853 

38,125 

92,984 

48,271 

623 


13.56 




23.38 




19.28 




103.16 




*8.19 








1,178.560 


991.856 


18.82 


Panama to Colon — 




139.159 
33.635 
87,670 

117.658 
348 


142,540 

19,673 

83,754 

34,055 

339 


*2.37 




70.97 




4.68 




245.49 




2.65 








378,470 


280,361 


34.99 








1,557,030 


1,272.217 


22.39 



♦Decrease. 



Vessels 


PORT BUSINESS. 
ARRIVING r\ 1910 AND 1911. 












Kind 


Vessels 




1911 


1910 


Increase 


Decrease 




Num- 
ber 


Per 

cent 


Num- 
ber . 


Per 

cent 




Coal 
Other Freight 


86 
1,613 
1,699 


91 
1,247 
1,338 






5 


5.49 




366 
361 


29.35 
26.98 




















All 


243 


212 


31 


14.62 













The revenue freight, including both mer- 
chandise and coal amounted to 1,523,681 
tons, an increase of 285,300 tons or 23.04 
per cent. The total revenue derived from 
this traffic was $2,398,177.88 an increase of 
$25,605.94 or 1 .08 per cent. Company freight 
amounted to 33,349 tons, and there were car- 
ried 3,449 tons of mail and baggage. 2,909 
tons of express, which are included in the 
totals quoted. Of the freight tonnage 75.69 
per cent was southbound, and 24.31 north- 
bound, as compared with 77.96 and 22.04 
per cent for the previous year. The through 
freight tonnage was 36.42 per cent of the total 
handled as against 30.60 per cent in 1910. 
Coal, including that for the company, com- 
prised 49.53 percent of the local traffic south- 
bound. 

Freight southbound from various sources 
shows the following increases: 

From New York, Philadelphia, and Gulf 
ports to — 



South Pacific ports 

San Francisco 

Central America and Mexico. 
Panama 



Tons. 
10.881 
50.026 

6,337 
*3,085 



7,049 
3.427 
2.527 
*230 



From Europe to — 

South Pacific ports 

Panama 

Central America and Mexico 

San Francisco 

*Decrease. 

In the northward direction the following 
increases are shown: 
To New York, Philadelphia and Gulf ports, 

from — 

Tons. 

South Pacific ports 1,014 

San Francisco 82,026 

Panama *850 

Central America and Mexico *1,186 

*Decrease. 

To Europe from — 

South Pacific ports 2,902 

San Francisco 1,262 

Panama 328 

Central America and Mexico 15,158 

A statement showing the number of pas- 
sengers carried on the railroad and earnings 
follows: 



Class. 


1911 


1910 


Increase 
Per cent 


First 

Second 


696,688 
1,715.466 


627,397 
1,600,172 


11.04 
7.21 


Total 


2,412,154 


2,227,569 


8.29 



The gross revenue from the transportation 
of passengers was $686,991.25, a decrease of 
3.52 per cent from 1910, while the number . 
of passengers carried shows an increase of 
184,585, or 8.29 per cent. The revenue re- 
ceived from through passengers shows an 
increase of $6,542.24, or 20.92 percent, and the 
number of through passengers an increase 
of 2,563, or 36.56 per cent. There was a de- 
crease of 4.64 per cent in revenue from local 
passengers, and an increase of 8.20 per cent 
in the number carried. 









Tonnage of 


Vessels at Ports 


IN 1911 AND 1910. 














Kind. 


Tonnage 




Received. 


Despatched. 


Total. 


Port 


1911. 


1910. 


Increase. 


1911. 


1910. 


Increase. 


1911. 


1910. 


Increase. 




Tons. 


Per 
cent. 


Tons. 


Per 
cent. 


Tons. 


Per 
cent. 




Coal . . 


492,284 
749,375 


490,974 
577,927 


1,310 
171,448 


0.27 
29.66 










492,284 
1,019,867 


490,974 
747,028 


1.310 
272,839 


0.27 


and 


Other Freight. 
All 


270,492 


169,101 


101,391 


59.96 


36.52 






Total 


1,241.659 


1,068,901 


172,758 


16. 16 


270,492 


169,101 


101.391 


59.96 


1,512,151 


1,238,002 


274.149 


22.14 




257,383 


180,094 


77,289 


42.92 


242,563 


174,522 1 68,041 


38.97 


499,946 


354,616 


145.330 


40.98 



October 4, 1911. 



THE CANAL RECORD 



45 



FENDER CHAINS. 



Method of Operating Chains That will Guard 
Approach to Lock Gates. 

Proposals have been requested for materials 
for chain fenders for all the locks, and bids 
will be opened at the Washington office on 
November 14. Included in the proposed con- 
tract are castings for hawse-pipe, cylinders and 
detail parts, certain structural materials, 
operating valves, piping and fittings from 
cylinders to pump and tank, and mechanism 
for starting and stopping the pump. Parts 
not included are the main pumps and motors 
and all electrical machinery and wiring, 
chains, suction tanks, resistance valves, 
stairways and gratings, drainage pumps, their 
motors, piping etc., also riveted steel anchor- 
ages attached to hawse-pipe castings. 

The function of the fender chains is to pre- 
vent the lock gates (used as a bulkhead or 
dam across axis of locks to form a higher level 
of water, which may have no corresponding 
amount of water against them on the down- 
stream side), from being rammed by a ship 
that may approach too near the gates under 
its own steam or by escaping from the tow- 
ing locomotives. They will therefore be 
placed on the up-stream side of the following 
gates: Gatun — Upper guard gates, inter- 
mediate and safety gates of the first or upper 
locks. Pedro Miguel — Upper guard, inter- 
mediate and safety gates. Miraflores Locks — 
Upper guard, intermediate and safety gates 
of the upper locks. At the lower end of each 
flight of locks are guard gates, mitering in an 
opposite direction from the lock gates, whose 
function is to keep water from the chamber 
between these gates and the lower operating 
gates, in case it is desired to pump water from 
this chamber for the purpose of repairing or 
painting the lower lock gates. In front of 
these guard gates chain fenders will also be 
stretched. In all 24 fender chains and 48 
machines will be required. 

In operation the chain will be stretched 
across the lock chamber from the top of the 
opposing walls, and when it is desired to allow 
a ship to pass, the chain will be lowered into 
a groove made for the purpose in the lock 
floor. It will be raised again after the ship 
passes. The raising and lowering will be ac- 
complished from both sides by mechanism 
mounted in pits or chambers in the lock walls 



as shown in sketches, herewith. This mech- 
anism as designed consists of a hydraulically 
operated system of cylinders, and a train of 




O a, 

- -a 
e c 
o r: 

a >■ 
;0 

o _ 

u o 



O 




Sketch showing general layout of Fender 
Chain Operating Machinery. 

sheaves by which one foot of movement by 
the cylinder accomplishes four feet by the 
chain. 

The system of cylinders consists of one 




Elevation Showing Cylinders, Plunger, and 

Sheaves. 



fixed cylinder 40 inches in diameter, one 
cylinder 38 inches in diameter moving within 
this, and a fixed plunger 25 inches in diameter 
upon which the smaller cylinder moves. 
The cylinder is actuated by water forced into 
the large cylinder for downward motion or 
raising the chain, and into the small cylinder 
for upward motion or lowering the chain. 
This change of flow is produced by varying the 
position of the operating valve by means of a 
solenoid operated by remote control. A large 
open tank provides storage for the water dis- 
placed in the outer cylinder as the moving 
cylinder rises, and also makes up for the 
waste due to leakage and evaporation. The 
stroke of the cylinder is 21 feet 6 inches, and 
each complete movement therefore raises or 
lowers the chain 86 feet for each machine, or 
192 for both. The operating pressure is 60 
pounds per square inch. 

Water is forced into the cylinders by a 
centrifugal pump, situated in the pit, which 
is started automatically by a quick-acting 
electric switch, operated by a system of rods 
and levers, actuated by a stop fastened to the 
guide yoke attached to the moving cylinder. 
This mechanism also prevents any consid- 
erable movement of the cylinder through 
leakage, insuring the continued maintenance 
of the chain in its upper or lower positions. 
The smaller cylinder carries two sheaves by- 
means of eyebars attached to a crosshead at 
its lower end. Two similar sheaves at right 
angles to the lower ones are carried in station- 
ary bearings supported on riveted girders 
spanning the pit. The chain passes through 
a hawse-pipe casting in 
the lock wall, which is 
secured to heavy riveted 
anchorages embedded in 
the concrete. A riveted 
strut connects the hori- 
zontal girders with the 
hawse -pipe casting, so 
that the entire outward 
pull of the chain is trans- 
ferred to the anchorages. 
The chain is supported 
on an idler fastened to 
the hawse-pipe casting, 
then makes a quarter 
turn around one of the 
fixed sheaves, passes down and makes a half 
turn around one of the lower movable 
sheaves, rises up again, making a half turn 
around the second stationary sheave and 
going down on the other side of the ma- 
chine. It then makes a half turn around the 
second movable sheave and, passing up, has 
its end fastened to one of the girders at the 
top of the pit. 

If a ship should run into the fender, exert- 
ing a pressure of more than 750 pounds to the 
square inch, the chain will be paid out grad- 
ually by an automatic release until the vessel 
comes to a stop. For instance, a ten thousand 
ton ship, running at four knots an hour, strik- 
ing the fender, would travel 72 feet 6 inches 
after striking the chain before coming to a 
stop. The resistance to the paying out of the 
chain is provided for by two resistance valves 
arranged in parallel. These valves are so 
designed as to remain closed until the pressure 
back of them rises to 750 pounds per square 
inch, when they open automatically main- 
taining a constant pressure, and hence stress, 
on the chain. 



46 



TH,E CANAL RECORD 



Vol. V., No. 6. 



REVOLVER MATCHES. 



Results of Pistol Practice by Police and Cule- 
bra Clubs. 

The United States Revolver Association 
championship match held at Culebra on 
September 23, 24 and 25, synchronously with 
the national matches in the United States, 
resulted as follows: 



Possible Scores 


A 
500 


B 
500 


c 

750 


D 

250 


F 

250 


Name 




L. D.Cornish. . . 
C. B. Larzelere. . 
Jacob Bernson . . 


414 
391 
386 
394 
357 


438 
434 
430 
426 


541 
504 
311 


198 
169 
154 


167 
161 
124 
127 


T.E. L. Lipsey. . 






105 




353 
282 
241 
















L. A. Mclntyre 



















point at which it appears being 15 yards away 
from the position in which the contestant 
stands, the farthest, 50 yards distant; distance 
traveled by the figure in the open, 40 yards. 
The figure is drawn across the open space 
away from the marksman at the rate of 40 
yards in ten seconds, and back again at the 
same rate, the effect being to simulate a man 
running from, and toward the marksman 
while making for cover. The Colt's service 
revolver and ammunition are used. 



Remarks: — Match A vvasfor revolvers; Match B for 
pistols; Matches C and D for military revolvers, rapid 
fire, 5 shots in 15 seconds; and Match F for pocket 
revolvers. 5 shots in 30 seconds. 



The finals in the pistol tournament for the 
Canal Zone police were shot off at Gorgona 
on the afternoon of September 23 the ten 
men who had qualified making the following 
scores: 









Score. 


W "C 


Name. Rank. 


Bulls- 


Mov- 




M 


eye 


ing 


Aggre- 






target. 


target. 


gate. 


1 


John W. Maddera 


1 |c. pol. 


65 


36 


101 


?, 


Leo. A. Mclntire. 


Corpora] 


62 


39 


101 


3, 


John Acors 


lie. pol. 


65 


30 


95 


4 


James L. Wood.. . 


1 c. pol. 


56 


35 


91 


5 


Arthur Flood .... 


ljc. pol. 


55 


31 


86 


6 


Walter F. Doby. . 


Corporal 


65 


18 


83 


7 


William Cooney. . 


l|c. pol. 


55 


27 


82 


R 


George W. Lewis . 


Lieut. 


56 


26 


82 


9 


B. F. Merryman.. 


l|c. pol. 


52 


19 


71 


10. 


A. G. Belknap . . . 


Inspectoi 


54 


13 


67 



The tie between Maddera and Mclntire 
was shot off, and the match was won by 
Maddera. He was awarded a bronze medal 
about the size of a peso, containing on its 
face an enameled pistol between the words 
"Police" and "Canal Zone," and on the 
obverse, "Highest score, 1911," with a blank 
for the name of the winner. The trophy was 
offered by the Chief of Police. 

This tournament is the first of the semi- 
annual practice matches that have been 
arranged for the police force, which is corn- 
composed of 153 officers and first-class police- 
men, and 116 second-class, or negro police- 
men. The preliminaries consisted of an 
instruction practice, and a record practice. 
In the record practice there were two classes — 
target and moving figure shooting. The 
distances were 15, 25, and 50 yards, the time 
limit for five shots at the bullseye target 
thirty seconds, and at the moving figure ten 
seconds. The targets were made up, as 
follows: 

Bullseye target — Is a rectangle 6 feet high 
by 4 feet wide. Black circular bullseye, 8 
inches diameter, value of hit, 5; center ring, 
26 inches diameter, value of hit, 4; inner ring, 
46 inches, value of hit, 3; outer, remainder 
of target, value of hit, 2. A ricochet has the 
same value as a direct hit. 

Moving target — Silhouette of a man in the 
standing position on a rectangular target, 
4 by 6 feet, the feet of the silhouette resting 
on the lower line of the target. Value of 
hits, direct or ricochet: On figure, 5; on target, 
outside of figure, 2. The moving target is 
suspended from a taut wire across an open 
space from two clumps of brush, the nearest 



PERSONAL. 



Maj. T. C. Dickson will arrive on the Isth- 
mus, from his annual vacation leave, on the 
Panama, due October 5. 

The Hon. Nicholas Longworth, Member 
of Congress from Ohio, accompanied by his 
wife, is making a visit of one week to the 
Isthmus. They will return to the United 
States by way of New Orleans on Thursday 
the 5th instant. 



Justice of the Supreme Court. 
Mr. William H. Jackson, who has been 
Senior District Judge since June 5, 1911, has 
been appointed Associate Justice of the Canal 
Zone Supreme Court and assumed office on 
September 29. He will preside in the Court 
of the Second Circuit at Empire. The Su- 
preme Court now consists of H. A. Gudger, 
Chief Justice, and Associate Justices Thomas 
E. Brown, Jr., and William H. Jackson. It 
has a full membership for the first time since 
December, 1910. 



Government. The cost of maintenance will 
be borne by the railroad company. Perma- 
nent provision in the shape of a sewer system 
is not made at this time, because it is believed 
the village will cease to be occupied to so 
large an extent as at present, when the Canal 
is in operation, and the railroad is on the 
east side of Culebra Cut. 



Arrival of 10th Infantry. 

The Tenth Regiment of Infantry, U. S. A., 
arrived on the Canal Zone on Wednesday 
morning, having embarked at Galveston, 
Tex. : on September 26, from Fort Sam Hous- 
ton. 

Temporary barracks have been provided 
in canal quarters at Las Cascadas. The reg- 
iment, as it arrived on the Zone, consists 
of ii officers and 813 enlisted men. Col. 
Henry A. Greene is in command. The other 
officers are Lieut. Col. Blauvelt, Maj. Chas. 
Gerhardt, Maj. J. H. Ford, M. D., Capts. 
Lawrence D. Cabell, Q. M., Ralph E. Ingram, 
Frederick W. Coleman, Ethelbert L. D. 
Breckenridge, Jas. J. Mayes, S. W. Widdefield, 
R. C. Humber, Wm. Taylor; First Lieuts. 
John B. Shuman, Walter L. Reed, Jesse 
Gaston, Wm. F. Harrell, Fitzhugh B. Allder- 
dice, Gordon R. Catts, Andrew J. White, 
Chas. F. Conry, H. B. Jones; Second Lieuts. 
John B. DeLancey, Avery B Cummings, 
Ebenezer G. Beuret, Lewis C. Rockwell, 
Wm. J. Fitzmaurice, John H. Stutesman, 
Robt. L. Eichelberger, Herbert E Marsh- 
burn. Fred B. Carrithers, F. B. Grey. Harry 
R. Kutz. 

Second Lieutenants Philip B. Fleming, 
John W. Stewart, Joseph C. Mehaffey, Paul 
S. Reinecke, and Raymon A. Wheeler of the 
Corps of Engineers, U. S. A., have been 
assigned to duty on the Canal work from 
November 25, 1911, to June 15, 1912. . 



Sanitation of Golden Green. 

Temporary sanitation of the village of 
Golden Green, near Culebra, will be accom- 
plished by the installation of six concrete 
lined waterproof vaults, instead of a sewer 
system. The cost will be borne equally by 
'the Panama railroad, on whose land th> 
village is situated, and the Canal Zone 



Manzanillo Canoe Club. 

The Manzanillo Canoe Club was organized 
at Cristobal on September 6, with Oliver G 
Tubby, president; A. A. J. Kopp, vice-presi- 
dent, and J' ptha W. Dibrell, secretary-treas- 
urer. It is the intention of the club to erect 
a thoroughly equipped canoe house on Folks 
River Bay. The membership will be between 
forty and fifty; active membership to be 
confined to canoe owners. Owners, or intend- 
ing owners, of canoes, desiring to become 
associated with the club, may make applica- 
tion for membership. 



Missing Men. 

Any one having information regarding the 
whereabouts of Jules Levy, who is supposed 
to be residing on the Isthmus of Panama, is 
requested to communicate with the Director 
of Posts, Ancon, C. Z. 

Any one having information regarding 
W. M. Palmer, a carpenter by occupation, 
and who is supposed to have come to the 
Isthmus of Panama, is requested to com- 
municate with the American Legation 
Panama. 

Building Notes. 

One of the first permanent buildings to be 
erected on the Canal Zone has been authorized 
for quarters for the caretaker of Brazos 
Brook Reservoir. It will be constructed of 
concrete and will have a tile roof, in contrast 
with the frame buildings with sheet iron roofs 
which are used as Canal quarters. It will be 
one story high and will contain a sitting room, 
dining room, kitchen and pantry, two bed 
rooms, bath, dry room, a servant's room and 
bath. 

A four room school building for the colored 
children of Ancon and Corozal will be erected 
in Ancon from material taken from labor 
barracks at Tabernilla. 

A fifteen-foot addition has been authorized 
for the Ancon Market. 



Obituary. 

W. E. Clayton, an employe of the Atlantic 
Division at Cristobal, died at Colon Hospital 
on September 27. He was forty-five years of 
age, a widower, and had been on the Isthmus 
four years. He is survived by a brother living 
at Huntington, Ind. 

The death of Mrs. Boyd, wife of O. S. 
Boyd, occurred at their home in Cristo- 
bal on Friday, September 20, 1911. She 
had been on the Isthmus for over six years, 
and is survived by her husband and two 
children. Funeral services will be held at 
Christ Church, Colon, on Thursday morn- 
ing October 12, immediately after arrival of 
train No. 2. 



The 
give a 
Ancon, 



United Spanish War Veterans. 

United Spanish War Veterans will 
military ball at the Hotel Tivoli, 
on the evening of November 2, for 



the benefit of their relief fund. 






October 4, 1911. 



THE CANAL RECORD 



47 



Atlantic Entrance Breakwater. 

A lack of piles, with which to continue the 
construction of the trestle from which rock 
is dumped, has caused a partial suspension of 
work on the breakwater at the Atlantic en- 
trance. Three weeks ago the supply of piles 
ran out, two weeks ago one of the steam 
shovels in the quarry suspended work be- 
cause there was no place to dump the rock it 
was excavating, and last week the second 
shovel shut down. It is expected that a ship- 
ment of piles will be received this week, in 
which event, work will be resumed. Of two 
shipments received from the States recently- 
aggregating 2,960 piles, 1,250 piles have been 
condemned. The trestle now extends 6,619 
feet from the shore line tow irds the entrance 
of the Canal, and it is filled with Toro Point 
rock up to within a few feet of the water sur- 
face. This rock disintegrates on exposure to 
the air and, therefore, the superstructure of 
the breakwater will be made with hard rock 
from Porto Bello. 

The second of the derrick barges which will 
handle this rock was launched at Mount Hope 
marine shops on September 28. Its hoisting 
apparatus, a Lidgerwood double drum, with 
14 by 18 inch cylinders, has arrived from the 
States, and this, with boilers from an old 
French clapet and a steam shovel boom 
engine for the swinging apparatus, will be 
installed at once. Work at the marine shops 
is in such condition at present that both the 
derrick barges can now be completed. 



Ladder dredge No. 1 which has had its hull 
plates renewed at the Mount Hope marine 
shop, has rejoined the dredging fleet at the 
Atlantic entrance and is now working just 
outside the shore line. 



Suction dredge No. 86, which underwent 
extensive repairs at the Mount Hope marine 
shop after having completed the fill of Colon, 
has been assigned to work on the hydraulic 
fill of Gatun dam, taking the place vacated 
by the Sandpiper on the north side of the east 
section. 

A petition that the battleship Oregon be as- 
signed first place in the naval pageant, which 
it is assumed will be a feature of the exercises 
at the opening of the Canal, has been re- 
ceived on the Isthmus, and has been referred 
to the Spanish War Veterans for such action 
as they deem fit to take. 

Band Concert 

A concert will be given by the Isthmian Canal Com- 
mission Band at the Hotel Tivoli, Ancon, C. Z.. on 
Sunday, October 8, 1911. at 7.30 p. m. The program 
follows: 

1 . March — Ideal Reeves 

2. Selection — The Pink Lady Caryl 

3. Intermezzo Elegante — From Tales of 

Hoffman Offenbach 

4. Overture — Jolly Robber* Suppe 

5. Characteristic Morceau — OnTiptoe. ... Hosmer 

6. (a) Two-step — Billy Kendis 

(6) Popular March — WhoAreyou With 

Tonightl Van Al.-tyn 

7. Paraphrase — Rocked in the Cradle of the 

Lovcnbcrg 
x. Medley Selection — Rossiter's Popular 

Songs — Alford 

9. March — Kaiser Friedrich Friedman 

Charles E. Jennings, Musical Director. 
The next concert will be given at Cristobal. C. Z.. 
on October 15, at 4.30 p. m. 

Married. 

BUCICLEV-HARRISON — On September 6, in 
Baltimore. Md.. Donald Buckley, of Boston. Mass.. to 
Mamie E. Harrison, of Washington, D. C. the Rev. 
Thomas R. Woodford officiating. Canal Zone residence. 
Culebra. 



COM MISSION CLUBHOUSES. 

Activities of the Younft Men's Christian Associ- 
ation. 

The schedule of moving picture entertainments for 
the week of October 9 to 14 follows: 

Monday, Empire; Tuesday, Culebra; Wednesday, 
Corozal; Thursday. Cristobal; Friday, Gorgona; 
Saturday, Gatun. 

The standing of the Isthmian Bowling League teams 
on Saturday. September 30, was as follows: 

Won. Lost P.C. 

Empire 22 8 .733 

Cristobal 18 12 .600 

Gatun 18 t2 .600 

Gorgona 16 14 .533 

Marines 13 17 .433 

Culebra 4 26 .133 

COROZAL. 

On Tuesday night. September 28, J. L. Malone 
played pool and billiard games, and gave an exhibition. 
In the billiard game he defeated Messrs. Farmer, 
Thompson and Cunningham. 100 to 54. In the pool 
game he defeated Messrs. Wilson and Baker. 75 to 36. 

On Friday the McClintic-Marshall basketball team 
from Pedro Miguel played a practice game with the 
Corozal team. Saturday night the Corozal team will 
meet the Gorgona team at Corozal in the first of the 
league games. 

Twenty-four new books have been ordered for the 
library. 

The improvements authorized for the Corozal club- 
house include an extension in which will be located a 
pair of bowling alleys, a well equipped locker room 
with adjoining shower baths, and a barber shop. 

CULEBRA. 

The volley ball game between the "All Stars" and 
"Married Men" on Tuesday evening was won by the 
married men. The game between the Quartermaster's 
Department and Assistant Engineers on Thursday 
evening was won by the latter. 

The handicap bowling tournament closed on Friday 
evening. Following are the names of the men that 
finished, and their standings: 

Xame Won Lost 

Baumer 17 2 

Bronson. 14 4 

Smith 14 4 

Sjoblum 14 5 

Mitchell 14 5 

Leylander 13 6 

Sickler 13 6 

Fox 10 9 

Driscoll 11 8 

Huttelmaier 6 16 

Warner 5 14 

Mengal 5 14 

Fay. . .. 4 15 

Herrington 4 15 

High Score: Driscoll, 247; Mengel. 213; Case, 205. 

Duckpin score; over 100: Mitchell. 102; Fox. 106. 
109: Hobart. 102, 103. 

The Gatun bowling team took three games from 
Culebra. at Culebra Saturday evening. The scores 
follow : 

Culebra. Gatun. 

Mengel. . 157 179 138 O'Meara. 153 163 179 
Sjoblum. 146 104 Cham'l'n. 180 180 180 

Stilwell. 142 110 132 Beattie... 159 153 148 

Case 167 181 180 Gallowav . 201 154 142 

Dougherty. 162 156 210 Barte . . 148 166 190 

Fay 135 

Total . 774 730 795 S41 816 839 

EMPIRE. 

The following high scores were bowled on the alleys 
during the past week: Tenpins — Pinney 202, 204. 208 
213. 201, 204. 257; Parkis 233. 257; Anderson, 202; 
Giavolli, 201. Duckpins— Coombs. 107. 105; Pulsifer. 
110; Grund, 104; Payne. 115 

The league games bowled on Empire alleys on Sat- 
urday night. September 30. resulted in Empire's win- 
ning three games. Scores were as follows: 

Empire. Gorgona. 

Pinney. .. 162 183 168 OtI8.... 178 156 164 

Giavolli .. 148 193 194 Sims . 163 135 177 

Vnderson 138 170 157 Arnold 139 120 180 

Davis. 179 17S 177 Orr 156 143 156 

Parkis 188 172 18(1 HjM'm'n 172 142 155 

Total 8 15 896 876 808 696 S.iJ 

On Saturday night, October 7. the Gatun nam will 
bowl on tin- Empire alleys m the league series. 

The Isthmian Basket B I will begin the sea- 

son on Saturday. October 7. when the Empire team will 
play Culebra. on the hitters court. 

The regular meeting of the Empire Literary and De- 
bating Society will be held en Friday evening. October 
6. 

On Sunday evening. October 8. there will be an in- 
formal song service at 8.30 o'clock 

GORGONA. 

Mr. Malone, a pool and billiard expert, gave an ex- 
hibition on Wednesday night. September 27. In pool 



he defeated two local players by a score of 140 to 42. 
In billiards he defeated Geo. Strong by a score of 1 50 to 
26andThos. Ryan, 125 to 21. 

At the meeting of the basketball players on Wed- 
nesday night. September 27, Jerry Carpenter was 
elected captain and Geo. Auer, manager. 

In the bowling contest on Gorgona alleys Saturday 
night. Empire took two out of three games from the 
local team. Following arc the scores: 

Empire. Gorgona.. 

Gustavson 168 191 147 Roper . ... 148 133 143 

Spink 148 157 143 W. Var'c'p 159 162 176 

Gorham. 145 157 178 R. Var'c'p 145 103 113 

Pierson 135 167 155 Sexton.. 161 149 171 

Huson... 136 146 164 Haggerty. 137 132 147 



Total 



750 679 755 



732 818 787 

GATUN. 

In the return match game of pool between Malone, 
a professional from the States, and DePoorter, of Gatun, 
the latter was defeated. 

On Saturday evening. September 30. a game of 
basket ball was played at Gatun between two teams of 
the McClintic-Marshall Company. The score resulted, 
Atlantics. 25; Pacifies. 6. The line up: Atlantics — 
Wilson. R. F.; Hortenstine. L. F.; Minotti, C; 
Conley, R. G.; Gibson. L. G.; Pacifies— Cooper. R. F.: 
Ramsey, L. F.; Hutzley, C; Vannerman, R. G.; 
Maguire, L. G. Goals from field: Wilson. 1; Horten- 
stine. 5; Minotti, 3. Conley, 2; Cooper. 1. Fouls: 
Minotti. 3; Cooper. 4. 

On Saturday night, October 7, Gatun will play 
Cristobal in the first basketball game of the season. 

An order for 110 new books was sent to the States 
on Tuesday, October 3rd. These books comprise late 
fiction and some books of a technical character. 

Gatun took all six games of bowling on Saturday, 
September 30. The score on the home alleys was: 

1st game. 2d game. 3rd game. 

Gatun 787 793 776 

Culebra 754 682 676 

A large quantity of gymnasium supplies and 100 
new Gatun pennants have arrived from the States and 
are now on sale. Ten mineralite duckpin bowling balls 
were also received. 

CRISTOBAL. 

Fifty-seven men attended the debate at the meeting 
of the Literary' and Debating Club on Wednesday- 
evening, the subject under discussion being" Resolved, 
That the Initiative. Referendum and Recall are best 
for the government of our States." Decision was in 
favor of the affirmative, after which there was a public 
discussion. 

At the presentation smoker held on Thursday night, 
September 28. there was an attendance of 324. A 
program was rendered and the presentation of medals 
to winners of the Isthmian Duck Pin League by C. M. 
Bullard followed. 

The subject to be discussed before the Debating 
Club on Wednesday evening. October 11, will be 
"Resolved. That the present freedom of the press 
should be restricted." 

The Culebra bowling team will play the Cristobal 
team on the home alleys on Saturday evening. October 

Following is the score of games between bowling the 
Marines from Camp Elliott and Cristobal, at Cristobal 
on Saturday evening. September 30: 

Marines. Cristobal. 
Martins... 118 132 160 Gibson 155 162 158 

Dowel 124 162 158 Blackburn. 160 169 200 
Tryan. 135 129 154 Rabbitt... 165 205 144 
Cataldo. 118 125 152 Bullard. 175 171 192 

Clouse. . 137 160 178 Louch 175 181 181 



Total 



632 708 802 



830 888 875 



Misdirected Letters. 

Ancon. C. Z., October 4, 1911. 
The following insufficiently addressed letters, origi- 
nating in the United Stat possessions, have 
been received in the office of the Director of Posts, and 
may be secured upon request of the addressee: 
Bowie, William H. Killough, Alex 
Bryan. Joseph Marshall, John (2) 
Carnes. J. E. McGowan, r. P. 
Clinton. G. P. Miller. Win. 
Cows. William Mollinhour. H. 
Crawford. David i 2 I Newell. John W. 
Donatello, F. Ornara. John 
Fabian. Lionel J. {Id class) Pavne. Jas. T. 
Parr, Henry W. Powell. C. W. 
Foster, Captain John Rose. L. E. 
Gettin. H. W. St. John. S. W. 
Goldstein. Miss Sara Smith. Mrs. L. 
rlaglund, George E. Webber. Mike 
Hall. Robert Witmer. G. S. 
Hcrshey. A. D. Woods. Louis F. (2) 



Lost — On passenger train arriving at Panama at 
9 a. m.. September 24. a small atlas, and draftsman's 
ruling pen. Finder will please leave with baggage 
agent in the railroad station.at Panama. 



48 



THE CANAL RECORD 



Vol. V., No. 6. 



OFFICIAL CIRCULARS. 

Reduction of Force 

Culebra, C.Z.. September 25. 1911. 
Heads of Departments and Divisions: 

European laborers are being discharged on account 
of reduction of force in the Central Division, and the 
Acting Chief Quartermaster advises that it is impos- 
sible to place these men in other Departments or 
Division In fact, at the present time there appears 
to be a surplus of both European and West 
Indian labor. Some few of the older Spaniards of 
doubtful efficiency have been furnished transportation 
to return to Spain, and it may prove necessary to re- 
sort to wholesale repatriations. In order that the 
present situation may be be handled more intelligently, 
it is requested that you will advise whether the con- 
ditions of your work will require within the next 
several months either an increase or reduction in the 
number of European laborers employed, and what will 
be the probable extent of the increase or reduction. 
Geo. VV. Goethals, 
Chairman and Chief Engineer. 



Acting Depot Quartermaster 

Culebra, C. Z., September 27, 1911. 
Mr. C. L. Parker, 

Assistant Depot Quartermaster, 

Mount Hope, Canal Zone. 
Sir: 

Effective September 28, 1911. and during the 
absence of Captain Courtland Nixon, on leave, you 
will act as Depot Quartermaster. 

You are authorized to receive and receipt for sup- 
plies of the Isthmian Canal Commission consigned to 
Colonel C. A. Devol. or the Chief Quartermaster, 
Isthmian Canal Commission; to accomplish bills of 
lading; to certify invoices for payment as to quantity 
and quality of supplies shown on such invoices; and 
in general to perform such duties as properly belong 
to the position of Depot Quartermaster. 
Respectfullv, 

R. E. Wood, 
A ding Chief Quartermaster. 



Acting as Purchasing Agent 

Culebra, C.Z., September 28, 1911. 
Circular No. 413: 

Effective September 28, 191 1, and during the absence 
on leave of Captain Courtland Nixon, Mr. Charles L. 
Parker, Assistant Depot Quartermaster, will perform 
the duties of Purchasing Agent on the Isthmus. 
Geo. W. Goethals, 
Chairman and Chief Engineer. 



COMMISSARY DEPARTMENT. 



The commissaries are open during the following 
hours : 

Cristobal, 8 a. m. to 12.30 p. m., and 2 to 7 p. m. 
Balboa, 8 a. m. to 12.30 p. m., and 2.30 to 7 p. m. 
Ancon, 8 a. m. to 1 p. m., and 3 to 6 p. m. 
All others, 8 a. m. to 1 p. m., and 3 to 7 p. m. 



Retail prices of cold storage provisions for the week 
beginning October 21. 

The Commissary Bulletin for October contains 
notices of new supplies received, reduction in piices 
on shirts, shoes, and raincoats, and a price list of gro- 
ceries and tobaccos. 

The only material changes in the cold storage price 
list as published in last week's Canal Record are: 

Increased — fresh eggs, from 29 to 30 cents a dozen, 
from 15 to 16 cents a half dozen; ham, 26 to 28 cents 
a pound; lettuce, 12 to 15 cents a pound; romaine, 12 
to 15 cents a pound; tomatoes, 4 to 6 cents a pound; 
peaches, 6 to 8, grapes, 7 to 8. and plums 7 to 10 
cents a pound. Decreased — Cauliflower, 12 to 10 
cents a pound. New apples, 7 cents pei pound. 



Sale of Horizontal Stationary Gasoline Engine 

Sealed bids will be received at the office of the Depot 
Quartermaster, Mount Hope, until two o'clock P. M., 
October 16, 191 1, when they will be opened in the pres- 
ence of attending bidders, for one 2 J horse power 
"Williamsport Special" horizontal stationary gasoline 
engine, complete with battery box. cooling tank and 
driving belt. Engine can be seen and examined on any 
working day between the hours of seven to eleven A.M., 
and one to five P. M., upon application to this office. 
The right is reserved to reject any or all bids. Bids 
must be plainly marked "Proposal to purchase one 
stationary gasoline engine, to be opened October 16, 
1911," and addressed to the Acting Depot Quarter- 
master. Mount Hope. C. Z. 

Charles L. Parker, 
Acting Depot Quartermaster. 



Supplies for the Canal 

The following steamers, with supplies for the Isth- 
mian Canal Commission, arrived at the ports of Cris- 
tobal. Colon and Balboa during the week ending 
September 30: 

Colon, September 24, from New York, with 13 cases 
machinery, 10 cases copper tubes, for Atlantic Division; 



1 ,485 pieces pig iron for Mechanical Division ; 10 barrels 
paint, 158 drums oil, 100 cases linseed oil. 100 cases 
liquid exterminator, 53 pieces black iron pipe. 40 coils 
rope, 50 pieces steel angles, 40 cases stovepipe, for stock; 
and a miscellaneous cargo, the whole consisting of 
2,132 packages, weighing 180 tons. 

Magdalena, September 24, from New York, with 
6 pieces rock skips for Atlantic Division; 

Ballachmyle, September 24, from New York, with 
107,300 bags cement for Atlantic and Pacific Divisions; 
6 cases benzine for stock. 

Lewis Luckenbach, September 24, from New York, 
with 41 crates castings for Atlantic Division. 

San Mateo, September 25, from New Orleans, with 
200 drums gasoline and 6,41 1 pieces yellow pine lumber 
for stock. 

Navajo, September 26, from San Francisco, with 
1,340 bales alfalfa hay for stock. 

Turrialba, September 28, from New Orleans, with 
12 crates concrete mixers for Pacific Division; 425 
pieces white oak lumber, 8,822 pieces yellow pine 
lumber for Mechanical Division; 45 pieces white oak 
lumber, 13,894 pieces yellow pine lumber, 24 pieces 
piling, 75 bales Sucrene feed, 75 bags cotton seed meal, 
357 bales rice straw, 6 cases paint, for stock. 

Almirante, September 28, from New York, with 250 
cases toilet paper. 100 kegs bolts, 36 pieces steel, 76 
kegs track bolts, for stock. 



MOVEMENT OF OCEAN VESSELS. 



Rainfall from September 1 to 30, 1911, Inclusive. 



Stations. 



Pacific Section — 

Ancon 

Balboa 

*Miraflores .... 

Pedro Miguel. . 

Rio Grande. 
Central Section — 

Culebra 

*Camacho 

Empire 

Gamboa 

*Juan Mina . . . 

Alhajuela 

*E1 Vigia 

*Gorgona 

San Pablo 

Tabernilla 

Bohio 

*Monte Lirio . . 
Atlantic Section — 

Gatun 

*Brazos Brook . . 

Cristobal , 

Porto Bello 






Ins. 
2.22 
2.01 
1.21 
1.56 
1.90 

1.50 

1.92 

.83 

.83 

1.92 

2.22 

1.83 

.95 

.66 

1.42 

1.27 

2.38 



.70 

3.20 
2.27 
2.73 





Ins. 


22 


6.03 


22 


8.66 


28 


8.30 


24 


8.31 


30 


6.63 


30 


5.97 


30 


6.97 


30 


5.46 


25 


5.20 


25 


8.56 


25 


9.29 


28 


7.64 


22 


6.41 


26 


3.82 


.»(. 


4.47 


17 


5.30 


25 


11.19 



4.33 

10.32 

11.62 

tl7.55 



*Standard rain gage — readings at 5 p. m. daily. 
Automatic rain gage at unstarred stations — values 
midnight to midnight. "fTo 5 p. m., September 29. 



Stages of the Chagres 

Maximum heights of the Chagres River for the week 
ending midnight, Saturday, September 30, 1911. All 
heights are in feet above mean sea level. 







Station. 






Day and Date. 


Vigia. 


.3 

3 


o 

.0 

E 
O 


6 

o 
M 


c . 


Sun., Sept. 24. . 
Men., Sept. 25. 
Tues.. Sept. 26. 
Wed., Sept. 27 . 
Thurs., Sept. 28 
Fri.,Sept. 29... 
Sat., Sept. 30. . 


127.6 
127.8 
128.4 
127.2 
129.2 
127.4 
127.4 


93.9 
94.0 
94.3 
94.2 
94.9 
94.0 
93.7 


45.9 
47.7 
47.0 
47.3 
48.6 
48.2 
46.7 


14.5 
15.0 
15.0 
15.2 
15.3 
15.8 
15.7 


14.4 
14.6 
14.8 
15.0 
15.1 
15.5 
15.6 


Height of low 


125.0 


92.0 


44.0 







Tide Table. 

The following table shows the time of high and low 
tides at Panama for the week ending October 11, 1911 
(75th meridian time) : 



Date. 


High. 


Low. 


High. 


Low 






A.M. 1 A.M. 


P.M. 


P.M. 




October 5 


1.40 7.50 


2.00 


8.05 




October 6 


2.18 


8.30 


2.40 


8.47 






2.53 


9.10 


3.15 


9.25 




October 8 


3.30 


9.47 


3.50 


10.05 




October 9 


4.05 


10.25 


4.30 


10.40 




October 10 


4.45 


11.05 


5.10 


11.20 






5.25 


11.45 


5.50 













The following is a list of the sailings of the Panama 
Railroad Steamship Company; of the Royal Mail 
Steam Packet Company; of the Hamburg-American 
Line, and of the United Fruit Company's Line; the 
Panama Railroad Company's dates being subject to 
change. 



NEW YORK TO CRISTOBAL. 



Panama. . . 
Cristobal . . 
Advance . . 

Colon 

Allianca. . . 
Panama. . . 
Advance.. . 



Panama. . 
Advance . 
Colon. . . . 
Allianca. . 
Panama. . 
Advance. . 



. . . P. R. R .Friday Sept. 29 

. ..P. R. R.Wednesday.Oct. 4 
. ..P. R. R.Thursday.. Oct. 5 
... P. R. R.Thursday.. Oct. 12 
. . . P. R. R . WednesdayOct. 18 
... P. R. R.Tuesday.. .Oct. 24 
... P. R. R.Monday... Oct. 30 



CRISTOBAL TO NEW YORK. 



.. P. R. R.Thursday.. Oct. 12 
. .P. R. R.. Tuesday.. .Oct. 17 
. . P. R. R.Tuesday... Oct. 24 
. .P. R. R.Monday. ..Oct. 30 

. .P. R. R.Sunday Nov. 5 

. .P. R. R.Saturday. .Nov. 11 



NEW YORK TO COLON. 

Santa Marta U. F. C. Thursday. 

Prinz Sigismund H .-A Friday . . . 

Clyde R. M.. .. Saturday . 

Metapan U. F. C. Thursday. 

Prinz Joachim H.-A. . . .Saturday. 

Zacapa U. F. C. Thursday. 

Prinz Eitel Friedrich H.-A. . . . Friday . . . 

Atrato R. M.. . . Saturday . 

Almirante U. F. C. . Thursday. 

Prinz August Wilhelm.. . .H.-A Saturday. 

Santa Marta U. F. C. Thursday. 

Prinz Sigismund H.-A.. . .Friday. . . . 

Thames R. M„ . . Saturday . 

Metapan U. F. C. Thursday.. 

COLON TO NEW YORK. 



Sept. 28 
Sept. 29 
Sept. 30 
Oct. 5 
.Oct. 7 
.Oct. 12 
.Oct. 13 
.Oct. 14 
.Oct. 19 
.Oct. 21 
• Oct. 26 
Oct. 27 
.Oct. 28 
Nov. 2 



Almirante 

Prinz August Wilhelm . 

Santa Marta 

Prinz Sigismund 

Thames 

Metapan 

Prinz Joachim 

Zacapa 

Prinz Eitel Friedrich. . 

Trent 

Almirante 

Prinz August Wilhelm. 



. ,U. F. C. Thursday. 

.H.-A Tuesday.. 

. .U. F. C. Thursday. 

. H.-A. . . . Saturday . 
. .R. M... .Tuesday.. 
. .U. F. C. Thursday. 

.H.-A. . . .Tuesday.. 
. .U. F. C. Thursday. 

.H.-A. . . .Saturday . 

. R. M. ..Tuesday.. 

.U. F. C.Thursday. 
..H.-A Tuesday.. 



Oct. 5 
Oct. 10 
Oct. 12 
Oct. 14 
Oct. 17 
Oct. 19 
Oct. 24 
Oct. 26 
Oct. 28 
Oct. 31 
Nov. 2 
Nov. 7 



NEW ORLEANS TO COLON. 



Heredia . . . 
Abangarez. 
Cartago . . . 
Atenas. . . . 
Parismina . 
Turrialba. . 
Heredia . . . 
Abangarez. 
Cartago . . . 
Atenas .... 
Parismina . . 



.U. F. C.Wednesday Sept. 27 
.U. F. C. Saturday. .Sept. 30 
. U. F. C. . WednesdayOct. 4 
. U. F. C. . Saturday . . Oct. 7 
.U. F. C.Wednesday.Oct. 11 
. U. F. C. . Saturday . . Oct. 14 
.U. F. C.Wednesday.Oct. 18 
.U. F. C. Saturday.. .Oct. 21 
.U. F. C.Wednesday.Oct. 25 
.U. F. C. Saturday. ..Oct. 28 
.U. F. C.Wednesday.Nov. 1 



COLON TO NEW ORLEANS. 



Heredia U. F. C. Thursday.. Oct. 

Turrialba U. F. C. . Thursday. . Oct. 

Cartago U. F. C. Thursday.. Oct. 

Abangarez U. F. C. . Thursday. . Oct. 

Parismina U. F. C. Thursday.. Oct. 

Atenas U. F. C. Thursday.. Oct. 

Heredia U. F. C. Thursday.. Oct. 

Turrialba U. F. C.Thursday..Oct. 

Hamburg-American steamers leave Colon for New 
York via Kingston at 10 a. m. on sailing dates. The 
Prinz August Wilhelm and Prinz Joachim call at 
Santiago de Cuba, on both outward and homeward 
voyages. 

Royal Mail steamers leave for New York on alter- 
nate Tuesdays, at 10 a. m.; for Southampton on alter- 
nate Tuesdays at 10 a. m. 

United Fruit Company's ships for New Orleans 
direct, leave on Thursdays at 3 p. m.; ships for New 
Orleans in the coastwise service on Thursdays at 4 p. m. ; 
ships for New York via Kingston on Thursdays at 11 
a. m.; for Bocas del Toro on Mondays at 6 p. m. 



Auction Sale of Calves. 

On Saturday, October 7, 1911, at 10 a. m.. there will 
be sold at public sale to the highest bidder at the 
Ancon Hospital dairy, three or four calves, about one 
month old. The dairy is located near the insane 
asylum in the rear of the hospital grounds. The terms 
of the sale will be cash. 



CANAL 




RECORD 



Volume V. 



ANCON, CANAL ZONE, WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 11, 1911. 



No. 7. 



The Canal Record 

Published weekly under the authority and supervision of 
the Isthmian Canal Commission. 



The Canal Record is issued free of charge, one copy 
each, to all employes of the Commission and Panama 
Railroad Company whose names are on the gold roll. 
Extra copies and back numbers can be obtained from the 
news stands of the Panama Railroad Company for five 
cents each. 

Address all Communications 

THE CANAL RECORD, 

Ancon, Canal Zone, 

Isthmus of Panama. 

No communication, either for publication or requesting 
information, will receive attention unless signed with the 
full name and address of the writer. 



NOTES OF PROGRESS. 



Test of Lock Gates. 

The work of erecting the four leaves of the 
upper guard gates at Gatun has so far ad- 
vanced that practically all the structural 
material is in place and the rivetting and 
calking are now in progress. The bridges 
which span the lock chambers, from which 
structural material is lowered for the con- 
struction of the gate leaves, have been moved 
over the site of the upper operating gates, 
and the erecting of material will advance on 
those gates while the rivetting and calking 
are being completed on the guard gates. The 
leaves of the guard gates are 54 feet 8 inches 
high, and those of the upper operating gates, 
77 feet. 

Under the contract fifty per cent of the 
price of the gates is paid when the material is 
accepted by the Commission's agent in the 
States, and 45 per cent after the gates have 
been erected, and have stood the tests pre- 
scribed. It is probable therefore that the 
tests on the guard gates will be made by the 
contractor as soon as the gates are read}'. 
Most important of these is that for water- 
tightness of the gate leaves. The leaves are so 
constructed that the lower half will be an air 
chamber perfectly water tight, giving so 
much buoyancy, with the lock half full of 
water, that about three-fourths of the weight 
of the gates will be taken up by the water, 
and approximately only one-fourth will be 
borne by the pintle at bottom of leaf and pin 
at top of leaf which is held by a heavy j 
securely anchored in the lock walls. In 
order to overcome the effect of the buoyancy 
when the lock is full of water, which would 
have a tendency to lift the leaves out of 
their sockets, the upper half of the gate will 
fill with water. To this end the downstream 
face of each leaf will be calked water tight, 
but holes will be left in the upper half 
of the upstream fare, so that, as the water 
rises, the upper half will till and act 
w.ight. In making the test for the water- 
tightness of the air chamber.it is proposed to 



fill the chamber with water and then to 
remedy any defects in the calking that may 
become apparent from the test. 



South Guide Wall of Gatun Locks. 

The laying of concrete in the cellular por- 
tion of the upper guide wall at Gatun Locks 
was begun on September 30. The entire wall 
extends into the lake 1 ,500 feet from the upper 
guard gates, and the south or outermost 850 
feet of it are founded on light earth, bed rock 
being about 150 feet below the surface. On 
account of the character of this foundation the 
southern portion is being constructed upon 
piles, driven from 35 to 70 feet into the 
ground, and to make the weight upon them 
as light as possible the wall is being made a 
reinforced concrete cellular structure. 

The wall will be founded on a concrete slab 
from 4 to 5 feet thick laid over the tops of the 
piles, and will be 58 feet wide and 67 feet high 
above the ground, which is at 32 feet above 
sea level, the top therefore being at 14 feet 
above the normal level of the lake. The out- 
side shell will be a reinforced concrete wall 
two feet thick, and within this there will be 
two 18-inch walls running lengthwise of the 
guide wall and 17 feet apart, and 50 walls 18 
inches thick running the width of the guide 
wall at regular intervals of 15 feet. Thus the 
interior will consist of a series of cells 15 by 17 
feet in dimension separated by 18-inch par- 
titions. 

It is estimated that 35,000 cubic yards of 
concrete will be placed in the cellular part of 
the wall, and it is necessary to expedite the 
construction so that it may be completed to 
a height of 23 feet, elevation 55 feet, before 
April, 1912, when the surface of Gatun Lake 
will begin to rise, reaching 55 feet above sea 
level about August, 1912. The chief obstacle 
to rapid progress is placing the forms, as a 
thousand yards of concrete a day could be 
supplied if a place were available to put it in 
place. Both the construction and auxiliary 
mixing plants will be used in supplying the 
concrete. A trestle 850 feet long has been run 
from the west side of the locks alongside the 
site of the guide wall, and cars from the con- 
struction plant will deliver concrete on the 
west side of the wall to be placed by loco- 
motive crane. On the east side concrete will 
be delivered from the auxiliary plant and 
placed by locomotive crane. 



Canal Work in September. 

The grand total of Canal excavation to 
October 1 was 150,723,962 cubic yards, 
leaving to be excavated 44,599,417 cubic 
yards, or less than one-fourth of the entire 
amount for the completed Canal. 

The total for September was 2.538,764 cubic 
yards, as compared with -' 687,088< ubit yards 
in September, 1910, and 2,836,385 cubic yards 
in September, 1909. Practically all the excava- 
tion was "work excavation," there being 



only 7,561 cubic yards of "plant excava- 
tion." 

The dry excavation amounted to 1,566,102 
cubic yards, and was principally by steam 
shovels. The dredges removed 892,373 cubic 
yards, and 80,289 cubic yards were sluiced, in 
addition to the amount pumped into Gatun 
Dam by suction dredges. The progress on 
the locks at Gatun, Pedro Miguel, and Mira- 
flores is referred to elsewhere in this issue. 

In the Atlantic Division, the total excava- 
tion was 498,410 cubic yards. Of this total, 
77,976 cubic yards were dry excavation, and 
the remainder was removed by the dredges 
in the Atlantic entrance. 

The total excavation in the Central Divi- 
sion was 1,361,445 cubic yards, all of which 
was from the prism. The amount taken from 
Culebra Cut was 1,340,173 cubic yards, the 
greatest excavation for any September in the 
history of the Cut. 

In the Pacific Division, the total excavation 
was 678,909 cubic yards, 471, 939 cubic yards 
of which were taken out by the dredges" at 
the Pacific entrance, and 70,289 by the 
hydraulic excavation plant working immedi- 
ately below Miraflores Locks. 

A detailed statement of the excavation, and 
a summary of the work on the locks and 
dams, follow: 

ATLANTIC DIVISION. 



Locality. 


"Work." 

Excava- 

tion. 


"Plant." 
Excava- 
tion. 


Total 
excava- 
tion . 


Dry excavation — 
Locks, Dam and Spill- 


Cu. Yds. 

3 (89 

74.487 


Cu. Yds. 


Cu. Yds. 
3.489 






74.487 








Total.. 


77,976 




77.976 
















420.434 




420.434 


Locks. Dam and Spill- 












Total 


420.434 




420.434 








Total wet and dry 


49S.410 




498.410 









CENTRAL DIVISION. 



D*-y excavation — 
Culebra Cut 


1.340,173 

11.272 

10.000 




1.340.173 
11,272 


Wet excavation— 




10/00 








Total 


1.361.445 




1 361.445 



PACIFIC DIVISION. 



Dry excavation — 
Locks. Dams and Spill- 


99.584 
37.097 




99 584 




::::::::' 




Prism, south of Pedro 












Total 






136,631 






7.S61 




Total 


534.667 
671,348 




542.228 






Total wet and dry 


7.561 


678.909 



TOTAL 


CANAL EXCAVATION. 




Dry excavation .. 
Wet excavation .. 




1.566.102 


"" 7.561 '| 




Total 


2.531.203 


7.561 1 


22338,764 



50 



THE CANAL RECORD 



Vol. V., No. 7. 



NOTES OF PROGRESS. 



{Continued.) 



Mean rainfall along Canal (eleven stations), 6.35 
inches. 

By "Work" excavation is meant excavation actually 
made for one of the constituent parts of the Canal, 
such as prism, diversions, or locks, etc.; that is, it 
represents material taken from the area to be occupied 
by the Canal and constitutes excavation useful for the 
completed Canal. 

By "Plant" excavation is meant excavation outside 
of any of the constituent parts of the Canal, such as 
prism, diversions, or locks, etc. It includes material 
necessary to be excavated for construction purposes 
only, and is chargeable against the particular plant 
item for which it is performed, such as prism, diversions, 
locks, etc. 

DAM AND LOCK CONSTRUCTION. 



Material. 



Concrete laid in locks. 
Concrete laid in dams 

and spillways 

Fill placed in dams . . . 



Atlantic. Pacific 



Cu. Yds, 
57,298 



3.650 
456335 



Cu. Yds. 
71.462 



Total. 



Cu. Yds. 
12S.760 



3,650 

501.276 



Gatun Dam Spillway. 

The concrete work in the Spillway of Gatun 
Dam is about 70 per cent completed, 157,842 
cubic yards, out of a total of 225,000, having 
been placed at the close of work on Octo- 
ber 7. A statement of the amount laid each 
working day last week, and of the total in 
place, follows: 



Date. 


Concrete 
Laid. 


Hours 
worked. 


No. 

Mixers. 




164 
86 
80 
148 
148 
142 


8.00 
4.30 
4.00 
7.00 
7.00 
7.30 


1 




1 




1 




1 




1 




1 






Total 


768 
157,074 


38.00 


1 


Previously reported .... 






157.842 









Porto Bello Crusher. 

A statement of the work done at the Porto 
Bello crusher, by days, for the week ending 
October 7, follows: 



Date. 


Hours 
worked. 


Cubic 
Yards. 




4.13 
5.18 
3.32 
4.01 
4.56 
4.04 










1,454 








1,864 




1.626 






Total 


26.04 


9,792 





Ancon Crusher. 

A statement of rock crushed at the Ancon 
quarry during the week ending October 7, 
follows: 





Date. 


Hours 
worked. 


Cubic 
Yards. 




8.00 
6.40 
7.10 
7.25 
7.55 
7.35 


3,237 
2,717 
2,495 










2,686 
2,835 








Total .... 


44.40 


16,604 





Track Layout in South End of Culebra Cut. 

A long trestle is under construction in the 
south end of Culebra Cut for the purpose of 
making a cross-over to the bottom of the 
incline up which trains may move from all 
parts of the south end to the tracks leading 
to the dumps. This will make it possible to 
construct a new incline on the east side, and 



to complete the excavation on the east side 
of the Cut from Paraiso bridge to Cucaracha. 
When the excavation has advanced to the 
proper point, a retaining wall will be con- 
structed across the front of Paraiso slide. 
When this wall is brought up to the proper 
height a permanent incline with double tracks 
will be constructed outside the prism, and this 



will be used by all trains until the excavation 
in the south end of the Cut is completed. 



The tug Cocoli has received a general over- 
hauling, having had two new feed pumps in- 
stalled, its high-pressure cylinder bored out, 
a new piston fitted, its boiler renovated, and 
its bunkers scaled and painted. 



CONCRETE WORK IN THE LOCKS. 



Over 67 per cent of the concrete for the locks is in place, the amount at the close of 
work on October 7, being 2,827,235 cubic yards, out of a total of approximately 4,199,400. 
A total of 31,064§ cubic yards of concrete was laid in the locks during the week ending 
October 7. 

GATUN LOCKS. 

Over 81.5 per cent of the concrete for the system of three twin locks at Gatun has been 
laid, the amount in place at the close of work on October 7, being 1,635,164 cubic yards, 
out of a total of 2,000,000. A statement of the amount of concrete placed in the locks each 
working day for the week ending October 7, and of the total, follows; and a similar state- 
ment for the work in the spillway of Gatun Dam is published elsewhere in this issue. The 
construction plant works 12 hours daily, and the auxiliary plant 9 hours. 





Construction Plant. 
2-cubic yard mixers. 


Auxiliary Plant. 
2-cubic yard mixers. 


Large 
stone. 


Total. 




Concrete 
placed. 


Hours No. of 
worked. 1 mixers 


Concrete Hours 1 No. of 
placed, worked, mixers 






Cu. Yds. 
848 
1,212 
1,170 
1,316 
1,676 
1,674 


14.36 
24.10 
17.20 
20.58 
25.02 
26.30 


4 
4 
4 
4 
4 
4 


Cu. Yds. 
656 
622 
244 
240 
290 
482 
358$ 


8.40 
8.40 
5.40 
5.40 
5.40 
6.10 


2 
2 
2 
2 
2 
2 


Cu. Yds. 
36 
32 
56 
100 
56 
56 


Cu. Yds. 
1.540 




1.866 




1,470 




1,656 




2,022 




2,212 




358$ 
















Total 


7,896 




4 


2.892$ 




2 


336 


11,124$ 
1. 624.039$ 
























1,635,164 















*The 358$ yards shown for the portable mixers are reinforced concrete, and were placed on the following days: 
October 2nd. 56; October 3rd, 35 J; October 4th, 90; October 5th. 68; October 6th, 67; October 7th, 42. 

PEDRO MIGUEL LOCKS. 

Concrete work in the locks at Pedro Miguel is over 87 per cent completed, 735,440 cubic 
yards, out of a total of 837,400, bucket measurement, having been placed at the close of work 
on October 7. The record for each of the six 8-hour working days of last week, follows: 





Auxiliary Plant. 


Large 
stone. 






Date. 


2-cubic yard mixers. 


$-cubic yard m 


xers. 

No. of 
mixers 


Total. 




Concrete 
placed. 


Hours No. of 
worked. 1 mixers 


Concrete 
placed. 


Hours 
worked . 




October 2 

October 4 


Cu. Yds. 
494 
442 
408 
374 
382 
446 


14.50 
13.50 
12.00 
10.00 
11.00 
13.00 


2 
2 
2 
2 
2 
2 


Cu. Yds. 
330 
290 
257 
364 
417 
582 


21.00 
15.75 
13.75 
17.25 
22.25 
25.25 


3 
3 
3 
3 
4 
4 


Cu. Yds. 


Cu. Yds. 
824 
732 
665 
738 
799 




1,028 


Totals 


2.546 


74.00 


2 


2,240 


115.25 


3.33 


4,411 


4,786 
730.654 


























1 




4,411 


735,440 





















MIRAFLORES LOCKS. 

Over 33.5 per cent of the concrete for the system of two twin locks at Miraflores was 
in place on October 7, the total amount on that date being 456,631 cubic yards, bucket 
measurement, out of a total of approximately 1,362.000. The record for each of the six 8-hour 
working days of last week, follows: 







lant. 
xers. 


Auxiliary Plant. 




Date. 


2-cubic yard mi 


2-cubic yard mixers. 


$-cubic yard muter. 


Total. 




Concrete 

phi! oil 


Hours 
worked. 


No. of 
mixers 


Concrete 
placed. 


Hours 
worked. 


No. of 

mixers 


Concrete 
placed. 


Hours 
worked. 


No. of 
mixers 


Large 
stone. 




Oct. 1 


Cu. Yds. 

12 

1.282 

1,226 

862 

958 

560 

1,240 


.83 
31.67 
30.33 
25.50 
27.50 
14.33 
29.33 


1 
6 
6 
6 
5 
5 
6 


Cu. Yds. 






Cu. Yds. 






Cu. Yds. 


Cu. Yds. 
12 


Oct. 2 

Oct. 3 . . . . 

Oct. 4 

Oct. 5 

Oct. 6 

Oct. 7 


1,304 
980 
1,018 
1.246 
1,262 
1,130 


17.90 
12.90 
13.60 
16.50 
17.00 
16.33 


2 
2 
2 
2 
2 
2 


358 
372 
363 
263 
365 
353 


26.00 
23.50 
23.50 
19.00 
24.00 
23.50 


4 
4 
4 
3 
3 
4 




2,944 
2,578 
2,243 
2,467 
2,187 
2,723 


Total... 
Previously 


6,140 


159.49 


5 


6,940 


94.23 


2 


2,074 


139.50 


3.67 


3,693 


15,154 
441,477 
























Grand 


3,693 


456,631 



October 11, 1911. 



THE CANAL RECORD 



51 



STEAM SHOVEL RECORDS. 



Work In Culebra Cut and on P. R. R. Relocation. 

During the month of September the 
amount of material excavated in the Central 

Division was 1,361,445 cubic yards, of which 
274,914 cubic yards were classified as earth, 
and 1.086,531 cubic yards as rock. Of this 
quantity 1,339,437 cubic yards were removed 
by steam shovels, 736 cubic yards by bucket 
cranes, contractors removed 10,000 cubic 
yards by sluicing, and 11,272 cubic yards by 
hand. 

The high record for the month was made 
by shovel No. 207, working 13 days in the 
Culebra District and 12 days in the Empire 
District, which excavated 47,424 cubic yards 
of rock. The second best record for the month 
was made by shovel No. 231, working 25 days 
in the Culebra District, which excavated 
46,608 cubic yards of rock. 

The best record for a shovel of the seventy- 
ton class was made by shovel No. 109, work- 
ing 24 days in the Culebra District, which 
excavated 36,352 cubic yards of rock and 
earth. 

Shovel No. 254, working in the Culebra 
District, made a high record for one day by 
excavating 3,268 cubic yards of rock on 
September 14. 

Except where noted, monthly reports are 
computed by place measurement, while the 
daily reports are based on car measurement. 
The best records for the month and for one 
day are shown below : 

BEST RECORDS FOR THE MONTH. 
empire district. 

Cubic Yards. 



Shovel 
No. 


Earth. 


Rock. 


Total. 


No. of 
days at 
work. 


229 




37,488 
32.205 
24.998 


37.488 
32.205 
30.862 


25 


227 




25 


215 


5.S64 


25 



CULEBRA DISTRICT. 



230 t I 44.595 44.505 25 

231 i 46.608 1 46,608 25 

254 I I 46.095 | 46,095 23 



PEDRO MIGUEL. 



25,102 25,102 



BEST RECORDS FOR ONE DAY. 



Location. 




258 Empire 

2S2 Empire 

2>i Empire 

25+ Culebra 

230 Culebra 

256, Culebra 

122| Pedro Miguel 



Character of 

material 
excavated. 



Cubic 
yards. 



Sept. 22 
Sept. 28 
Sept. 18 
Sept. 14 
Sept. 25 
Sept. 27 
Sept. 14 



Rock 3.008 

Rock 2,635 



Rock . 
Roek 
Rock. 
Rock. 
Earth . 



2.37 

3.268 
3.141 
2.972 
1.520 



Relocated Line of Panama Railroad. 

The total steam shovel excavation on I he re- 
located line of the Panama railroad amounted 
to 343,770 cubic yards in September. 

The best month's record was made by 
steam shovel No. 262, working on the Monte 
Lirio section, which excavated 10,000 cubic 
yards of earth and 49,500 cubic yards of 
solid rock, a total of 59,500 cubic yards. 

In the 70-ton class, the best month's rec- 
ord was made by steam shovel No. ' 
working on the Monte Lirio section, which 
excavated 37.050 cubic yards of earth. 

The best day's record lor shovels with 5- 
yard dippers was made b) steam shovel No. 
262, working on the Monte Lirio section, 



which excavated 4,100 cubic yards of rock 
on September 21. 

The best day's record for 70-ton shovels 
was made by steam shovel No. 128, working 
on the i latun section, which excavated 1,900 
cubic yards of earth on September 14. 

Month's records are by place measure- 
ment, and day records are by car measure- 
ment. All material was loaded in 10-yard 
dump cars. 

BEST RECORDS FOR THE MONTH. 



o 
V. 


Location. 


Cubic Yards by Cross Section. 


> 
a 


Days 
worked. 


Earth 


Rock. 


Total. 


262 M. Lirio... 

263 Gatun 

128 M. Lirio... 
266 Paraiso . . . 
123iEmpire 


25 
18 
24 
24 
25 


10,000 

37,050 
18.3 
34.235 


49,500 
51,350 

18,300 
2,000 


59,500 
51,350 
37,050 
36.600 
36,235 



BEST RECORDS FOR ONE DAY. 



> 
o 

in 


Location. 


Date. 


Character of 

material 
excavated. 


Cubic 
yards. 




Monte Lirio . 
Gatun 


Sept. 21 
Sept. 13 
Sept. 8 
Sept. 16 
Sept. 14 
Sept. 7 




4,100 


">63 


Rock 


3,440 


>S7 


Rock 


3,410 


266 
1?8 


Earth and rock.. . 


2.400 
1,900 




Rock 


1,860 









Total steam shovel output during the month of 
September, 343.770 cubic yards. 

Total number of steam shovel working days, 237. 
Average output per working day, 1,451 cubic yards. 



Work of the Dredge "Marmot." 

The French ladder dredge Marmot, which 
has been working in the Pacific entrance to 
the canal, has been placed on the gridiron at 
Balboa shops for minor repairs. This is the 
first time the Marmot has been on the grid- 
iron since being placed in commission, in May, 
1909. During that period the dredge has ex- 
cavated 3,309,459 cubic yards of earth and 
rock. The highest record for one month, 
made in December, 1910, was 219,795 cubic 
yards. When the Marmot returns to com- 
mission it will be operated on single shift, 
working only from mean to low tide and from 
low to mean, as the excavation has so far 
advanced that it is impossible for the dredge 
to reach bottom at high tide. By the end of 
October all four of the dredges operating in 
the Pacific channel will be on single shift. 



Excavation at San Pablo and Tabernilla. 
When the steam shovels were working in 
the lake region at San Pablo and Tabernilla 
they could not complete the excavation be- 
cause the canal channel runs across the line 
of the Panama railroad in two places. When 
the present line of the railroad is cut in 
February and trains are running over the 
relocation, these two pieces of excavation 
can be completed, and the Central Division 
is now preparing for this work. Drills will 
begin work this week so that sufficient ma- 
terial may be blasted and broken up be- 
fore the shovels begin to dig. It is ex- 
pected that a shovel will begin operating at 
San Pablo about the first of December, and 
that another will begin on January 1 and 
two others about February 15, making four 
els in all on this job. The work will be 
finished about the end of April. Until after 
the trains begin to run over the relocated line 
the old dumps at San Pablo will be used for 
disposal of the material excavated, and after 
that it will be dumped into the river. River 
dumping is the more economical, but it is not 



thought safe to obstruct the channel until 
after the new line of the tailroad is in use 
and the river assumes its dry season flow. 
About 258,000 cubic yards of rock and earth 
must be dug out tit San Pablo. 

At Tabernilla the material to be removed 
is a part of the right of way of the railroad, 
and work there cannot begin until after the- 
re located line is opened. One shovel will do 
this job, which amounts to about 13,000 
cubic yards. 

Snubbing Posts 
A requisition has been made on the Wash- 
ington office for 585 snubbing posts at which 
ships may tie up in the locks or approaches. 
These posts are to be a lj-inch shell casting 
anchored 6 feet in the masonry' by a lj-inch 
bolt. After they are anchored they will be 
filled with concrete. There are^two types, one 
of which will project 36 inches'above the ma- 
sonry of the lock walls; and the other to pro- 
ject 14 inches. On the approach walls they 
will be from 50 to 60 feet apart and on the 
lock walls will be staggered every 100 feet. 
The large posts will be 26 inches in diameter at 
the base and the small ones 22 inches. 



Work of Unloaders in Central Division. 

The following statement shows the num- 
ber of Lidgerwood cars unloaded by the 
Central Division during the month of Sep- 
tember, 1911: 



Location. 


No. of 
unloaders. 


No. of 
trains. 


No. of 
cars. 




3 
3 

4 


1,019 

762 

1.049 


20,380 




15.240 




22,049 






Total 


10 


2,830 


57,669 



Pacific Division Sand Service. 

A report of sand cars loaded and shipped 
from Balboa during the month of September, 
follows: 



Destination. 


Number 
Cars. 


Cubic 
Yards. 




2,429 

33 

16 

4 

7 

6 

37 


38.099 
495 




378 




100 




175 
150 




600 







Total 2,532 39,997 



Work on the Dumps. 

Material from the Culebra Section of the 
Central Division was disposed of on the 
dumps at Miraflores and Balboa during the 
months of September, 1910, and September, 
1911, as follows: 



Disposition and Mode. 



Balboa and vicinity, Lidgerwood 

trains 

Balboa and vicinity, Western Dump 

trains 

Miraflores and vicinity. Lidgerwood 

trains 

Mirallon-s and vicinity, Western 

dump trains 



Total Lidgerwood trains 

Total. Western dump trains. 
Lrdage. cubic yards. . 



1020 

99 

769 

3 



1.789 

1112 

712.820 



1910 



998 

68 

750 

8 



1.748 
76 

672.170 



It will lie seen that an average of 75 trains 
of material per day, aggregating 28,512.8 
cubic yards per day, were disposed of on the 
Miraflores and Balboa dumps. 



The New United Methodist Church at 
Pedro Miguel will be dedicated on October 
22. 



52 



THE CANAL RECORD 



Vol. V., No. 7. 



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October 11, 1911. 



THE CANAL RECORD 



S3 



FENDERS FOR LOCK APPROACH 
WALLS. 

Method of Distributing Force of Blow Caused by 
Ships Bumping Walls. 

Ships passing through the locks will ap- 
proach under their own steam, and will anchor 
until the towing locomotives can take them 
in tow for passage through the locks. The 
approach is formed between a section of the 
center wall, extending into the canal from 
1,445 to 1,7110 [eel from the first gate, and flare 
or wing walls, which are a continuation of 
the side walls. These walls will be fitted with 
wooden fenders composed of 12 by 16 inch 
stringers running longitudinally along the 
sides, bearing every 5 feet against a casting 
supported by a nest of four springs. The 
sketches printed herewith show the location 
of the fenders on the walls, and the method 
of suspending them so that they will bear up- 
on the springs. The purpose of the fenders 




SECTION OF LOCK WALL SHOWING PARALLEL LINES OF 
BUFFERS. 

is to take the stress caused by a ship bumping 
against the walls. 

A requisition has been made on the Wash- 
ington office, and bids will presently be re- 
quested, for the following materials to be used 
in the fenders: 2,172 timber bolts, li inches 
in diameter, with nut, 32,580 pounds; 2,1 72 two 
link chains for hangers, 21,720 pounds; 2,200 
special links for hangers, 11,000 pounds; 762 
bronze sleeves for hangers, 3,505 pounds; 762 
eyes for hangers, 6,858 pounds; 762 anchor 
rods for hangers, 13,716 pounds; 25,608 
helical springs, 640,200 pounds; 2.16S washers 
(top), 34,688 pounds; 2,168 washers (stand- 
ard), 13,008 pound-. 

In addition to these materials there will lie 
required the following: 6,394 buffer castings, 
1,381,104 pounds; 6,394 movable buffer 
castings. 1.278,800 pounds; 2,168 
blocks, 28,624 pounds; 51,152 bolts, 89,510 
pounds; 12,788 plates. 60,104 pounds; 31,659 
feet of buffers. The castings and bearing 
blocks will be made at Gorgona foundry. 

The cups in which the springs arc nested 
are anchored into the concrete of the walls 
by means of a flange on the top and bottom. 
These castings are 17J inches long, 14^ inches 
wide, and Hi inches deep, and weigh 216 
pounds each. The movable buffet casting, 



which acts as a cap for the springs, is 16 inchc a 
long,12£ inches wide and 10| inches deep. 

The springs an to be made of carbon or 
chrome vanadium spring steel, will be 12] 
inches long when free, 9 -J- inches when loaded, 
3-1/16 inches inside, and 4 inches outside 
diameter, and must be capable ol being com- 
pressed not less than 3 nor more than 3 J inch- 
es under a load of 7,500 pounds. 

The stringers will hang by 3 links from eyes 
on the ends of steel anchor bolts, 1 '. inches in 
diameter, embedded in the concrete 2 feet 5| 
inches. Thus, free movement will be pro- 
cured. The nests of springs will be spaced 



along the walls at 5-foot intervals, and the 
hangers for the wooden fenders will be at 
intervals of 15 feet. Each hanger bolt will 
splice two stringers so that each row of fend- 
ers will be a continuous line of stringers. 
The shortest of these will In- on the upper 
approach wall at Gatun, 970 feet, and the 
longest on the lower approach wall at Gatun, 
1,202 feet. There will be in all the locks 48 
rows of buffers — double rows on each side of 
six middle approach walls, and on ten of the 
side or wing walls, and one row on the side 
wing walls at the upper end of Miraflores 
and Pedro Miguel locks. 



•■.-'■■ 
. 

f 



,--_■■■■ 

■ % 



*S:Mj& 




m- 



&:*''• 






SECTION THROUGH NEST OF SPRINGS. SHOWING CUPS IN WHICH SPRINGS ARK HELP. ANP ALSO METHOP OF HANGING 

BUFFERS UPON THE WALL . 



Docks at Pacific Entrance. 

Work on the new concrete dot k at Balboa, 
which is to be part of the permanent harbor 
improvements, has so far advanced that 30 oi 
the 50 concrete caissons have been sunk to 
rock; 47 of the caissons are under way, leav- 
ing only 3 to set. Eighteen have been tilled 
with concrete and on them the lower tie gir- 
ders are now being placed. The average depth 
of the caissons is about 60 feet below mean 
tide level, the maximum being 62 feet and the 
minimum 58. 

Great difficulty has been experienced at 
times in forcing the caissons down through the 
argillaceous earth. Laborers within the con- 
crete cylinder remove the earth beneath it, 
sending it up in buckets hoisted by a donkey 
engine; but the lateral pressure from the out- 



side prevented , in one case, the passage of the 
cylinder, even under a pressure of 40 tons in 
addition to its own weight. The earth was 
loosened by a system of high-pressure jets of 
water forced down the outside of the cylinder. 
It is expected that work on the superstruct- 
ure of the dock will begin not later than the 
first of November. So far, though such work 
is notably hazardous, only one man has been 
killed. He was a silver employe who, in at- 
tempting at night to cross one of the pits in 
a manner unauthorized, fell to the bottom. 

The highway a1 Pedro Miguel, along the foot 
ol the embankment upon which the relocated 
line of the Panama railroad runs, willbe closed 
for about a month while rock is being dumped 
along the face of the embankment to make a 
toe that will prevent further sliding. 



54 



THE CANAL RECORD 



Vol. V., No. 7. 



EXECUTIVE ORDER. 



Associate Justice of the Supreme Court. 

Under authority vested in me by law, and 
until otherwise provided by law or ordered, 
William H. Jackson is appointed an As- 
sociate Justice of the Supreme Court of the 
Canal Zone at a salary of six thousand dol- 
lars per annum, effective the day he enters on 
the duties of the office. 

Wm. H. Taft. 
The White House, 
September 21, 1911. 

[No. 1413.] 



Attendance at Canal Zone Schools 

The Canal Zone schools opened for the ses- 
sion of 1911-1912 on October 2. The total en- 
rollment of white children for the first week 
was 1,004, which is only 18 less than the total 
net white enrollment for the entire session of 
1910-1911. 

Six hundred and fifty-four colored and native 
children were enrolled. This does not include 
two new schools, which will open at Ancon 
and Mandingo within the next few weeks, 
with an attendance, respectively, of about 130 
and 30. In addition to these, new schools for 
colored and native children were opened at 
Miraflores, Cucaracha and Marajahl. A new 
school building was up at Mount Hope 
during the vacation period. The total enroll- 
ment in this division during the opening week 
last year was about 600. 

Inasmuch as the attendance during the 
first weeks is, as a rule, noticeably less than 
for the remainder of the session, the total en- 
rollment of 1,658 for the first week indicates 
that the attendance this session will be the 
largest yet attained by the schools of the Zone. 
The children are instructed by 43 white and 
25 colored teachers. 

A list of the schools, with the enrollment 
for the first week at each place of white, 
colored and native children, follows: 



Location-. 


White. 


Colored. 


Pedro Miguel 

Paraiso 

Cucaracha 


169 

63 

22 

55 

184 

31 

23 

131 
162 


Not open yet. 
22 
28 
50 
22 
121 




97 
Not open yet. 

20 


Matachin 

Gorgona 


31 
40 
52 




23 


Marajahl 


164 
1.004 


34 

114 


Total 


654 



All steerage passengers brought from or em- 
barking at ports where cholera prevails, es- 
pecially those from Marseilles and Genoa, 
are held in quarantine upon arrival in Colon 
a sufficient length of time to determine by bac- 
teriological examination whether they are 
carriers of the cholera bacillus. 



Society of the Chagres. 

The first general meeting of the Society of 
the Chagres, held at the Strangers' Club 
Colon, Saturday the 7th instant, was attended 
by more than one hundred members. The 
constitution was ratified with certain minor 
amendments, and the following officers were 
elected to serve until the annual meeting in 
January: Col. W. C. Gorgas, President; Dr. 
Lloyd Noland, Vice President : Mr. C. A. Mc- 
Ilvaine, Secretary-Treasurer; Capt. R. E. 
Wood, Mr. John Burke, Mr. John J. Meehan 



and Mr. John K. Baxter, members of the ex- 
ecutive committee. A sample pin manu- 
factured by Tiffany was exhibited at the 
meeting. The pin engraved with a member's 
name and the date of his arrival on the Isth- 
mus will cost S3. 00. An order will be placed 
at once for pins for the 207 charter members 
of the Society now enrolled. 



COMMISSION CLUBHOUSES. 



PER3DMAL. 



Major Chester Harding, with his wife and 
daughter, is r. turning from his annual va- 
cation leave in the States on the Cristobal. 
which is due to arrive on October 12 

Dr. J. C. Perry sailed on the Mexico for 
Chile on October 9, to attend the Interna- 
tional Sanitation Conference to be held at 
Santiago. 



Cranes at Balboa Docks. 

The first of the eight 4-ton electric cargo- 
handling cranes for the "steel pier" at Balboa, 
contract for which was awarded the Maine 
Electric Company early in July, is expected to 
arrive at the port shortly. The first two to 
arrive will be placed at the southern end of the 
pier, immediately north of the derrick used 
for heavy cargo. Preparation for the new and 
heavier cranes has been made by reenforcing 
the girders at the southern end and laying a 
concrete floor, 12 inches thick, in which are 
embedded steel rails for the crane runway. 
The four-foot sill on the outer side of the pier, 
which forms the runway for the present H-ton 
cranes, has been removed at this point. This 
levelling will expedite the work of loading and 
unloading, especially at low tide. 



Rodmen and Levelmen. 

An examination to test the fitness of rod- 
men and levelmen for promotion will be held 
at Culebra on Sunday, October 29. Em- 
ployes wishing to enter this examination 
should forward their applications through 
the head of the department or division in 
which they are serving to Mr. A. B. Nichols, 
chairman of the examining board, Culebra. 



Copies of the Annual Report. 

Employes of the Isthmian Canal Commis- 
sion or Panama Railroad Company desiring 
copies of the Annual Report of the Commis- 
sion for the fiscal year 1910-1911 should se- 
cure application blanks from the head of their 
department or division. 



Masonic 

The Masonic Club of Empire will enter- 
tain the Gorgona and Las Cascadas Masonic 
clubs at its next meeting, Wednesday evening, 
October 18. Special train service will be pro- 
vided to leave Gorgona for Empire at 7 
o'clock and returning will leave Empire at 
11'.30 o'clock. 



I. B. of S. S. and D. M. 
Local No. 19, International Brotherhood 
of Steam Shovel and Dredge Men, will hold 
its regular monthly meeting on Sunday, 
October 15, at the Empire lodge hall at 12.15 
p. m. 



Balboa Lodge No. 4, Knights of Pythias 
of Las Cascadas, will exemplify the rank of 
Knight on four candidates on Monday even- 
ing, October 16, 1911. All Pythiansin good 
standing are invited to attend. 



Activities of the Young Men's Christian Associ- 
ation. 

The standing of bowling teams in the league series 
on October 7, was as follows: 
Team. Played. Won. Lost. P. C. 

Empire 36 27 9 .750 

Cristobal 36 23 13 .638 

Gatun 36 19 17 .528 

Gorgona 36 19 17 .528 

Marines 36 16 20 .444 

Culebra 36 4 32 .111 

The moving picture schedule for the week October 
16 to 21 is as follows: Cristobal, Monday; Gorgona , 
Tuesday; Gatun, Wednesday; Empire, Thursday; 
Culebra, Friday; Corozal, Saturday. 

The standing of temas in the Isthmian Basket Ball 
League on October 7. was as follows: 

Team. Won. Lost. P. C. 

Cristobal 1 1.000 

Gorgona 1 1 . 000 

Culebra 1 1 000 

Gatun 1 .000 

Empire 1 .000 

Corozal 1 .000 

The results of the games on October 7, were: 
Cristobal 23; Gatun 12, at Gatun. 
Culebra 24; Empire 8, at Culebra. 
Gorgona 30; Corozal 10, at Corozal. 
The games to be played on October 14, are: 
Cristobal at Empire. 
Gatun at Gorgona. 
Corozal at Culebra. 

CULEBRA. 

The Married Men took four games from the Inde- 
pendents at volley ball on Tuesday evening. The Mar- 
ried Men have hnished their games, having won two 
and lost two. 

The Cristobal bowling team took three games from 
the Culebra team at Culebra on Saturday evening, the 
following being the line-up and scores : 

Culebra. Cristobal. 

Baumer 164 176 131 Wheeler 161 133 170 

Crain 154 163 143 Blackburn.. 195 191 166 

Dundas.... 154 192 162 Collins 167 191 176 

Driscoll.... 140 188 17S Bullard 1S3 187 176 

Herrmgton. .126 161 181 Louch 190 209 152 



Total 738 880 795 912 910 840 

The brst game of basket ball of the Isthmian league 
between Culebra and Empire was played on Saturday 
evening at Culebra with the following line-up and 
score: Culebra 24, Empire 8. 

, Empire. Culebra. 

King Kaperski 

Koperski. R Bartlett, F 

Adams Bartlett, E 

King, B Barcroft 

Giovalli Wilmot 

Chapman 
Hepier 
The following high scores were rolled during the week. 
Big Pins — Case 207, 200; Duckpins — Fox 100, 104, 
107; Mcllvaine 104; Case 106. 

EMPIRE. 

The following high scores were bowled during the 
week; Ten Pins — Parkis 204, 214, 202, 210, 204; 
Rodeigheiro 220; Gustaveson 201, 202; Giavolli 220; 
Huson 204; Snyder 207. Duckpins — Pulsifer 108; 
Grund 104, 105; McLeod 101; Marshall 110; Rod- 
eigheiro 104. Pinney 105; H. King 103, 101; Dakin 102. 

The league games bowled on Empire alleys on Sat- 
urday night, October 7, resulted as follows: 

Empire. Gatun. 

Gust 'son... 161 169 191 O'Meara... 139 141 164 

Spinks 155 156 181 Chamb'lain. 176 154 152 

Gorham 184 154 134 Galloway... 165 148 152 

Pearson 189 178 179 Severn 179 151 139 

Huson 158 182 180 Barte 141 165 166 



Total.... 847 839 865 800 759 755 

On Saturday night. October 14, Cristobal will bowl 
on the Empire alleys in the league series. 

The Cristobal basket ball team will play the Empire 
team on the 14th, at Empire. This is the first game of 
the league to be played at Empire and a lively contest 
is assured. 

At the meeting of the Literary and Debating Society 
held on Friday, October 6, Dr. Orenstein of Panama 
gave a talk on "National Vitality," A general discus- 
sion followed. The next weekly meeting will be held 
on Friday, October 13. 

Twelve men have entered the billiard tournament 
which started on Monday, October 9. 

GORGONA. 

Gynasium class, which has been held on Monday and' 
Thursday nights, has been discontinued, and those 
nights will be given over to basket ball practice, pre- 
ceded by calisthenics. 

The local team took three games at bowling from 



October 11, 191 1. 



THE CANAL RECORD 



55 



Camp Elliot on Saturday night, on the local alleys. 
The scores were as follows: 



OFFICIAL CIRCULARS. 



Camp Elliot. 

McDowell.. 161 125 128 

Wright I.M 11" 

M irtins 136 1-'" 

Austin 148 159 K" 

Clouse 154 128 

Caltado.... 139 138 



Gorgona. 
M. Van . 200 170 188 
R, Van 16' 145 110 

... US US 1 1.' 

Sexton 157 186 212 

rty... 170 136 178 



Total 730 671 673 837 785 830 

Seventy-five people attended the song service on 
Sunday night. Mrs. Shady played the piano, and 
Ernest Reinhold the violin. 

The following nun are entered to date in the local 
billiard tournament, which will start October 16: 
Geo. W. Strong, R. A. Montgovery. Win. Ashman. Dr. 
C. A. Funk. Thos. Ryan. Thos. Bailey, H. Berman and 
C. A. Sims. A cue will 1"' awarded the winner. 
GATUN. 

The Gatun-Cristobal basketball game was played 
on Friday night. October 6, instead of October 7, as 
scheduled. The line-up's were; 

Gatun. Cristobal. 

Wilson R. F Luce 

Whiston L.F Sarter 

Sherrard. Wright C Weller 

Brown. Minotti L. G Swallenberg 

Fitzpatrick. Mitchell. . . R. G Stemer 

Score — Cristobal. 23, Gatun, 12. 
Joseph Mitchell has been elected Captain and Fred 
Huber . Manager of the basket ball team. 

Gold and silver medals will be given as prizes for 
three-cushion billiard and class A and B pool tourna- 
ments now being held. The man making the highest 
single run in pool will receive a cue. 

Gatun lost two games out of three on Saturday, Oc- 
tober 7, in a match game of bowling with Empire on the 
local alleys. 

The "Daily News" is the newest feature at the Club 
House. It consists of a large card board bulletin an- 
nouncing in brief form the latest and most important 
foreign and local news items. 

CRISTOBAL 

The Literary and Debating Club held an open meet- 
ing on Wednesday night, the program being in the 
form of a political convention. It was interspersed 
with the singing of patriotic songs by the audience, and 
songs by a quartette from Corozal. Presidential nom- 
inations were made as follows: Insurgent party. Sen. 
La Follette. by E. D. Nelson; Democratic party. 
Woodrow Wilson, by C. H. Elliott; Suffragette party. 
Laura Jean Libby. by C. J. Dinnan; Republican party. 
W. H. Taft for re-nomination, by C. P. O'Neal. 
After nomination speeches, a ballot was taken by the 
audience, resulting as follows: Woodrow Wilson. 57; 
W. H. Taft. 55; La Follette, 26; Laura Jean Libby, 5; 
Attendance, 214. 

The program for the meeting of October 18 will 
include an address on "The Installation and Operation 
of Lock Machinery." by Lewis Mason. 

The Ten Pin Bowling League games on Saturday 
night resulted in Cristobal's taking two out of three 
games from Culebra by the following scores: 

Cristobal. Culebra. 

Barrett 201 179 190 Hostetter. . . 122 144 166 



Gibson 193 ISO 146 

Rosteck 149 142 

Thomas I 00 

Furlong.... 157 134 200 

Burns. T. .. 197 lf,l Is.? 



Mengel 187 195 186 

Fay 176 176 174 

Warner. ... 155 138 150 

Case 149 203 168 



Total. 



897 796 918 



789 836 834 



Stages of the Chagres. 

Maximum heights of the Chasres River for the week 
ending midnight. Saturday. October 7. 1911. All 
heights are in feet above mean sea level. 





Station. 


Day and Date. 


Vigia. 


a 

V 

3 

'a 
< 


a 
o 

£1 

£ 

o 


6 

o 

a 


c . 

65 


Sun., Oct. 1 

Mon.. Oct. 2. . . 
Tues.. Oct. 3... 
Wed.. Oct. 4. 
Thurs.Oct.5. . 
Fri.. Oct. 6 . . . . 

Sat.. Oct. 7.... 


128.9 
130.5 
128.9 
127.6 
126.6 
127.4 
128.2 


94 9 
95.8 
95.0 
94 5 

93 2 
93.6 

'It 2 


49 
48 . 9 
49.8 

49.8 
46 5 
46.5 
46 6 


15.8 
16.0 
16.2 
16.9 
16 4 
16.3 
16.3 


15.6 
15.6 
15.7 
16.1 
16.0 
16.0 
16.0 


Height of low- 
water 


125 


92 


41 " 



















Band Concert. 

A concert will be given by the Isthmian Canal Cora- 
mission Band at Cristobal, C. Z., on Sunday, October 
15. 1911. at 4.30 p. m. 

The next concert will be given at Culebra, C. Z.. on 
October 22, at 5.45 p. m. 



1911. 



Superintendent of Clubhouses. 
Culebra. C. Z., September 23, 
Circular No. 412: 

Effective litis date, Mr. Alfred H. Dickson is ap- 
pointed Superintendent of Clubhouses, vice Mr. Floyd 
C. Freeman, resigned. 

Geo. W. Goethals. 

Chairman. 



Loss of Locomotive Tools and Oiling Equipment. 

Culebra. C.Z.. September 28, 1911. 
Circular No. 41 1 : 

My attention has been invited to the frequent loss 
of locomotive tools and oiling equipment, resulting, 
in most cases, from the failure of engineers to see that 
tools and oil boxes are properly locked before they leave 
their engines. 

Boxes and chains with locks for securing tools, etc., 
being provided on each locomotive, the loss of such 
equipment from this cause is inexcusable, and any such 
loss will, in the future, subject the engineer responsible 
to discipline. 

Locomotive engineers will be expected to see that 
their engines are provided with a sufficient number of 
locks and boxes to insure the proper safeguarding of 
this equipment, and in any case in which locks or boxes 
have been broken and the equipment removed, they 
will be expected to report the same promptly to 
the foreman of the engine house where engine is tied 
up when not working, who shall, in turn, report the 
facts to the yardmaster. 

Hostlers handling engines at the different points will 
be required to make personal inspection of all engines 
immediately upon reporting for duty and to report to 
the foreman of the engine house any infraction of this 
order. 

In order to assist in the identification of locomotive 
tools, etc., all such equipment will be numbered by the 
Mechanical Division with the number of the locomotive 
to which the same belongs. This numbering will be per- 
formed at the different houses upon the delivery of the 
equipment there by the different divisions concerned. 
Geo. W. Goethals, 
Chairman, Isthmian Canal Commission, 
President, Panama Railroad Company. 



Hiring of Gold Employes. 

Culebra. C. Z, October 9. 191 1. 
Circular No. 262-f. 

Circular No. 262-E is hereby amended by the ad- 
dition of the following paragraph: 

13. Hiring of Gold Employes on Isthmus — 
No person will be employed on the Isthmus on the 
gold roll in any shop without the prior approval 
of the Inspector of Shops. 

Geo. W. Goethals. 
Chairman, Isthmian Canal Commission. 
President, Panama Railroad Company. 



Laborers' Clearance and Identification. 

Culebra. C. Z., September 27, 1911. 
Circular No. 229-u: 

Effective October 1, 1911, laborers entering the ser- 
vice on the hourly silver roll will be required to serve at 
least three months at the rate of pay below that of the 
gang to which they are assigned, unless such new em- 
ployea furnish a clearance showing that their previous 
service was terminated on account of lack of work or 
reduction of force, this clearance to be attached to an 
identification certificate (Form X-143) properly made 
out. 

The possession of a contract check will not entitle the 
holder to any special privileges unless he can ?ntis- 
factorily prove as above provided or by other evidence 
that the contract was not forfeited due to the fault or 
volition of the laborer. 

These instructions apply to both European and 



colored laborers, except when assigned to gangs paid 
the minimum rate of ten cents per hour. 

Geo. W. Gobi b 
Chairman and Chief Engineer. 



Rainfall from October 1 to 7. 1911, Inclusive. 



Stations. 



Pacific Section 

Ancon 

Balboa 

♦Mtraflores 

Pedro Miguel . 

Rio Grande 

Central Section — 

Culebra 

♦Camacho 

Empire 

Gamboa 

*Juan Mina . . . . 

Alhajuela 

*E1 Vigia 

*Gorgona 

San Pablo 

Tabernilla 

Bohio 

*Monte Lirio . . . 
Atlantic Section — 

Gatun 

*Brazos Brook . , 

Cristobal 

Porto Bello 



I' 

.5 aj 

rt o 



Ins. 
0.33 

40 

1 HI 

1 Iv 

2 i4 

2 (.4 
2 91 

2.15 
1.46 

1 115 

I 75 
1.50 
0.79 

47 

II i,". 

1 41 

2 09 

1.19 
0.67 
49 
2.67 



.?.i 



Ins. 

55 
0.69 

1 42 
' l(, 

6.70 

7.25 
8.52 
6 47 

1 17 

2 42 



3 67 
1.80 
0.70 

; i 97 



♦Standard rain gage — readings at 5 p. m. daily. 
Automatic rain gage at unstarred stations — values 
midnight to midnight. |To 5 p. m., October 6. 



September Rainfall for Three Years. 



Station. 




Pacific Seclion- 

Ancon 

Balboa 

Miratlores .... 
Pedro Miguel. 
Rio Grande. . . 
Central Section- 

Culebra 

Camacho 

Empire 

Gamboa 

Alhaiuela 

El Vigia 

Gorgona 

San Pablo 

Tabernilla .... 

Bohio 

Trinidad 

Monte Lirio . . 
Atlantic Scc- 

Gatun 

Brazos Brook . 

Cristobal 

Porto Bello. . . 
Nombre de D. 



8.77 
11.20 
17.53 
17.47 
18.52 



15.55 
14.82 
19.31 
8.70 
18.17 



1910 


1911 


« 

> 

< 

C 

,o 


t: 

o 
u 

V 

« 

"o 
w 

S 
> 


8.86 


6.03 


7.39 


IS 


9.98 


8.66 


6.54 


13 


13. 10 


8.30 


9.90 


4 


1 < 42 


8.31 


8.44 


4 


14.72 


6 63 


10.62 


7 


13 51 


5.97 


11.09 


23 


17.20 


97 


10.60 


6 


12 57 


5.46 


7 . 62 


7 


i ! 'HI 


5.20 


IU 42 


29 


15.37 


9.29 


11 79 


13 


K, i;ii 


7.64 


13.45 


4 


13.33 


I, 41 


12.42 


8 


16.88 


3.82 


10.94 


5 


14.72 


4.47 


12 42 


5 


14.53 


5 . 20 


13.53 


18 


16.30 


7 . 03 


12.41 


4 


16 •»> 


1 1. 19 


12. 79 


4 


16.02 


4.33 


9.97 


7 


12.22 


111.. 52 


11.98 


6 


15.65 


11 . 62 


12.54 


42 


9.54 


17.55 


13.32 


4 


i (,\ 


12.29 


8 97 


3 



1 1 

14 
16 
19 
20 

20 
20 
21 
19 
20 
20 
17 
21 
25 
24 
19 
27 

22 
25 

24 

2! 
2'< 



Tide Table. 

The following tabK' shows the time of high 
tides at Panama for the week ending Octobei 18, 1911 

(75th meridian time): 



Date. 


Low. 


nigh. 


Low. 


High. 


Low. 




A.M. 


A.M. 


P.M. 


P.M. 


P.M. 


October 12 


12.00 






6.30 




October 13 


12 47 


(, 50 


1.15 


20 




October 14 . . . . 


1.35 


7 40 


2. 10 


8.15 




October 15 


2.35 


8.55 


3 in 


9 20 




October 16 


3.50 


9 50 


4 20 


10.40 






5.10 


11 15 


5 40 










12 40 


6 50 









WEATHER CONDITIONS. CANAL ZONE. SEPTEMBER, 1911 







Temperature. 






Precipitation 


■ 


Wind. 




























8}_ 

Z f 

2- 






Stations 






- 
5 




5 






| 


u 

a 

- ij 


L > 

■5 £ 


1. 

o — ~ 




5 






i o_g 


i 






.- 


a 


I = 
a/ JZ 




3 a 


is 






K.- 


ai 






a- 


• i • 


S 

90 

'1 
93 


a 

13 


a 

72 

7.1 





r- 

86 
92 
91 


' H 


I 


y, 




a. 






N.1-: 
N E 
N.E. 


a 




29.S22 


1 1162 
5.97 




20 




N. 

N \V 

N.W. 


n 




.hi 


Aucou . 


22 



56 



THE CANAL RECORD 



Vol. V., No. 7. 



COMMISSARY DEPARTMENT. 

The commissaries are open during the following 
hours: 

Cristobal, 8 a. m. to 12.30 p. m., and 2 to 7 p. m. 
Balboa, 8 a. m. to 12.30 p. m., and 2.30 to 7 p. m. 
Ancon, 8 a. m. to 1 p. m., and 3 to 6 p. m. 
All others, 8 a. m. to 1 p. m., and 3 to 7 p. m. 

Retail prices of cold storage provisions for the week 
beginning October 11, 1911. 

fresh meats. Price. 

Mutton — Stewing, per pound 6 

Shoulder, neck trimmed off, (4 pounds 

and over) . per pound 9 

Entire forequarter (not trimmed), 10 

pounds and over, per pound 8 

Leg (8 to 10 pounds), per pound 17 

Cutlets, per pound * 18 

Short cut chops, per pound 20 

Lamb — Stewing, per pound 6 

Entire forequarter, neck trimmed off, 

per pound 9 

Leg (5 to 8 pounds) , per pound 20 

Chops, per pound 24 

Cutlets, per pound 24 

Veal — Stewing, per pound 10 

Shoulder, for roasting (not under 4 

pounds), per pound 12$ 

Chops, shoulder, per pound 16 

Chops, per pound 24 

Loin, for roasting, per pound 24 

Cutlets, per pound 28 

Pork — Loin chops or roast, per pound 18 

Beef — Suet, per pound 2 

Soup, per pound 5 

Stew, per pound 8 

Corned, No. 1, per pound 12 

Corned , No. 2 , per pound 10 

Chuck roast (3 pounds and over), per 

pound 12 

Pot roast, per pound 12 J 

Rib roast, second cut (not under 3 j 

pounds) , per pound 16 

Rib roast, first cut (not under 3 pounds), 

per pound 18 

Sirloin roast, per pound 19 

Rump roast, per pound 19 

Porterhouse roast, per pound 20 

Steak, chuck, per pound 12 j 

Round, per pound 13 

Rib, per pound 18 

Sirloin, per pound 19 

Rump, per pound 19 

Porterhouse (not less than ij 

pounds), per pound 20 

Tenderloin (Western), per pound. 24 

MISCELLANEOUS. 

Caviare, Russian, per tin 47, 89 

Livers — Beef, per pound 7 

Calf, each 60 

Half, each 30 

Steak, Hamburger, pkg 13 

Sausage — Bologna, per pound 10 

Frankfurter, per pound 12 

Lieberwurst. per pound 10 

Devonshire Farm, per pound 17 

Sweetbread — Veal, per pound 1 . 20 

Beef, per pound 25 

Eggs, fresh, dozen t30 

one-half dozen only fl6 

Bluefish, fresh, per pound 14 

Halibut, fresh, per pound 15 

Shads, fresh, each 70 

Shad roes, fresh, per pair 35 

POULTRY AND GAME. 

Chickens — Fancy roasting, milk fed, large, each 1.25 

Fancy roasting, milk fed, med., each 1.00 
Fancy roasting, corn fed, about 4£ 

pounds, each 90 

Fowls, each 60, 70, 80, 90, 1.00 

Ducks, Western, about 4J pounds, each 1 .00 

Broilers, milk fed, each 60 

corn fed , each 55 

Turkeys, per pound 26 

Squabs, each 35 

Capons, each 2.10 

Fryers, corn fed, each 60 

Partridges, each 50 

Grouse, each 50 

CURED AND PICKLED MEATS. 

Ham — German. Westphalia, per pound *. . 36 

Sugar cured, per pound 20 

Sliced, per pound 22 

Half, for boiling, per pound 2 1 

Boiled, per pound t28 

Hocks, per pound J8 

Todd's Smithfield Virginia, per pound . . 30 

Bacon — Breakfast, whole piece, per pound 23 

Breakfast, sliced, per pound 24 

Pork, salt family, per pound 13 

Ox tongues, each 1 . 00 

Pigs' feet, per pound 9 

Tongues, per pound 18 

Sliced bacon in 1-pound tins, per tin 30 

In 1-pound jars, per jar 30 

DAIRY PRODUCTS. 

Butter — Creamery special, per pound 32 

Cheese — Roquefort, per pound 38 

Philadelphia cream, cake 10 

Philadelphia cream, cuke 18 

Young America, per pound *20 

Swiss, per pound 26 

Edam, each 1 . 00 



Price. 

Neufchatel, cake 6 

Gouda, per pound 34 

Milk (Certified), per bottle **25 

Buttermilk, bottle **15 

Fer-mil-lac, bottle **25 

Ice cream, quart J25 

^-gallon J50 

VEGETABLES AND FRUITS. 

Beets, per pound 3 

Celery, per head 6 

Cabbage, per pound 4 

Cucumbers, per pound 4 

Carrots, per pound 3 

Cauliflower, per pound *07 

Lettuce, per pound *12 

Onions, per pound 3J 

Potatoes, white, per pound *3 

sweet, per pound 2 

Pears, alligator, each 6 

Parsnips, per pound 4 

Romaine, per pound fl5 

Turnips, per pound 3 

Tomatoes, per pound f6 

Yams, per pound 3 

Apples, per pound *5 

Cantaloupes, each 8 

Grapes, per pound 8 

Grape Fruit, each 4 

Lemons, dozen 24 

Limes, per 100 80 

Oranges, California, per dozen 36 

Oranges, per dozen *12 

Peaches, pound 8 

Plums, per pound 10 

Pears, per pound *6 

*Indicates reduction from last list. 
**Indicates 5 cents allowed for return of bottle, 
tlndicates advance on last list. 

ISold only from commissaries; no orders taken for 
delivery 

Supplies for the Canal. 

The following steamers, with supplies for the Isth- 
mian Canal Commission, arrived at the ports of Cris- 
tobal. Colon and Balboa during the week ending 
October 7: 

PrinzAug. Wilhclm, October 2, from New York, with 
38 cases picks, 15 cases lanterns, 50 bundles wire, 235 
cases blasting caps, for stock; 13 cases machinery, for 
Atlantic Division. 

Acapulco, October 3, from San Francisco, with 13 
crates stovepipe elbows, for stock. 

Abangarez, October 5, from New Orleans, with 35 
pieces piling for Atlantic Division; 10 pieces piling, 
5452 pieces yellow pine lumber, 15 rolls cotton duck, 
1 90 bales rice straw, 9 1 1 bales hay for stock ; 377 pieces 
white oak lumber. 2,031 pieces yellow pine lumber, for 
Mechanical Division; 12 crates concrete mixers, for 
Pacific Division; 6 crates concrete mixers, for Panama 
Railroad Company. 

Santa Marta, October 5, from New York, with 25 
coils rope, 25 cases fuse. 32 cases rubber hose, 427 drums 
kerosene, for stock. 

Panama, October 5, from New York, with 18 cases 
insulated wire, 8 pieces lumber. 120 pieces switches. 45 
pieces railroad frogs, 7 cases switch fittings, 136 barrels 
caustic soda, 24 bales rubber hose, 160 coils rope, 91 
kegs galvanized iron spikes. 100 cases varnish. 28 cases 
picks. 75 cases sal-soda. 10 kegs lump chalk, 40 cases 
metal polish, 14 cases copper tacks, 53 cases air brake 
material, 27 cases ink. 9 cases mucilage, 9 cases milk 
cans, 400 cases washing powder, 25 bundles scythe 
snaths, 8 drums zinc, 20 cases car seals, for stock; 395 
barrels sand, 37 crates fire brick, 93 cases brake shoes, 
9 barrels crucibles, 73 packages locomotive cranes, for 
Mechanical Division; 120 cases bolts, 15 cases copper 
tubes, 10 cases electrical material. 20 rolls wire cloth, 9 
cases filter plant material, for Atlantic Division; 88 
cases bolts. 18 bales foghorns, 8 cases pumping ma- 
chinery, for Pacific Division; 110 packages drugs and 
sundries, for Sanitary Department; and a miscel- 
laneous cargo, the whole consisting of 2,871 packages, 
weighing 300 tons. 



Lost — Between pier 11, Cristobal, and house 4, 
Colon Beach, a string of gold beads. Reward if re- 
turned to Mrs. J. P. Mead, Colon. 



Sale of Horizontal Stationary Gasoline Engine. 

Sealed bids will be received at the office of the Depot 
Quartermaster. Mount Hope, until two o'clock P. M., 
October 16, 1911. when they will be opened in the pres- 
ence of attending bidders, for one 2* horse power 
"Williamsport Special" horizontal stationary gasoline 
engine, complete with battery box, cooling tank and 
driving belt. Engine can be seen and examined on any 
working day between the hours of seven to eleven A. M., 
and one to five P. M., upon application to this office. 
The right is reserved to reject any or all bids. Bids 
must be plainly marked "Proposal to purchase one 
stationary gasoline engine, to be opened October 16, 
1911," andioddressed to the Acting Depot Quarter- 
Mount Hope, C. Z. 

Charles L. Parker, 
Acting Depot Quartermaster. 



MOVEMENT OF OCEAN VESSELS. 

The following is a list of the sailings of the Panama 
Railroad Steamship Company; of the Royal Mail 
Steam Packet Company; of the Hamburg-American 
Line, and of the United Fruit Company's Line; the 
Panama Railroad Company's dates being subject to 
change. 

NEW YORK TO CRISTOBAL. 

Colon p. R. R.Thursday.. Oct. 12 

Allianca P. R. R .WednesdayOct. 18 

Panama P. R. R .Tuesday. . . Oct. 24 

Advance p. R. R.Monday... Oct. 30 

CRISTOBAL TO NEW YORK. 

Advance P. R. R..Tuesday.. .Oct. 17 

Colon p. R. R.Tuesday.. .Oct. 24 

Allianca P. R. R.Monday. . .Oct. 30 

Panama P. R. R.Sunday Nov. 5 

Advance p. R. R.Saturday. .Nov. 11 

NEW YORK TO COLON. 

Prinz Joachim H.-A Saturday. .Oct. 7 

Zacapa U. F. C. Thursday.. Oct. 12 

Prinz Eitel Friedrich H.-A Friday Oct. 13 

Atrato R. M... .Saturday. .Oct. 14 

Almirante U. F. C. Thursday.. Oct. 19 

Prinz August Wilhelm H.-A Saturday. .Oct. 21 

Santa Marta IJ. F. C. Thursday.. Oct. 26 

Prinz Sigismund H.-A... .Friday Oct. 27 

Thames R. M.. ..Saturday. .Oct. 28 

Metapan U. F. C..Thursday...Nov. 2 

Prinz Joachim H.-A . .Saturday. . .Nov. 4 

Zacapa Tj. F. C.Thursday.. .Nov. 9 

Prinz Eitel Friedrich H.-A . . Friday Nov. 10 

Trent R. M. . . Saturday . . . Nov. 1 1 

Almirante U. F. C.Thursday. . . Nov. 16 

Prinz August Wilhelm H.-A.. .Saturday .. .Nov. 18 

Santa Marta U. F. C.Thursday.. .Nov. 23 

Prinz Sigismund H.-A Friday Nov. 24 

Oruba R. M . .Saturday.. .Nov. 25 

Metapan U. F. C.Thursday.. .Nov. 30 

Prinz Joachim H.-A . .Saturday. . .Dec. 2 

Zacapa U. F. C.Thursday. ..Dec. 7 

Prinz Eitel Friedrich H.-A . . Friday Dec 8 

Magdalena R. M . . Saturday . . . Dec. 9 

Almirante U. F. C.Thursday Dec. 14 

Prinz August Wilhelm. . . .H.-A. . .Saturday.. .Dec. 16 

Santa Marta U. F. C-.Thursday. . .Dec. 21 

Prinz Sigismund H.-A. . .Friday Dec. 2 

COLON TO NEW YORK. 

Santa Marta U. F. C. Thursday.. Oct. 12 

Prinz Sigismund H.-A Saturday . . Oct. 14 

Thames R. M... .Tuesday.. .Oct. 17 

Metapan U. F. C. . Thursday. . Oct. 19 

Prinz Joachim H.-A Tuesday. . . Oct. 24 

Zacapa U. F. C. . Thursday. . Oct. 26 

Prinz Eitel Friedrich H.-A Saturday . .Oct. 28 

Trent R. M . .. Tuesday.. .Oct. 31 

Almirante U. F. C . Thursday. . Nov. 2 

Prinz August Wilhelm H.-A Tuesday. . . Nov. 7 

Prinz Sigismund H.-A Saturday. .Nov. 11 

Oruba R. M . . .Tuesday. . .Nov. 14 

Metapan U. F. C.Thursday.. .Nov. 16 

Prinz Joachim H.-A . . Tuesday Nov. 21 

Zacapa U. F. C.Thursday . . . Nov. 23 

Prinz Eitel Friedrich H.-A . .Saturday. . .Nov. 25 

Magdalena R. M . . Tuesday. . . . Nov. 28 

Almirante U. F. C.Thursday. . . Nov. 30 

Prinz August Wilhelm. .. .H.-A ..Tuesday Dec. 5 

Santa Marta U. F. C.Thursday.. .Dec. 7 

Prinz Sigismund H.-A. . . Saturday . . . Dec. 9 

Clyde R. M. .Tuesday.. ..Dec. 12 

Metapan U. F. C.Thursday.. .Dec. 14 

Prinz Joachim H.-A . . Tuesday Dec. 19 

Zacapa U. F. C.Thursday.. .Dec. 21 

NEW ORLEANS TO COLON. 

Atenas U. F. CSaturday. .Oct. 7 

Parismina U. F. C. Wednesday.Oct. 11 

Turrialba U. F. CSaturday. .Oct. 14 

Heredia TJ. F. C. Wednesday.Oct. 18 

Abangarez U. F. CSaturday ...Oct. 21 

Cartago U. F. C Wednesday.Oct. 25 

Atenas U. F. CSaturday. ..Oct. 28 

Parismina U. F. CWednesday.Nov. 1 

Turrialba U. F. C. .Saturday. .Nov. 4 

Heredia U. F. CWednesday.Nov. 4 

Abangarez U. F. C . .Saturday . . Nov. 1 1 

Cartago IJ. F. CWednesday.Nov. 15 

COLON TO NEW ORLEANS. 

Cartago IJ. F. C Thursday.. Oct. 12 

Abangarez U. F. C Thursday.. Oct. 12 

Parismina TJ. F. C Thursday.. Oct. 19 

Atenas TJ. F. C Thursday.. Oct. 19 

Heredia IJ. F. C Thursday.. Oct. 26 

Turrialba TJ. F. C. .Thursday. . Oct. 26 

Cartago TJ. F. C Thursday. . Nov. 2 

Abangarez TJ. F. C Thursday. .Nov. 2 

Parismina TJ. F. C Thursday.. Nov. 9 

Atenas U. F. C . .Thursday. . NoV. 9 



CANAL 




RECORD 



Volume V. 



ANCON, CANAL ZONE, WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 18, 1911. 



No. 8. 



The Canal Record 

Published weekly under the authority and supervision of 
the Isthmian Canal Commission. 



The Canal Record is issued free of charge, one copy 
each, to all employes of the Commission and Panama 
Railroad Company whose names are on the gold roll. 
Extra copies and back numbers can be obtained from the 
news stands of the Panama Railroad Company for five 
cents each. 

Address all Communications 

THE CANAL RECORD, 

Ancon, Canal Zone, 

Isthmus of Panama. 

No communication, either for publication or requesting 
information, will receive attention unless signed with the 
full name and address of the writer, 

NOTES OF PROGRESS. 



Chairman's Report. 

The report of the Chairman of the Isthmian 
Canal Commission for the month of Septem- 
ber is published in full in other columns of this 
issue of The Canal Record. It gives a 
detailed account of the progress of the Canal 
work in all departments and divisions. 



Pedro Miguel Locks. 

An effort is being made to complete the 
back fill on the west side of Pedro Miguel 
Locks by November 1, in order that it may be 
used by the lock gate contractor as a storage 
yard for materials for the lower guard and 
operating gates. On October 16 there re- 
mained to be filled an area that will require 
about 30,000 cubic yards of material. Spoil 
from the lock site at Miraflores has been used 
up to the present time, but this week there 
will be added to this, seven or eight trains 
daily of excavation from Culebra Cut, averag- 
ing about 3S0 yards to a train. In all it is ex- 
pected that about 3.500 cubic yards a day will 
be durnped between now and the end of the 
month. In making the climb from the south 
end of the locks to the level of the top of the 
walls the trains go up 60 feet in about a quar- 
ter of a mile. 

The placing of material for the north guard 
gates is about half completed, this work having 
been delayed by non-delivery of material 
from the States. In order to expedite the 
gate erection, the contractor will build a sec- 
ond construction bridge over the lock cham- 
bers, from which materials for the lower guard 
and operating gates will be lowered into place. 
Thus, work on all four gates at Pedro Miguel 
will be in progress at one time. 

Concrete laying is so nearly completed that 
only isolated portions remain to be done. At 
the north end, the slow and intricate work of 
placing the three gate valves in each of the side 
wall intakes and the sluice gate of the center 
wall intake, is in progress. At the south end, 
excavation for the outlet on the east side has 
been completed and concrete laying is in pro- 
gress. A 70-ton shovel is completing the exca- 



vation for the southeast wing wall, and con- 
crete work will be begun in a few days. As 
soon as it has finished digging at this point, the 
shovel will be taken to the hill that rises above 
the lock walls on the east side, and there will 
excavate for the back fill of the east wall 

In the west chamber at the south end, the 
laying of the floor south of the caisson sill is 
being expedited. When this is in place the 
drainage water from Culebra Cut, which flows 
through the center culvert of Pedro Miguel 
locks and from the outlet through the ap- 
proach to the east lock, will be diverted to the 
west approach, in order that the floor in the 
east approach may be finished. 

Surplus of Common Labor. 

The Isthmian Canal Commission wishes to 
announce that there is on the Isthmus at 
present a surplus of unemployed labor both 
European and West Indian. If laborers are 
desired by any recruiting agents, the agents 
should notify the Chief Quartermaster, Cule- 
bra how man>- men they can give employ- 
ment, where they are to go, and what wages 
will be paid them. The Chief Quartermaster 
will then send the agent such men as desire to 
accept the terms offered This will continue 
in force so long as surplus labor is available. 



North Guide Wall at Miraflores Locks. 

Work on the north guide wall at Miraflores 
Locks was begun on September 30, when an 
experimental caisson was sunk for one of the 
foundation piers. The plant for sinking the 
remainder of the 250 caissons is nearing com- 
pletion, and will be in operation this week. 

This wall will be a cellular, reinforced con- 
crete structure extending into Miraflores Lake 
from the north end of the center wall of the 
locks, and will serve the double purpose of 
guiding ships into the locks and of carrying 
the towing locomotives that will take hold of 
vessels in the approach. It will be 1,185 feet 
long, 58 feet wide, and will be composed of 
two face walls of reinforced concrete from 14 
to 23 inches thick, depending on the depth be- 
low the top of the wall, with cross walls 18 
inches thick on centers of 15 feet. Thus it will 
be a series of cells about 54 feet across and 1 8 ' 
feet longitudinally. At the north end the wall 
will be solid for 31 feet 6 inches. 

The rock upon which Miraflores locks are 
founded dips at the north end of the lock site 
and at the beginning of the guide wall is about 
10 feet below sea level while at the end it is 
48 feet below. In order to avoid excavation 
and to economize on concrete, the wall will be 
founded upon concrete piers >unk to rock. 
The work now in progress is the sinking of 
of caissons for these piers. The caissons are 
made of reinforced concrete in steel forms, in 
six foot sections, and are 5 feet 6 inches at in- 
side diameter and 7 feet 6 inches at outside, 
the shell being thus one foot thick. They will 
be sunk in three rows, longitudinally at 15 
foot intervals, and laterally on 27 foot centers 
except under the solid portion where there will 



be four rows. It is proposed to work on eight 
at one time, and to this end eight working 
platforms have been erected on skids, so that 
they can be moved from one series of caissons 
to another as the work is completed. 

By means of a rope drive a series of eight 
pulleys, one to each platform, is kept moving 
constantly. Each pulley is direct connected to 
a "nigger head," and the operation of lifting 
a bucket of spoil from the caisson pit is ac- 
complished by a double turn, on the "nigger 
head," of a rope that passes through a block 
immediately over the caisson. The spoil will 
be hauled to the dumps nearby in Decauville 
cars. When the caissons are down to rock they 
will be filled with concrete. 



Gatun Spillway Program. 

During the period from the present to Jan- 
uary 1, 1912, work on the spillway of Gatun 
Dam will be confined to the construction of 
the machinery tunnel to 69 feet above sea 
level, the lower portion of the crest piers out- 
side the channel of flow, the lower portion of 
abutments, flare walls, and approach walls. 
Work is now in progress on the forming for the 
machinery tunnel, 8 by 10 feet, which will 
extend the entire length of the concrete dam. 
A program for the construction of the spillway 
dam and works has been prepared as follows: 

PERIOD JANUARY 1, 1912 TO APRIL 30, 1912. 

Closure of channel of flow to elevation plus SO; and 
installation of sluice gates with operating machinery on 
piers at elevation plus 70. Estimated concrete. 25,710 
cubic yards, an average of 257 cubic yards per working 
day. 

Every' possible perparation will be made before Jan- 
uary* first for doing this work at the maximum practic- 
able rate. Equipment for placing concrete, handling 
forms, etc.. will consist of three derricks with 70-foot 
boom so placed as to cover the full channel width; and 
movable chutes for depositing concrete at any point 
directly from dump cars. These facilities provide for 
placing concrete at over four times the required average 
rate. 

During January and part of February, when the 
river flow is considerable, it is proposed to coffer off not 
more than two-thirds of the channel, completing the 
closure and opening the sluiceways not later than Feb- 
ruary 28, when the discharge has dropped to about the 
minimum. Arc lights will be installed so that any night 
work necessary to advance the work may be advan- 
tageously prosecuted. 

PERIOD APRIL 30, 1912 TO AUGUST 1. 1912. 

Sluice gates are to be closed at the beginning of this 
period and with normal flow, the lake will reach plus 50 
at the end thereof. All concrete and bulkhead closures 
needed to force flood flow over central portion of dam 
at plus 50. as well as trash racks, pipes, control gates, 
etc., in hydro-electric plant forebay, will be placed dur- 
ing May. Thereafter, abutments and adjacent walls 
and crest piers will be carried toward final levels, work- 
ing from a trestle at elevation plus 93. Estimated con- 
crete. 8,800 cubic yards, an average of 117 cubic yards 
per working day. 

PERIOD AUGUST 1. 1912 TO JANUARY 1. 1913. 

Concrete force will be employed principally in the 
construction of the hydro-electric plant. On the Spill- 
way dam about 2.500 cubic yards will be placed, carry- 
ing crest piers outside channel of flow to final heights. 
This work to be done from trestle at plus 93 on top of 
ogee. I? crest gates and foot bridges are ready, they will 
be placed during this period on the practically com- 
pleted flanks of the dam. A study of maximum dis- 
charge for various periods indicates that the lake level 



58 



THE CANAL RECORD 



Vol. V., No. 8. 



NOTES OF PROGRESS. 



(Continued.) 



will probably not exceed plus 59 under the conditions 
obtaining. 

PERIOD SUBSEQUENT TO JANUARY 1, 1913. 

By manipulating the sluiceway gates, the lake will be 
held at about plus 50, and the machinery tunnel, ogee 
to plus 69, and lower portion of crest piers will be com- 
pleted across the channel of flow. Estimated concrete, 
10,375 cubic yards to be placed by April 1, average per 
day 138 cubic yards. 

After April 1, the trestle at plus 93, already built 
along the top of the flanks of the dam, will be joined 
across the central portion ; the remaining crest piers car- 
ried to final elevation (5,960 cubic yards), the sluice- 
ways fulled (1.231 cubic yards), and gates and machin- 
ery of same removed, about April 30; the crest gates 
and foot bridge placed by wrecking cranes working 
from the plus 93 trestle; machinery installed in tunnel; 
and the dam completed. With normal flow, the lake 
will gradually rise from plus 50 on April 30, to plus 69 
on August 1. 

Gatun Dam Spillway. 

The concrete work in the Spillway of Gatun 
Dam is about 70.5 percent completed, 158,642 
cubic yards, out of a total of 225,000, having 
been placed at the close of work an Octo- 
ber 14. A statement of the amount laid each 
working day last week, and of the total in 
place, follows: 



Date. 


Concrete 
Laid. 


Hours 
worked. 


No. 

Mixers. 




156 
126 
88 
152 
168 
100 


7.30 
7.00 
4.30 
7.30 
8.00 
5.30 


j 




1 




1 




1 




1 






Total 


800 
157,842 


40.00 


1 


Previously reported .... 




Grand total 


158.642 







Porto Bello Crusher. 




Date. 


Hours 
worked. 


Cubic 
Yards. 




4. 13 
4.06 
4.01 
3.49 
3.13 
2.58 


1,351 




1,649 




1,333 




1,607 




1.677 




1,437 









Total 22.20 



Ancon Crusher. 



Date. 


Hours 
worked. 


Cubic 
Yards. 




5.35 
6.50 
8.20 
8.00 
8.05 
7.50 


2,162 




2,376 




2,897 




2,613 




2,969 




2,614 






Total 


44.40 


15,631 







Municipal Improvements in Panama. 

Work has been begun on'the improvements 
in the streets of the city of Panama which 
were requested by the Secretary of Foreign 
Affairs of the Republic in a letter to the Head 
of the Department of Civil Administration of 
the Canal Zone, March 28, 1911. Under the 
contract of July 1, 1910, such improvements 
are to be made by the Commission, and when 
paid for by the Republic of Panama they be- 
come the property of Panama. 

The streets to be improved at this time are 
Ancon Boulevard, 1,700 feet long, which runs 
south from Fourth of July Street, in a direct- 
ion generally parallel to the Zone Line Road, 
and intersects the Balboa Road two blocks 
east of the Protestant cemetery; what is un- 
officially known as Magoon Street, running 



from the Zone Line Road at a point just north 
of the National Institute, to Central Avenue 
at its intersection with Lyons Street, 1,050 
feet; two blocks of West Seventeenth Street, 
north from the Balboa Road and east of Ancon 
Boulevard, 690 feet; and an extension of C 
Street west from Sixteenth Street to Ancon 
Boulevard, two blocks, 600 feet. In all, 4,040 



feet of street along which 8-inch sewer and 6- 
inch water mains are to be laid, the surface 
graded and macadamized, and gutters and 
curbing set. The water main is to connect 
with the main on Fourth of July Street, while 
the sewer system will drain to the west, 
through the Cocoa Grove section, to the Bay 
of Panama. The cost is estimated at $27,500. 



CONCRETE WORK IN THE LOCKS. 



Over 68 per cent of the concrete for the locks is in place, the amount at the close of 
work on October 14, being 2,860.117 cubic yards, out of a total of approximately 4,199,400. 
A total of 32,882 cubic yards of concrete was laid in the locks during the week ending 
October 14. 

GATUN LOCKS. 

Over 82 per cent of the concrete for the system of three twin locks at Gatun has been 
laid, the amount in place at the close of work on October 14 being 1,647,693 cubic yards, 
out of a total of 2,000,000. A statement of the amount of concrete placed in the locks each 
working day for the week ending October 14, and of the total, follows; and a similar state- 
ment for the work in the spillway of Gatun Dam is published elsewhere in this issue. The 
construction plant works 12 hours daily, and the auxiliary plant 9 hours. 



Date. 


Construction Plant. 
2-cubic yferd mixers. 


Auxiliary Plant. 
2-cubic yard mixers. 


Large 
stone. 






Concrete 
placed . 


Hours 
worked . 


No. of 
mixers 


Concrete 
olaced. 


Hours t No. of 
worked, mixers 




October 9 


Cu. Yds. 
1.708 
1,950 
1,504 
1,494 
1,542 
1,750 


27.54 
33.34 
25.24 
28.24 
24.56 
26.58 


6 
6 
6 
6 
6 
6 


Cu. Yds. 
472 
240 
138 
144 
276 
316 
389 


6.50 
4.40 
3.40 
3 03 
4.40 
6.40 


2 
2 
2 
2 
2 
2 


Cu. Yds. 

70 
140 
100 
106 

68 

92 


Cu. Yds. 
2.250 
2,360 
1,742 
1,744 




October 12 

October 13 




2,158 


















Total 


9,978 


167.10 


6 


1,978 


29.33 


2 


576 


12.529 






















1.647,693 



*The 389 yards shown for the portable mixers are reinforced concrete, and were placed on the following days: 
October 9th, 72; October 10th. 57i; October 1 lth, 60 J; October 12th, 60}; October 13th, 60; October 14th, 57}. 

PEDRO MIGUEL LOCKS. 

Concrete work in the locks at Pedro Miguel is over 88 per cent completed, 741,028 cubic 
yards, out of a total of 837,400, bucket measurement, having been placed at the close of work 
on October 14. The record for each of the six 8-hour working days of last week, follows: 





Auxiliary Plant. 


Large 
stone. 






Date. 


2-cubic yard mixers. 


}-cubic yard mixers. 


Total. 




Concrete 
placed. 


Hours 
worked. 


No. of 
mixers 


Concrete 
placed. 


Hours 
worked. 


No. of 
mixers 






Cu. Yds. 
530 
738 
646 
400 
672 
714 


16.50 
18.00 
19.00 
10.50 
18.00 
18.00 


3 


Cu. Yds. 
426 


22.00 
11.00 
12.00 
17.00 
20.50 
22.50 


3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 


Cu. Yds. 


Cu. Yds. 




3 
3 
3 
3 
3 


166 
207 
299 
381 
409 








October 12 






1.053 
1 123 










3,700 


111 I 


3 


1,888 


105.00 


3 


4,411 


5.588 
735,440 






























4,411 


741,028 








1 









MIRAFLORES LOCKS. 

Over 34.6 per cent of the concrete for the system of two twin locks at Miraflores was 
in place on October 14. the total amount on that date being 471,396 cubic yards, bucket 
measurement, out of a total of approximately 1,362.000. The record for each of the six 8-hour 
working days of last week, follows: 







lant. 
xers. 


Auxiliary Plant. 




Date. 


2-cubic yard mi 


2-cubic yard mixers. 


}-cubic yard mixer. 


Total. 




Concrete 
placed. 


Hours 
worked. 


No. of 

mixers 


Concrete 
placed. 


Hours 
worked. 


No. of 
mixers 


Concrete 
placed. 


Hours 
worked. 


No. of 
mixers 


Large 

stone. 




Oct. 8... 


Cu. Yds. 






Cu. Yds. 
282 
1,038 
1,122 
10.22 
1,130 
1,172 
1,022 


3.50 
18.00 
15.30 
13.67 
15.30 
16.90 
14.40 


1 

2 
2 
2 
2 
2 
2 


Cu. Yds. 






Cu. Yds. 


Cu. Yds. 


Oct. 9... 
Oct. 10. . . 
Oct. 11... 
Oct. 12 . . . 
Oct. 13. .. 
Oct. 14... 


1.502 

1,320 

668 

496 

1,242 

900 


35.33 
27.17 
18.50 
25.17 
35.00 
25.33 


6 
6 
5 
6 
6 
6 


303 
345 
318 
262 
267 
354 


24.75 
26.75 
23.00 
19.00 
20.00 
24.50 


4 
4 
3 
3 
3 
3 




2,843 
2,787 
2,008 
1,888 
2,681 
2,276 


Total... 
Previously 


6,128 


166.50 


5.83 


6,788 


97.07 


1.86 


1.849 


138.00 


3.33 


3,693 


14,765 
456,631 
























Grand 


3,693 


471,396 



October IS, 1911. 



THE CANAL RECORD 



59 



EXECUTIVE ORDER. demonstrate their capacity properly to oper- 

ate an automobile, and must have the auto- 

To Amend Sections 51, (>2, ;ind 526, ami to Repeal i.:i ...jfL t| u . m 

Sections 63 and 529 of the Code of Civil _! 

Procedure of the Canal Zone. Rodmen and Levelmen. 

By virtue of the authorit] vested in me, 1 An examination to test the fitness of rod- 

hereby establish the following Order for the men and levelmen for promotion will be held 

Canal Zone: at Culebra on Sunday, October 29. Era- 

Article I: Section 51 of the Code of Civil ployes wishing to enter this examination 

Procedure of the Canal Zone is hereby should forward their applications through 

amended to read as follows: the head of the department or division in 

Section 51: Pleadings in the District which they are serving to Mr. A. B. Nichols, 

Courts shall be oral, except when they chairman of the examining board, Culebra. 

arc required by law to be verified by the 

oath of either of the parties to the suit, in PE RSONA L. 

which case the pleadings shall be in writing. Among the passengers on the Colon, which 

Article II: Section 62 of the above men- will arrive on October 18, are Mr. H. H. Rous- 

tioned Code is hereby amended so as to read seau, with Mrs. Rousseau and child, and Mr. 

as follows: Henry Goldmark and family. 

Section 62: Every District Judge shall A party of Senators and Representatives, 

keep a well bound book styled "Docket," in» including Senators Brandegee, of Connecticut, 

which he shall enter the name and style of Cummingsof Iowa, Wetmoreof Rhode Island, 

every civil suit brought before him; the Overman of North Carolina, Brown of Ne- 

dates of issuing process therein and of the braska, Bristow of Kansas, Thornton of 

return thereof; a brief statement of the Louisiana, and Jones of Washington, are 

nature of the suit and of any plea made among the passengers on the A neon, due to 

thereto by the defendant, and if no appear- arrive at Cristobal on October 22. 

ance is made, the defendant's default shall 

be noted; the names of the witnesses sworn; Obituary, 
the date and the amount of the j udgment ; C. B. West, an employe of the Central Divi- 
the date of issuing execution or other pro- sion at Empire, died at Colon Hospital on Oc- 
cess upon the judgment, and a copy of the tober 11, 1911. He was 44 years of age, mar- 
returns theron; the appeal, when and by ried, and had been on the Isthmus for six 
whom demanded; and briefly all the pro- years, having come here from New York. He 
ceedings before him touching the suit. is survived by his wife. 

Each District Judge, at the beginning of John P. Thayer, whose last residence in the 

his docket and before any entries are made States was at Ardmore, Okla., died in Santo 

therein shall make and subscribe the follow- Tomas Hospital, Panama, on October 11, of 

ing certificate, substantially, to-wit: — Bright's disease. He entered the employ of 

"A docket of proceedings in civil matters the Commission on December 15, 1905, re- 

before , signing on January 30, 1911 to become Assist- 

District Judge of the Administrative Dis- ant Chief Engineer of the Republic of Panama. 

trict of , Canal Zone. He was 50 years of age. and is survived by his 

Witness my signature wife and two children. 

Article III Section ?26 oftliTabove men- _ United Fr L uit Co »»P an /' s N <; w s "" s - 

tioned Code is herebv amended so as to read ™ ree new shl P s ' the Candlo, Ttrnves and 

as follows - Sixola, are neanng completion at Bellast for 

Section 526: Costs shall ordinarily be the United Fruit Company. The Carnllo is 

allowed to the prevailing party as a matter scheduled to arrive at Colon on Thursday, 

of course, but the court shall have power for October 25, after making a stop at Kingston. 

special reasons to adjudge that either parts' 1 he Tlvlve > 1S scheduled to arrive at Colon on 

shall pay the costs of an action or that the either Wednesday, November 8, or Thursday, 

' same be divided as may be equitable; and November 9, after making a stop at Kingston. 

the court mav, for sufficient cause, order The Slxola ls scheduled to arrive at Kingston 

that no costs be taxed against either party ? n Saturday, November 11, from where it will 

to any suit or special proceedings. be dispatched to New Orleans direct at the 

Article IV: Sections 63 and 529 of the ea jl iest possible date. 

Code of Civil Procedure are hereby repealed. The saihn ^ from New Orleans of the Pans- 

Article Y: This Order shall take effect 90 mnm on October IS, and that of the Heredia 

days from and alter this date. on November 1, will be cancelled and their 

Wm H T*ft places taken by the Carrillo and Ttvtves re- 

The White House, spectively. 

Sept. 26, 1911. United Spanish War Veterans. 

At a meeting of Chagres Camp No. 2, U. S. 

PilotB. Mates, Masters, Engineers, Chauffeurs. \\. \'., M Culebra (in October 8, a resolution of 

Examinations for pilots, mates, masters and sympathy addressed t<> Mrs. Winfield Scotl 

engineers, and for chauffeurs, will be held by Schley was adopted on accounl of the death 

the Board of Local Inspectors at the Admin- of Rear Admiral Schley, who was a comrade 

istration Building, Ancon, on October 25. of Harden Camp of Washington. 
All applicants for licenses as chauffeur must 

secure from the Department of Civil Adminis- The dedication and blessing of the Catholic 

tration, Executive Office. Ancon, forms of chapel .n Gatun took place on Sunday, Oc- 

application, and information n the tober 2, by the pastor, the Rev. M. A. Jiamona. 

filling out of the same, not later than the day Mass was sung by the Misses Butler of Cris- 

previous to the examination. All applicants tobal. The chapel was decorated by the !. 

for examination must be present at the of t he Altar Society. The Rev. Jiamona leaves 

Administration Building at 8.00 a. m. on Oc- for a five months visit to Rome on October 17, 

tober 25, with papers in properform. In ackli- and during his absence mass will be celebrated 

tion, applicants for chauffeurs' licenses must by the Rev. Jos^de Ruggero of Panama. 



COMMISSION CLUBHOUSES. 

Activities of the Young Men's Christian Associa- 
tion. 

The schedule of moving picture entertainments for the 
. ( >ctober 23 to 28, follows: Monday, Gatun; Tues- 
Cristobal; Wednesday, Gorgona; Thursday, 
Corozal; Friday, Empire; Saturday, Culebra. 

The standing of the fathmian Basket Hall League on 
October 14, follows: 

Team, Won. Lost. P. C. 

Cristobal 2 1.000 

Culebra 1 1.000 

Gatun 2 2 .500 

Gorgona 2 2 .500 

Empire 2 .000 

Corozal 1 .000 

The standing of the teams in the Isthmian Bowling 
League on October 14, follows: 

Team. Played. Won. Lost. P. C. 

Empire 42 32 10 .761 

Cristobal 42 24 IK .571 

Gatun. ...... 42 24 is .571 

Gorgona 42 22 20 .523 

Marines 36 13 17 .433 

Culebra 36 9 27 .250 

CULEBRA. 

The bowling game between the Marines and Culebra, 
which was to have been rolled Saturday night, has been 
postponed unl'l Thursday night. October 19. 

The high scores rolled during the week are as follows: 
Ten Pins— Dougherty 220; Case 200; Mitchell 200; 
Mengel 207, 211. Duckpins — Hobart 107, 102. 

COROZAL. 

On Saturday night October 21, the basket ball team 
w'll play the Gatun team at Gatun 

A general course in "Studies in Social Reform and 
What to Do" will bestarted at the Clubhouse on Wed- 
nesday night, October 25. At the rir^t meeting the sub- 
ject of accidents will be taken up for discussion. All 
men are invited to attend the class and take part in the 
discussions. 

EMPIRE. 

In the league games bowled on Saturday October 14, 
on the Empire alleys. Empire took two out of three 
games. The scores were as follows.: 

Empire: 790. 802. 957. Cristobal: 746, 872. 930. 

On Saturday, October 21, Camp Elliott will bowl on 
Empire alleys in the league series. 

The basket ball game between Empire and Cristobal 
played on Empire court October 14, resulted in Cris- 
tobal winning by a score of 20 to 14. On Saturday, Oc- 
tober 21, the Gorgona team will play at Empire. 

GORGONA. 

On Saturday night the Gorgona bowling team took 
two out of three games from Gatun on the local floor. 
In the last frame of the last game Gatun was ahead, 
each team having taken one of the preceding games, 
when Haggerty made a strike out, putting Gorgona 
ahead by two points. The scores were as follows: 

Gorgona: 773, 781. 786. Gatun: 662. 799. 784. 

In basket ball, Gatun defeated Gorgona on the local 
floor last Saturday night, by a score of 22 to 1 1 

Next Saturday evening the local team will play at 
Empire. 

John C. Kendall has presented the clubhouse with 
three hand-made orchid baskets, filled with many vari- 
eties of orchids gathered from the jungle. 

GATUN. 

Gatun took al! three games of bowling with Gorgona 
at Gatun on Saturday, October 14. 

Mr. R. L. Dwe'.le, formerly of the Greenpoint Branch 
V. M. C. A.. Brooklyn, has arrived on the Isthmusand 
taken up his duties as Physical Director of the Gatun 
V. M. C. A. The gymnasium classes will continue to 
meet Tuesdays and Fridays with basketball practice on 
Monday and Thursday evenings. 

On Monday afternoon the Boy's Department will be 
reorganized and placed under the direction of Mr. 
Dwelle. The boys will have regular gymnasium classes 
various teams well be formed, hikes and trips taken and 
an atheletic meet will be held. There are twenty one 
boys in the junior Department. 

CRISTOBAL. 

The address by I.. A. Mason, of Culebra, on the 
Installation and Operation of Lock Machinery, sched- 
ule! for October 18, has been postpoo nesday, 
October 25. 

A Bible study club has been organized and will bold 
its first session on Monday. October 22, and there will be 
meetings for twelve consecutive weeks, 

The Culebra basket balLteam will play the Cristobal 
team on the local floor on Saturday. October 21. 

The Gatun bowling team will bowl the local team at 
Cristobal on Saturday, October 21. 

The Empire bowling team took three games from 
Cristobal on Saturday evening, October 14, by the fol- 
lowing scores: 

Empire: 875. 843. 819. Cristobal: 863. 814. 784. 



60 



THE CANAL RECORD 



Vol. V., No. 8. 



CANAL WORK IN SEPTEMBER. 



Monthly Report of the Chairman and Chief 
Engineer to the Secretary of War. 

Culebra, C. Z., October 12, 1911. 
The Honorable the Secretary of War, 
Washington, D. C. 

Sir: I have the honor to submit the fol- 
lowing report of operations on the Isthmus 
for the month of September. 1911. 
Department of Construction and Engineering. 

The following table summarizes the prin- 
cipal items of construction work accomplished 
by the Atlantic, Central and Pacific Divisions 
during the month: 



upper guard gates, west lock, with the except- 
ion of the sheathing plates, footwalks, fender 
angles, manhole covers, etc., has been erected 
in place. Practically all interior riveting, but 
only about 5 percent of the exterior riveting, 
has been done. 

At Pedro Miguel, about 41 per cent of the 
structural material for leaves 50, 51, 52, and 
53, upper guard gates, east and west lock, has 
been erected, of which 20 per cent has been 
riveted in place. 

Satisfactory progress has been made on the 
erection and adjustment, as well as in the bab- 
bitting, of the nickel steel bearing plates in the 



Item. 


Unit. 


Atlantic. 


Central. 


Pacific. 


Total. 




Cubic yards 


77,976 
420.434 


1.351,445 
10,000 


136.681 
534,667 


1.566.102 
965,101 








498,410 


1.361,445 


678,909 


2.538.764 






















7,561 


7,561 
















Cubic yards 

Cubic yards 

Cubic yards 

Tons (Gross)... 


498,410 


1,361,445 


678,<J09 


2.538.764 






456,335 

60.948 

53.93 

38,860 




44,941 

71,462 

39.51 

101.666 


501.276 
132,410 

313.48 

528,498 
11.82 
27.48 

102,642 








220.04 

3S7.972 
11.80 
20.91 


Rock drilled 










1.91 

44.352 
64,825 
0.35 

1,078 
1.079 

l'.I.CUfl 

7.257 
7.97 


4.66 

58.290 
74,219 




Cubic yards 




190 






0.35 

3.190 

1,079 

30.655 

21.193 

6.35 




Feet 


350 


1.762 










275 
S.609 

5.41 


10,695 
5.327 
8.48 















First Division, Office of the Chief Engineer. 

MASONRY AND LOCK STRUCTURES. 

The material under contract for work de- 
signed in this subdivision, as stated in reports 
for previous months, is being inspected by the 
force of the General Purchasing Officer in the 
United States, and the erection work on the 
Isthmus is being conducted by the Division 
Engineers, under supervision of this office. 
The field work consisted of setting of Stoney 
valve fixed irons in the masonry; measure- 
ments of emergency dam sills at Gatun; 
experiments of flow of water through orifices, 
and final hydraulic test of Stoney valves at 
Gatun. 

LOCK GATES AND PROTECTIVE DEVICES. 

Up to September 20, a total of 33,330 tons 
of material had been accepted at the mills, 
about 1,600 tons having been accepted at the 
mills during the month; and a total of 20,765 
tons, or about 40 per cent of the total 
contract, had been shipped to the Isthmus. 

All of the material required for the 54' 8" 
upper guard gates, for the 77' upper and mid- 
dle gates, and 97 per cent of the material re- 
quired for the 77' safety and lower gates at 
Gatun; and all of the material required for 
the 54' 8" upper gates, 92 per cent of the ma- 
terial for the 79' upper and middle gates, and 
22 per cent of the material required for the 79' 
safety and lower gates at Pedro Miguel, has 
been accepted and shipped. 

At Gatun, all structural material required 
in the construction of leaves 37 and 38, upper 
guard gates, east lock, with the exception of 
the footwalks, fender angles, manhole covers, 
etc., has been erected in place. The interior 
riveting of these leaves is practically complet- 
ed, and of the exterior riveting, about 40 per 
cent has been done. All structural material re- 
quired in the construction of leaves 39 and 40, 



hollow quoins at both Gatun and Pedro Mi- 
guel. Owing to discrepancies in alignment of 
bearing plates in quoin for leaf No. 36. Gatun, 
the acceptance of this quoin has been with- 
held since June, pending satisfactory disposit- 
ion of same by the contractor. 

INSPECTION OF OPERATING MACHINERY AND 
ELECTRICAL EQUIPMENT. 

The force of this subdivision, reporting 
directly to this office, has cared for the techni- 
cal matters relating to inspection as follows: 

(1) For the Stoney and cylindrical valve 
machines, purchased under Circular 614: 
Preparations have been made for test of the 
first Stoney gate valve machine which has been 
erected in the shops of the contractor, and 
tests were to have been started about the mid- 
dle of the month. Complete tests have been 
made on one cylindrical valve machine. This 
machine was first assembled at the works of 
contractor with driving motors of different 
manufacturers. Later the machine was tested 
under various loads, and, but for a few minor 
details, the tests show the machines to be 
satisfactory. 

(2) For the rack railway and other material 
purchased under Circular 619: A large quan- 
tity of conductor rail material for sections, the 
lower portion of Pedro Miguel approach and 
wing walls, was shipped from the works of the 
contractor. Satisfactory progress is reported 
on the various castings and malleable iron 
cover plates; also on bolts, nuts and small 
parts, and on the bumping posts. The con- 
tractors have been having considerable dif- 
ficulty in producing castings for the rack 
which are free from shrinkage cracks and 
washouts. 

(3) For the gate operating machines, Class 
1, and miter forcing machines, Class 2, pur- 



chased under Circular 627: Satisfactory prog- 
ress is reported upon the sample machines. 

(4 ) For the gate and girder hoisting machi- 
nery for the emergency dams: Testing rig has 
been completed and erected for testing out 
the worm gearing of the hoisting machines 
purchased under Circular 616. 

Considerable material under the above con- 
tracts has been received on the Isthmus and 
inspected and checked upon its arrival. 

A force has been organized for the erection 
of the machinery and the installation of the 
electrical apparatus on the Isthmus, and work 
preliminary to placing the first machines was 
commenced during the month. 

EMERGENCY DAMS. 

The inspection in the United States under 
this subdivision progressed satisfactorily dur- 
ing the month. Up to the 20th of the month, a 
• total of 213 drawings for the turning and wedg- 
ing machinery had been approved. At the 
works of the contractors about 225 tons of 
nickel steel and about 43 tons of carbon steel 
were rolled during the month. Satisfactory 
progress has also been made in the manufac- 
ture of roller bearings for the gates of the 
emergency dams. 

AIDS TO NAVIGATION. 

■ During the month S0h acres of land were 
cleared in the vicinity of Pena Blanca for sites 
for beacons and reference buoys, at an average 
cost of $9.82 per acre; 42.200 lineal feet of 
trochas were cut; and the necessary land for 
making surveys was cleared and profile taken. 
The places for sixteen gas buoys were located 
and referenced at Mamei, Juan Grande and 
Santa Cruz, and between Pena Blanca and 
Trinidad P. I. 

Work on the construction of Range No. 9- 
,11, Pacific Division, was begun on September 
5, and at the close of the month the caisson 
foundation for Light No. 9 was completed to 
a height of 8 ft., and the forms were placed in 
position to pour the concrete for the walls. 
The foundation pier for Light No. 11 was 
completed to its required height, and the erec- 
tion of the steel forms for the tower was under 
way. Preliminary work was undertaken for 
constructing the foundations of the front light 
of Range No. 13-14, Pacific Division. 

CONTRACTS, IN FORCE AND UNDER ADVERTISE- 
MENT. . 

Circular 513 — Anchorages for lock gates; 
United Engineering & Foundry Co., contract- 
ors. All material under this contract has been 
shipped to the Isthmus, but approximately 
$5,000 of final payment is withheld to cover 
defective nickel steel bearing plates and stud 
bolts. 

Circular 576 — Lock gates for all locks; Mc- 
Clintic-Marshall Construction Company, con- 
tractors. Forty per cent of the material has 
been shipped. 

Circular 594 — Class 1. Fixed irons for 
Stoney valves; Wheeling Mold and Foundry 
Company, contractors; contract 90 per cent 
completed. 

Circular 614 — Class 1, Item 1: Two stoney 
gate valve machines, except motors; Wheeling 
Mold and Foundry Company, Contractors. 
Contract practically completed. Item 2 ; 114 
Stoney gate valve machines, except motors; 
contract to be awarded after test of machines 
under Item 1. 

Class 2, Item 1 — Two cylindrical valve ma- 
chines, except motors; Wheeling Mold and 
Foundry Company, contractors. Contract 
practically completed. Item 2. 118 cylindrical 



October 18, 1911. 



THE CANAL RECORD 



61 



valve machines, except motors; contract to be 
awarded after test of machines under Item 1. 

Class 3, Item 1 — 2 motors for Stum 
valve machines; sample motors purchased 
from General Electric Co., Westinghouse Elec- 
tric ec Manufacturing Company, and Allis- 
Chalmers Co. Contract 100 per cent com- 
pleted. Item 2 — 1 14 motors for Stoney gate 
valve machines; to be awarded after test 
under Item 1. 

Class 4, hem 1 — 2 motors for cylindrical 
valve machines; sample motors purchased 
from above three manufacturers; 100 per cent 
completed. Item 2 — 118 motors for cylind- 
rical valve machines; contract to be awarded 
after test of motors under Item 1. 

Class 5, Items 1 and 3 — 2 limit switches pur- 
chased from General Electric Co., Westing- 
house Electric and Manufacturing Co., and 
Cutler-Hammer Mfg. Co.; 100 per cent com- 
pleted. Items 2 and 4 — Limit switches for 
1 14 Stoney gate and 118 cylindrical valve ma- 
chines, respectively, to be awarded after test 
of limit switches under Items 1 and 3. 

Circular 616 — Six emergency dams; con- 
tract awarded to United States Steel Products 
Company; to complete deliver}' by June IS, 
1913. 

Circular 619 — Rack railway material for all 
locks. Class 1, structural material; contractor 
U. S. Steel Products Company. Class 2, 
steel rack castings; R. C. Hoffman & Co., con- 
tractors. Class 3, cast iron and malleable iron 
castings; Ross-Meehan Foundry Co., con- 
tors. Class 4, copper and brass; U. S. Steel 
Products Co., and St. Louis Screw Company, 
contractors. Items 15 and 16, held in abey- 
ance. Class 7, miscellaneous (steel bolts, etc.) 
Oliver Iron & Steel Co., contractors. 

Circular 620 — Lock gate recess covers; U. 
S. Steel Products Co., contractors. It is under- 
stood that four sets of covers have been ship- 
ped out of total of 80 required. Balance of this 
material will be ready for shipment within the 
next few weeks. 

Circular 627, Class 1, Item 1. — 2 miter gate 
moving machines except motors, Wheeling 
Mold and Foundry Co.. contractors. Item 2. 
— 90 miter gate moving machines, except 
motors; award not yet made. Class 2, Item 
1. — 1 miter forcing machine, except motor; 
Richard Manufacturing Co., contractors. 
Item 2. — 45 miter forcing machines, except 
motors; award not yet made. Class 3, Item 
1. — 2 motors for miter gate moving machines; 
award held in abeyance. Item 2. — 90 motors 
for miter gate moving machines; contract not 
yet awarded. Class 4, Item 1. — motor for 
miter forcing machine; General Electric Com- 
pany, contractors. Item 2. — 45 Motors for 
miter forcing machines', award not yet made. 

Circular 63o, Class 1. — Spillway gates, etc.: 
McClintic-Marshall Construction Company, 
contractors. Class 2 — Rising stem gate 
valves, etc.; McClintic-Marshall Construction 
Co., contractors. Class 3 — Fixed irons for 
spillway gates; Excelsior Tool & Machine Co., 
contractors. Class 4 — Roller trains and seal- 
ing devices; Westinghouse Machine Co., con- 
tractors. Class 5 — Railings for spillways; 
Vulcan Rail & Construction Co.. contractors. 
Xo deliveries have yet been made. 

Circular 636-D — Brass nuts, bolts and set 
screws, i Refer to Item 18 of Circular 619). 

Circular 639— Structural steel for decking; 
United States Steel Products Co., contractors. 
No deliveries have yet been made. 

Circular 647 — Copper conductor bars and 
splice bars. Circular published August 24, bids 



opened September 23; award not yet made. 

Cir< ular n48 — Plant and material for hydro- 
electric station. Circular published Septembei 
9; bids to be opened on October 24. 

Circular 649 — Fender chains; bids will be 
opened November 14. 

ilar 650 — Towing locomotives, cir- 
cular issued September 21; bids to be opened 
November 20. 

Specifications have been forwarded to the 
General Purchasing Officer covering snubbing 
posts and washers, bolts and chains, and 
springs for fenders, but the material has not 
yet been advertised. 

Atlantic Division. 
GATUN LOCKS. 

Excavation — Shovel excavation in the locks 
was completed. The total amount of material 
removed amounted to 5,920.085 cubic yards, 
of which 5,038,222 cubic yards were removed 
from the prism. 

Backfill — Backfilling behind the side walls 
of the upper, middle and lower locks, and in 
the center wall of the uper lock, was continued. 
The quantity placed during September aggre- 
gated 1 14,229 cubic yards, increasing the total 
to 798,726 cubic yards. On September 30, 
the backfilling was 49.64 per cent completed. 

Receiving and Issuing Material — The con- 
sumption of rock exceeded the receipts by 8,- 
065 cubic yards and the consumption of ce- 
ment exceeded the receipts by 12,494 barrels. 
The receipts of sand exceeded the consumption 
by 4,370 cubic yards. 

Mixing and Placing Plant — Both plants, 
and all portable mixers, were kept in satis- 
factory operation during the month. 

Power Plant and Pumps — The operation of 
the power plant and pumps was satisfactory. 

Iron and Steel Work — During the month, 
316.7 tons of fixed steel and 205.316 feet of re- 
inforcing rods were placed; 61.1 tons of re- 
inforcing rails and 440 feet of electric return 
track were laid. 

Concrete Work — There was a decrease of 9.- 
630 cubic yards in the amount of concrete laid 
as compared with the figures for the preceding 
month. The daily average for the 25 work- 
ing days was 2,292 cubic yards, as compared 
with a daily average during August of 2,478 
cubic yards. The total amount of concrete 
placed during the month was 57.298 cubic 
yards, including 1,634 cubic yards of large 
stone. Of the total concrete, 2,269.5 cubic 
yards were placed in the upper lock. 14,913.5 
cubic yards in the middle lock and 40,115 
cubic yards in the lower lock The concrete 
work for the entire lock sy'stem was 81 per 
cent completed at the end of September. 

OPERATION OF THE PERMANENT AND AUXILIARY CON- 
CRETE CONSTRUCTION PLANTS. 

Permanent Auxiliary 
Plant. Plant. 



11.29 



8.50 



6.40 
5.00 



2.00 



Length of working day (hours) . . 
Average number of hours per 

day worked, per strand of 

cableway laying concrete and 

large stone (actual working 

time) 

Average number of mixers per 

day 

Average hourly output per mixer 

(actual working time). cu. yds. 63 GI 49.00 
Average amount of concrete and 

large stone laid per hour, per 

strand of cableway (actual 

working tirm-i cu. yds 31.82 

Large stone laid, cu. yds 1 .634 

Concrete laid, cableways. cu. yds. 40.770 

Concrete laid, through chute in- 
to dump cars, cu. yds 5,328 

Concrete laid, derricks, cu. yds 2.966 

Concrete laid, dump cars, cu. yds 5,366 

Concrete laid, portable mixers 1,751.5 

Total amount of concrete and 

large stone laid. cu. yds 47,732 10.083.5 



GATUN DAM. 

Construction during the month increased 
the total fill, as determined by cross sections 
of the material in place, by 456,335 cubit 
yards, making the total amount in place 15,- 
768,127 cubic yards. 

Hydraulic Fill — The dredges increased the 
hydraulic fill by 261,838 cubic yards. The 
total hydraulic fill in place September .50. was 
8,256,166 cubic yards. 

Dry Fill — The material received from the 
Central Division, Mindi, and from steam 
shovels Nos. 116 and 134, amounting to 194,- 
497 cubic yards, was pi. iced on the north and 
south toes of the dam. east and west of the 
spillway, making the total dry fill in place 7,- 
509,961 cubic yards. 

GATUN SPILLWAY. 

Excavation — In preparing foundations for 
the spillway dam, 359 cubic yards of rock and 
217 cubic yards of earth were removed bj 
hand. On September 30, the total spillway 
excavation amounted to 1 ,586, 1 84 cubic yards. 

Concrete — The work of placing concrete was 
continued. The amount placed during the 
month aggregated 3,650 cubic yards, which 
increased the total to 159,381 cubic yards. 
The concrete work for the spillway was 70.4 
per cent completed. 

Hydro-electric Plan! — Excavation work for 
site of the power house was continued, a total 
of 1,210 cubic yards of earth being removed. 
The total excavation for this purpose at the 
close of the month was 21,835 cubic yards. 

HARBOR AND CHANNEL SECTION. 

Excavation below sea level at Mindi — Duriny 
the month two steam shovels removed 17,609 
cubic yards of earth and 56.878 cubic yards of 
rock from the canal prism 

Dredging from the Ocean to Mindi — Five 
dredges removed 380,894 cubic yards of earth 
and 39,540 cubic yards of rock from the canal 
prism. In addition the dredge Caribbean 
removed 39.867 cubic yards of earth from in 
front of dock Xo. 11 and the approach channel. 
On September 30th 40 feet of water could be 
carried from Zero to Zero plus 2,100 feet. iS 
feet to Mile 3 plus 2.S00 feet; 30 feet to Mile 
4 plus 3,750 feet; 20 feet to Mile 5 plus 2,- 
438.9 feet, at the junction with the French 
Canal. 

PORTO BELLO. 
PERFORMANCE OF ROCK CRUSHER PLANT. 

Length of working days — hours S.UO 

Average number of hours worked per day. . 4.31 
Average number of cubic yards per hour of 

working day 221.76 

Average number of cubic yards per working 

hour 411.94 

Maximum day's output, (5 hours 23 minutes) 

cu. yds 2,186.00 

Average day's output (25 days) cu. yds 1,77**. 08 

Average hourly output, (179 hours 59 min- 
utes) cu. yds 246.42 

Total output for the month, cu. yds 44.352.00 

SAND. STONE. AND CEMENT SERVICE. 

In connection with this service, plant 
steamed 6,295 miles, handled 79.5 barges and 
carried 3,120 passengers. 

WEST BREAKWATER, COLON. 

Thirty-four thousand four hundred and 
ninety-four cubic yards of rock were excavated, 
of which amount 33,813 cubic yards were 
placed in the breakwater and 681 cubic yards 
in track fill. The double track trestle was ex- 
tended 513 linear feet. On September 30, the 
trestle extended 7.152 linear feet from shore. 
The total amount of rock dredged and dumped 
on the west breakwater to September 1. 1911, 
was 687,177 cubic yards. During the month 
59.540 cubic yards of rock were dredged and 



62 



THE CANAL RECORD 



Vol. V., No. 8. 



dumped, increasing the total to 726,717 cubic 
yards. The amount of dry fill placed to Oc- 
tober 1, was 488,984 cubic yards. 

NOMBRE DE DIOS. 

During the month 69 barges, containing 33,- 
415 cubic yards of sand, were shipped to Ga- 
tun. 

MUNICIPAL ENGINEERING. 

The reservoirs, water mains, sewers, roads 
and oil pipe lines were maintained and ex- 
tended as required to facilitate construction 
work. 

Central Division. 

During the month of September the total 
amount of material excavated in the Central 
Division was 1,361,445 cubic yards, of which 
274,914 cubic yards were classified as earth 
and 1,086,531 cubic yards as rock. Of this 
quantity, 1,339,437 cubic yards were re- 
moved by steam shovels, 736 cubic yards by 
bucket crane, and contractors removed 10 000 
cubic yards by sluicing and 11 ,272 cubic yards 
by hand. The total, 1,361,445 cubic yards, 
consisted of primary excavation for the canal 
prism. 

The daily average number of steam shovels 
at work during the month was 42.00, and the 
total number of shovel days was 1 ,050. as com- 
pared with 40.66 at work during the month of 
August with 1.098 shovel days. 

For comparison with the work done by 
steam shovels during the corresponding month 
of the previous year, the following table has 
been prepared: 



Period. 


Excava- 
ted by 
shovels. 


Classification of 
material. 


«oc 

O ' 


a 
-s 

25 

25 


si 

S3 a 




Rock. 


Earth. 




1910: 
Sent. . . 

1911: 
Sept. . . 


Cu. Yds. 
1.572.064 

1,339.437 


Cu. Yds. 
1.114.765 

1.075.211 


Cu. Yds. 
457,299 

264.226 


46.92 
42.00 


C. Y. 

1.340.20 

1,275.65 



Rainfall at Empire: 1910, 8.99 ins.: 1911. 5.46 ins. 

The above table shows the average output 
per shovel to be 4.82 per cent greater in Sep- 
tember, 1910, than in the corresponding month 
of the present year. 

The total amount of material excavated 
from the prism in the Culebra section of the 
Central Division inSeptembcr, 1911, or 1,340,- 
173 cubic yards, was the greatest record in 
that section for the month of September, the 
previous high record having been in Sep- 
tember, 1910, when 1,339,948 cubic yards were 
removed. 

The total estimated amount of material to 
be removed in the Central Division, according 
to revised estimate of July 1, 1911, was 101,- 
891,296 cubic yards, and up to October 1, 1911, 
81,524,091 cubic yards had been removed, 
leaving 20,277,205 cubic yards to be removed 
in order to complete all excavation in the Cen- 
tral Division. From these figures it will be 
seen that 80.08 per cent of all excavation in the 
Central Division had been accomplished up to 
the close of the month of September, 1911, 
and 19.92 per cent remained uncompleted. 

Considering the two sections which com- 
pose the Central Division, the excavation 
completed and that to be completed at the 
close of September operations was as follows: 

CULEBRA SECTION. Cu. Yds. 

Completed 69,635,273 

To be completed 19.808,732 

CHAGRES SECTION. Cu. Yds. 

Completed 11,888,818 

To be completed 468,473 

From the above figures it will be seen that 
the Culebra Section, locally known as "Cule- 
bra Cut," is 77.85 per cent completed with 



22.15 per cent to be completed, the Chagres 
Section is 96.21 per cent completed with 3.79 
per cent to be completed. 

During the month 33,117 cubic yards of 
material were dumped in the embankment for 
the new roadbed for the relocation of the Pan- 
ama railroad. The total amount of spoil from 
the Central Division used for this purpose at 
the close of the month was 3,954,428 cubic 
yards. The Central Division also delivered at 
Gatun 227,304 cubic yards of rock and earth 
for use in the construction of the dam, making 
the total for this purpose at the end of Sep- 
tember, 4,456,271 cubic yards. 

The daily average number of laborers at 
work on the whole Division during the month 
was 7,826, and the daily average number of 
gold employes was 783. 

Pacific Division. 
DISTRICT NO. 1 — LOCKS AND DAMS. 

Excavation — The total excavation during 
the month amounted to 136,681 cubic yards. 

Filling and Embankment — During Sep- 
tember, 4,052 cubic yards of d.y filling were 
added to the prism of the west dam at Pedro 
Miguel, increasing the total amount of mater- 
ial in place at the close of the month to 304,- 
981 cubic yards. The backfill at Pedro Miguel 
was increased by 29,382 cubic yards, the total 
in place at the end of the month amounting to 
349,500 cubic yards. 

At Miraflores, 34,480 cubic yards were 
added to the dry fill in the toes and 6,409 
cubic yards to the hydraulic fill in the core of 
the west dam, making the totals at the end of 
the month 977,597 cubic yards and 639.09S 
cubic yards, respectively, The backfill was 
increased by 22,480 cubic yards, the total ag- 
gregating 203,538 cubic yards at the end of the 
month. 

Pedro MiguelLocks — The genera! backfilling 
behind the west wall was continued, as was al- 
so the filling in of the middle wall with screen- 
ings and sand by means of chamber cranes. 
The fourth arch at the south end of lock walls 
was poured during the month. The amount of 
iron placed in the masonry aggregated 173,- 
132 pounds. 

OPERATION OF THE PERMANENT AND AUXILIARY CON- 
CRETE CONSTRUCTION PLANTS AT PEDRO MIGUEL. 



Auxiliary plant consisted of three 2-cubic yard mix- 
ers, and a daily average of 2 76; three i-cubic yard 
mixers, daily average 1.64; and five locomotive cranes 
or derricks, daily average 4.32 units, ^-cubic yard mix 
ers discharged directly into forms. 

Concrete Work — The total amount of con- 
crete and large stone laid at Pedro Miguel was 
15,379 cubic yards as compared with 20,736 
cubic yards during August. The concrete was 
placed as follows: 1,220 cubic yards in the 
floors; 109 cubic yards in the southwest wing 
wall; 293 cubic yards in the northwest wing 
wall; 3,314 cubic yards in the east wall; 4,182 
cubic yards in the west wall; and 6,261 cubic 
yards in the center wa 11. 

Miraflores Locks — The McClintic-Marshall 
Construction Company advanced the erection 
of berm crane "E" sufficiently to permit the 
installation of electrical equipment. Dry ex- 
cavation was continued in the lower lock, 
eight steam shovels being employed. The 
backfilling of the. east and west walls and the 
filling on the east and west toes of the west 
dam were continued. Work on concrete caisson 
shells for foundation piers of the upper guide 
wall was continued. During the month, the 
amount of iron placed in the masonry aggre- 
gated 47S.355 pounds. 

Concrete Work — The total amount of con- 
crete and large stone laid was 56,083 cubic 
yards as compared with 57 003 cubic yards 
during the month of August. The concrete 
was placed as follows: 4,037 cubic yards in 
the east wall; 19,238 cubic yards in the west 
wall; 29,315 cubic yards in the center wall and 
3,493 cubic yards in the floors. 

OPERATION OF THE PERMAN ENT AND AUXILIARY CON- 
CRETE CONSTRUCTION PLANTS AT MIRAFLORES. 



Permanent Auxiliary 
Plant. I Plant. 



Length of working day (hours). . 

Average number of hours per 
day worked laying concrete 
and large stone (actual work- 
ing time) 

Average number of mixers per 
day 

Average hourly output per 
mixer (actual working time).. . 

Average amount of concrete and 
large stone laid per hour, per 
chamber crane (actual working 
time) 



8.00 I 



8.00 



2.57 



Cu. Yds. 



4.20 

Cu. Yds. 

31.20 



Large stone laid. 
Concrete laid . . . 



Total concrete laid . 



13 203.00 



13.203.00 



Permanent plant consisted of two chamber cranes, 
working intermittently. 



[Permanent Auxiliary 
Plant. t Plant. 



Length of working day (hours) . . 

Average number of hours per 
day worked laying concrete 
and large stone (actual work- 
ing time) 

Average number of mixers per 
day 



Average hourly output per mixer 
(actual working time) 

Average amount of concrete and 
large stone laid per hour, per 
berm, or chamber crane (actu- 
al working time} . . ; 



Large stone laid. 
Concrete laid . . . 



Cu. 



8.00 



6.30 



5.32 
Yds. 



Total concrete laid 52.903.00 ' 3,180 00 



Cu 



8.00 



7.22 



4.84 
Yds. 



52,903 00 3,180.00 



Permanent plant consisted of three berm and two 
chamber cranes. 

Auxiliary plant consisted of two 2-cubic yard mixers 
daily, and four 1-cubic yard mixers, daily average 
2.85. J-yard mixers discharged directly into forms. 

DISTRICT NO. 2 — DREDGING. 

The following is a statement of the output 
of the five dredges which were in operation 
during the month, and of the amount of ma- 
terial excavated hydraulically: 





Type. 


Work. 


PLANT. 


Total. 




Dredge. 


Earth. 


Rock. 


Earth 


Rock. 


Remarks. 




Dipper 

Ladder... 
Ladder.. . . 
Ladder.. . . 
Suction... . 


Cu. Yds. 

7 SS3 
79.53b 
90.315 

5.710 
259.755 


Cu. Yds. 
10.065 

3.W2 


Cu. Yds. 
6>00 
7.561 


Cu. Yds. 
6,800 


Cu. Yds. 

32 44S 
90 971 
90 315 

12,1150 
259.755 
















6,i50 














scow measurement 




443.191 
•70 2h9 


21,187 


14.361 


6.800 


4S< 539 
70 2S9 
























613 4-0 


21.1S7 


14 =61 1 6.800 


555 828 













♦Excavated from Canal prism, south of Miraflores lock site. 



October IS, 1911. 



THE CANAL RECORD 



63 



Chame Sand Excavation — Approximately 
40.1 IS cubic yards of sand were excavated at 
Punta Chame' and delivered at Balboa. 

DISTRICT SO. 3 — MUNICIPAL AND SANITARY 
ENGINEERING. 

The reservoirs, water mains, sewers, roads 
and oil pipe lines were maintained and ex- 
tended as required to facilitate construction 
work 

DISTRICT NO. 4 — ANCON QUARRY. 
PERFORMANCE OF ROCK CRUSHER PLANT. 

Hours. 

Length of working day (hours) 8.00 

Average number of hours per day (actual 

working time) 7.17 

Average number of cubic yards crushed per 

hour of working day 266.47 

Average number of cubic yards crushed per 

working hour 324.37 

Total output for the month. cubic yards. . . . 58,290.00 
Relocation of Panama Railroad. 
During the month 353 210 cubic yards of 
material were excavated, increasing the total 
excavation at the close of the month to S.57*.- 
228 cubic yards, and 388.130 cubic yards of 
material were placed in embankment, increas- 
ing the total for this purpose to 14,387,082 
cubic yards. 

The average daily number of steam shovels 
at work was 9.44 and the total number of work- 
ing days was 25. 

For comparison with the work done by 
steam shovelsduring theprecedingmonth, and 
during the corresponding month of the pre- 
vious year, the following table has been pre- 
pared : 



Period. 



1910: 

Sept . 

1911: 

Aug... 

Sept... 



Excava- 
ted by 
shovels. 



Classification of 
material. 



Rock. 



,7 = 



Earth. 



Cu. Yds. 

i 194.371 



Cu.Yds. Cu.Yds. 
111. 490 B2.881 



359 3<3 
343.770 



242.331 
1S6.I55 



117.032 

157.615 



5.62 



9.41 
9.44 



> H 

<- 

c. V. 

25 1,383 

27 1.415 
25 1.45f 



Xo temporary trestle was driven during the 
month. Work on bridges and culverts was 
continued. No permanent track was laid dur- 
ing the month, the amount of 70-pound and 
90-pound track remaining at 134,698 linear 
feet and 42,043 linear feet respectively, as pre- 
viously reported. The force averaged 2.172 
men, in addition to those employed by con- 
tractors. 

Quartermaster's Department. 
LABOR. 

Two hundred and thirty-nine laborers were 
received during the month, distributed as fol- 
lows: Central Division, 199; Pacific Division, 
40. This practically completed the order for 
one thousand men, placed with the Recruit- 
ing Agent in Barbados in June, and instruc- 
tions were given to discontinue further ship- 
ments 

QUARTERS. 

The number of West Indians occupying 
Commission quarters was increased by 600 
during the month, making 1,300 additional 
men quartered since August 1, 1911. 

Accommodations for 250 laborers were pre- 
pared at Naos I-land. Over 100 laborers are 
quartered at that point. 

The settlement at B. >hto has been abandoned 
and the District Quartermaster instructed to 
transfer the four American families now at 
that place to other points. 

BUILDINGS. 

Work on the Tenth Infantry camp at Las 
Cascadas and White House was completed at 
the end of the month. The regiment failed to 



arrive in September, as originally scheduled. 
Besides the original work contemplated one 
additional range closet was erected and a tem- 
porary corral put up for the public animals 
attached to this organization. 

MATERIAL AND St PPLIES. 
The value of material received from the 
United Statesduring the month was S58 1,348.- 
64. Supplies were delivered by 2<8 steamers. 
The total weight of cargo aggregated 29,006 
tons, exclusive of 787, 634 feet B. M. Douglas fir 
lumber, 894,853 feet B. M. yellow pine 
lumber, 70,214 feet B. M. white oak lum- 
ber, 165 pieces of piling and 38,440 cross 
tics. There has been an unusual demand for 
all classes of lumber and piling during the past 
three months, due to dock work at Colon and 
trestle work in the Atlantic and Central Divi- 
sions. 

Subsistence Department. 

The operation of the European laborers' 
messes, the colored laborers' kitchens and the 
line hotels showed a net profit of $4,198.78 
There was a net profit on hotels, penitentiary, 
tugs and dredges of S89.72. The operation of 
the Hotel Tivoli showed a net loss of $1,582.- 
19, which was due to an equipment charge 
amounting to $2,461.13. September was the 
first month since November, 1910, that the 
Tivoli Hotel showed a loss. The net profit on 
subsistence operations was S2.706.31. 

Department of Civil Administration. 
COURTS. 

During the month 19 civil and 35 criminal 
cases were disposed of in the Supreme and 
Circuit Courts, and 69 civil and 585 criminal 
cases in the District Courts. 

DIVISION OF POSTS, CUSTOMS AN*D REVENUES. 

Money order sales for September amounted 
to S45U99.57, and the fees to $2,038.28. 
Receipts from stamp and card sales, and news- 
paper postage aggregated $7,341.23. The 
total collection of revenues made by the divi- 
sion was $24,690.48, and the collection on 
account of court fines, costs and fees S2.459 03. 

Twenty-six vessels entered at and 25 vessels 
cleared from the port of Ancon; and 20 ves- 
vcsls entered at and 21 vessels cleared from 
the port of Cristobal. 

DIVISION OF POLICE AND PRISONS. 

The total number of persons arrested was 
592, of whom 547 were men and 45 women, 
representing an increase of 44 as compared 
with the month of August, 31 over July, and 
92 compared with the month of September a 
year ago. Twenty-two nations, or 49 separate 
states and dependencies, were represented. 
& ven convicts were committed to the peni- 
tentiary, and 16 were discharged, leaving 133 
convicts in confinement at the close of the 
month. The cost of guarding and subsisting 
the convicts was $2,678.42, and the value of 
their work on Canal Zone roads $1,815.30. 

DIVISION OF FIRE PROTECTION. 

Twelve fires were reported in the Canal 
Zone during the month, as compared with 
eight in August. The damage to Commission 
property was $24.50. 

DIVISION OF PUBLIC WORKS. 

In the city of Panama the average daily 
consumption of water was 1,316,359 gallons, 
and in Colon. 957.305 gallons. 

The usual inspection and maintenance 
work of this division was performed during the 
month. 

Department of Sanitation. 

The total number of deaths from all causes 
among employees was 57. These wore divided 



as follows: From disease, 42, and from vio- 
lence, 15, giving the annual average per thous- 
and of 10.63 and 3.80 respectively. 

The annual average death rate per thousand 
among employees for the month of September 
in previous years since American occupation 
was as follows: 

1904 14.31 

1905 32.00 

1906 57.34 

1907 28 63 

1908 12.78 

1909 12.76 

1910 11.47 

The annual average death rate per thousand 
in the cities of Panama, Colon and the Canal 
Zone, including both employees and non- 
employees, was 21.56. 

The annual average death rate per thousand 
for the month of September among the same 
class of population for previous years was as 
follows: 

1905 52.31 

1906 54 54 

1907 32.93 

1908 24.91 

1909 19.01 

1910 21.60 

Segregating the whites from the blacks, the 
annual average death rate per thousand from 
disease among employes was: For whites, 5.95 
and for blacks, 12.24, giving a general average 
for disease of 10.63. For the same month dur- 
ing 1909, the annual average death rate per 
thousand from disease among whites was 11.- 
95, and blacks, 8.25, giving a general average 
of 9.08; and for the same month during 1910, 
whites, 3.58, and blacks, 9.46, giving a general 
average of 7.89. 

Among employes during the month, the 
deaths from the principal diseases were as 
follows: Chronic nephritis, 4; dysentery, 
clynical, 1; haemoglobinuric fever, 3; lobar 
pneumonia, 14; tuberculosis, 5; typhoid fever, 
1; leaving 14 deaths from all other diseases, 
and 15 deaths from external violence. 

No cases of yellow fever, small pox, or 
plague originated on or were brought to the 
Isthmus during the month. 

Respectfully, 
Geo. W. Goethals, Chairman. 



Family Quarters. 

Applications for married quarters were on file on 
October 1, as follows: 



District. 



List 
Xo 1. 



Ancon 

Ancon Hospital . 

Balboa 

Bas Obispo 

Corozal 

Cristobal 

Culebra 

Empire 

Gatun 

Gorgona 

Las Cascadas . . . 
Pedro Miguel . . . 

Porto Bello 

Tabernilla 

Toro Point 



Total. 



(I 



List 
No. 2. 



34 (3) 
6 (2) 
28 (6) 
26 (3) 
38 (1) 

111 
25 (3) 
63 (33) 

120(42) 

74 (33) 

25 (1) 

47(12) 

9 (7) 

6 (2) 



17 (1) 613(148) 



Note — The figures in parenthesis show the number 
of applicants already occupying regular or nonhouse- 
keeping family quarters at stations other than those 
at which applications are filed. 



Band Concert. 

A concert will be given by the Isthmian Canal Com- 
mission Band at Culebra, C. Z., on Sunday. October 
22. 1911. at 5.45 p. m. 

A concert will be given at Corozal, October 29, at 
7.30 p.m. 



Sailing of Cristobal. 



The sailing date of the steamship Cristobal has been 
changed from 5.00 p. m. Sunday. October 22. 1911 to 
S.nOp.m. Saturday. October 21. 1911. 



64 



THE CANAL RECORD 



Vol. V., No. 8. 



OFFICIAL CIRCULARS. 



November 3, a Holiday. 

Culebra, C. Z., October 16. 1911. 
Circular No. 414: 

Friday, November 3, 1911. the anniversary of the 
Independence of the Republic of Panama, will be ob- 
served as a holiday in the Canal Zone, and. as far as pos- 
sible, all public business will be suspended on that day. 
Geo. W. Goeihals, 
Chairman and Chief Engineer. 



Employment of McClintic-Marshall Men. 

Culebra. C. Z, October 12. 1911. 
Heads of Departments and Divisions: 

Ex-employees of the McClintic-Marshall Construc- 
tion Company should not be employed by the Isthmian 
Canal Commission or the Panama Railroad Company 
unless they can show clearances from the McClintic- 
Marshall Construction Company indicating that there 
is no objection to their employment on the Isthmus. 
Geo. W. Goethals, 
Chairman and Chief Engineer. 



Acting Chief Quarantine and Health Officers. 
Ancon, C. Z. October 10. 1911. 
Special Order: 

During the absence of Dr. J. C. Perry. Dr. Fleetwood 
Gruver will act as Chief Quarantine Officer, signing all 
correspondence as "for and in the absence of Chief 
Quarantine Officer." 

Dr. M. E. Conner in addition to his other duties will 
act as Health Officer, Panama, signing all papers as "for 
and in the absence of Health Officer." 
By direction of Chief Sanitary Officer. 

John L. Phillips, 
Assistant Chief Sanitary Officer. 



23.990 pieces lumber. 2,525 pieces switch ties, 4 pieces 
spud timber, for stock. 

Alcana, October 10, from New York, with 111,868 
bags cement for Atlantic and Pacific Divisions. 

Metapan. October 12, from New York, with 250 cases 
ash cans, for stock; 26 pieces rock skips for Atlantic Di- 
vision. 

Cristobal, October 12, from New York, with 132,840 
bags cement, for Atlantic and Pacific Divisions. 

Alenas, October 12, from New Orleans, with 6.270 
pieces lumber. 2. 143 bales straw. 454 bales hay . for stock; 
1 ,500 pieces cross arms, for Panama Railroad Company; 
99 pieces piling, for Atlantic Division; 6 cases packing, 
for Mechanical Division; 4 cases school supplies for 
Department of Civil Administration. 

.4;/i'aKca, October 12, from New York, with 17 crates 
galvanized pails, 1 23 kegs bolts and rivets, 1 5 cases paper 
tablets, 20 cases black lead, 25 cases machinery, 20 cases 
rubber hose. 100 cases candles, 100 cases laundry soap. 
350 rolls roofing paper. 15 bundles straw board, 17 
bundles life-preservers. 7 cases paint, 100 kegs paint. 
52 cases castings. 15 packages D. bars, 125 pieces iron 
pipe, for stock; 8 pieces dredge bucket, 75 pieces wheel- 
barrows, for Pacific Division: 100 kegs rivets. 10 cases 
electrical supplies, 25 cases rubber boots, for Atlantic 
Division; 22 cases metal polish, for Department of Civil 
Administration; 573 bundles castings, 175 bundles car 
springs, 158 barrels sand. 6 cases crane parts, for Me- 
chanical Division; and a miscellaneous carge, the whole 
consisting of 2,307 packages, weighing 252 tons. 



Acting Chief Clerk. 

Cristobal.C.Z., October 12, 1911. 
During the absence on leave of Mr. Wm. F. Shipley, 
effective today. Mr. Wm. T. McCormack will act as 
chief clerk of the Commissary and Subsistence Depart- 
ments. Eugene T. Wilson, 

Subsistence Officer. 



Sale of Public Buildings. 

Office of the Chief Quartermaster, 

Culebra, C. Z.. October 9. 1911. 
Sealed proposalsfor the purchase of any or all of sixty- 
five (65) buildings located at Bohio, Tabernilla and San 
Pablo will be received here until 3 p.m.. Saturday, Oc- 
tober 28, 1911, and then opened. List of buildings and 
full information will be furnished on application to any 
District Quartermaster or to this office. Proposals 
should be accompanied by certified check, post office 
money order or cash for 5 per cent of amount of 
bid. Successful bidders will be given the Isthmian 
Canal Commission freight rate on material contained 
in buildings purchased. Envelops containing proposals 
should be endorsed, "Proposals for the purchase of build- 
ings." and addressed to Col. C. A. Devol, Chief Quar- 
termaster. Culebra, C. Z. 



Misdirected Letters. 

Ancon, C. Z., October 18. 1911. 
The following insufficiently addressed letters, origi- 
nating in the United States and its possissions, have 
been received in the office of the Director of Posts, and 
may be secured upon request of the addressee: 



Aiken, J. 
Blake. Master Arter 
Critchlow. H. T. 
Cunningham, Earl 
Ellis, Miss Leontine 
Espie, L 
Ford. A. P. 
Harrold. Wm. (2) 
Hartenstine. Charles 
Hershey. A. D. I 
Jay, William C.l 
Jones, F. R. 



Knight. Miss Gwendolyn 
McGowan, E. P. (2) 
McKenzie, Zachariah 
Moor, Crawford 
Morris, Miss Mable 
Oaks, Major John C. 
Ortiz, Don. Carlos 
Peterson. U. C. 
Ricard. R. 

Robinson. Mrs. Charles E. 
Sexton, William 
Woods. Louis F. 



LETTERS UNCALLED FOR OCTOBER 11. 



Baker, William H. 
Barker, Herbert 
Barrett, Joseph 
Bragg. C. L. 
Cleveland, Houston 
Dagley, F. H. 
DeSuze, V. G. 
Diamond, R 
Evans, Fred 
Fonda, Geo. H. 
Gray. Dr. 
Green. B. J. A. 
Hindyside, Mrs. Lemor 
Holt, Mack 



Kieman, J. C. 
Maxwell, Berton H. 
McCaslin, O. W. 
McDonald, Mrs. Iris 
McDonald. Daniel B. (2) 
Mitchell, W. H. 
Mitchell, J. A. 
Morris, Miss Mable 
Payiablas, George 
Porter, F. W. 
Smart. Fred 
Spencer, J. Garfield 
Will. Jas. C. 



Tide Table. 

The following table shows the time of high and low 
tides at Panama for the week ending October 25, 1911 
(75th meridian time) : 



Supplies for the Canal. 

The following steamers, with supplies for the Isth- 
mian Canal Commission, arrived at the ports of Cris- 
tobal, Colon and Balboa during the week ending Oc- 
tober 14: 

Clyde, October 8. from New York, with 3 cases insu- 
lated tape, for Mechanical Division. 

Riverside. October 10, from Hoquiam. Wash., with 



Date. 


High. 


Low. 


High. 


Low. 




A.M. 
1.10 
2.10 
2.53 
3.35 
4.10 
4.50 
5.23 


A.M. 
7.30 
8.20 
9.05 
9.45 
10.25 
11.05 
1 1 . 40 


P.M. 
1.45 
2.35 
3.20 
4.00 
4.40 
5.15 
5.50 


P.M. 
7 50 




8.40 




9.25 




10.05 




10.45 




11.20 











Stages of the Chagres. 

Maximum heights of the Chagres River for the week 
ending midnight, Saturday, October 14. 1911. All 
heights are in feet above mean sea level. 







Station. 








Day and Date. 


Vigia. 


3 


C4 
O 

E 


6 


s . 

3,3 






















< 


O 


a 


OJ 




Sun.. Oct. 8... 


128.2 


94.2 


47.4 


16.3 


16 


1 


Mon., Oct. 9... 


129.2 


94.9 


47.9 


16.5 


16 


2 


Tues., Oct. 10.. 


126.9 


93.5 


47.3 


16.3 


16 


2 


Wed., Oct. 11. . 


126.3 


92.8 


47.2 


16.2 


16 





Thurs.,Oct. 12. 


128.0 


94.0 


46.8 


15.8 


15 


8 


Fri., Oct. 13. .. 


126.8 


93.4 


46.5 


15.7 


15 


6 


Sat.. Oct. 14.. . 


127.0 


93.3 


46. 1 


15.4 


15 


4 


Height of low 














water 


125.0 


92.0 


44.0 









Rainfall from October 1 to 14 


. 1911, 


Inclusive. 


Stations. 


.5 

S >• 

■ 5 a 

1"° 

y, c 
a o 

s 


Q 




Pacific Section 

Ancon 


Ins. 
4.47 
2.58 
1.04 
1.19 
2.34 

2.64 
2.91 
2.15 
1.46 
1.75 
.92 
1.34 
1.10 
1.41 
2.09 

1.45 
1.67 
2.09 
2.67 
1.30 


9 

9 
5 

5 
5 

1 

1 

1 

6 

3 

10 

12 

10 

3 

6 

12 
13 
12 
2 
12 


Ins. 
5.68 
3.86 




2.76 




5.50 




9.35 


Central Section — 


9.65 




10.60 




8.91 




5.65 




4.65 




3.52 




3.73 




3.30 




5.73 




5.20 


Atlantic Section — 


6.70 




4.50 




5.72 




ts.oo 




4.21 







*Standard rain gage — readings at 5 p. m. daily. 
Automatic rain gage at unstarred stations — value 
midnight to midnight. tTo 5 p. m.. October 13. 



MOVEMENT OF OCEAN VESSELS. 

The following is a list of the sailings of the Panama 
Railroad Steamship Company; of the Royal Mail 
Steam Packet Company; of the Hamburg-American 
Line, and of the United Fruit Company's Line; the 
Panama Railroad Company's dates being subject to 
change. 

NEW YORK TO CRISTOBAL. 

Advance P. R. R .WednesdayOct. 18 

Panama P. R. R.Tuesday.. .Oct. 24 

Allianca P. R. R .Tuesday.. .Oct. 31 

CRISTOBAL TO NEW YORK. 

Colon P. R. R .Tuesday.. .Oct. 24 

Advance P. R. R .Monday. . .Oct. 30 

Panama P. R. R.Sunday.. . .Nov. 5 

Allianca P. R. R .Saturday . .Nov. 11 

NEW YORK TO COLON. 

Zacapa U. F. C. Thursday.. Oct. 12 

Prinz Eitel Friedrich H.-A Friday Oct. 13 

Atrato R. M.... Saturday.. Oct. 14 

Almirante U. F. C. . Thursday. . Oct. 19 

Prinz August Wilhelm.. . .H.-A. . . .Saturday. .Oct. 21 

Santa Marta U. F. C. Thursday.. Oct. 26 

Prinz Sigismund H.-A.. . .Friday Oct. 27 

Thames R. M.. . . Saturday . . Oct. 28 

Metapan U. F. C..Thursday...Nov. 2 

Prinz Joachim H.-A . .Saturday. . .Nov. 4 

Zacapa U. F. C.Thursday.. .Nov. 9 

Prinz Eitel Friedrich H.-A . .Friday Nov. 10 

Trent R. M.. .Saturday. . .Nov. 11 

Almirante U. F. C.Thursday.. .Nov. 16 

Prinz August Wilhelm H.-A.. . Saturday ... Nov. 18 

Santa Marta U. F. C.Thursday.. .Nov. 23 

Prinz Sigismund H.-A Friday Nov. 24 

Oruba R. M . .Saturday.. .Nov. 25 

Metapan U. F. C.Thursday.. .Nov. 30 

Prinz Joachim H.-A . . Saturday . . . Dec. 2 

Zacapa U. F. C.Thursday. ..Dec. 7 

Prinz Eitel Friedrich H.-A . .Friday Dec 8 

Magdalena R. M . . Saturday . . . Dec. 9 

Almirante U. F. C.Thursday Dec. 14 

Prinz August Wilhelm. . . .H.-A. . .Saturday.. .Dec. 16 

Santa Marta U. F. C..Thursday...Dec. 21 

Prinz Sigismund H.-A . . . Friday Dec. 2 

COLON TO NEW YORK. 

Metapan U. F. C. . Thursday .. Oct. 19 

Prinz Joachim H.-A Tuesday.. .Oct. 24 

Zacapa U. F. C. Thursday.. Oct. 26 

Prinz Eitel Friedrich H.-A Saturday ..Oct. 28 

Trent R. M . .. Tuesday ... Oct. 31 

Almirante U. F. C .Thursday. .Nov. 2 

Pjinz August Wilhelm H.-A Tuesday.. .Nov. 7 

Prinz Sigismund H.-A Saturday. .Nov. 11 

Oruba R. M . . .Tuesday. . .Nov. 14 

Metapan U. F. C.Thursday.. .Nov. 16 

Prinz Joachim H.-A . .Tuesday.. . .Nov. 21 

Zacapa U.F. C.Thursday . ..Nov. 23 

Prinz Eitel Friedrich H.-A . .Saturday. . .Nov. 25 

Magdalena R. M . . Tuesday. . . . Nov. 28 

Almirante U. F. C.Thursday. . . Nov. 30 

Prinz August Wilhelm. .. .H.-A . .Tuesday. .. .Dec. 5 

Santa Marta U. F. C.Thursday. . . Dec. 7 

Prinz Sigismund H.-A. . . Saturday . . . Dec. 9 

Clyde R. M. .Tuesday Dec. 12 

Metapan U. F. C.Thursday. . . Dec. 14 

Prinz Joachim H.-A . .Tuesday.. . .Dec. 19 

Zacapa U. F. C.Thursday.. .Dec. 21 

NEW ORLEANS TO COLON. 

Parismina U.F. C. Wednesday .Oct. 11 

Turrialba U. F. C. Saturday. .Oct. 14 

Abangarez U. F. C. Saturday ...Oct. 21 

Cartago U. F. C. Wednesday.Oct. 25 

Atenas U. F.C.Saturday. ..Oct. 28 

Turrialba U. F. C. .Saturday. .Nov. 4 

Heredia U. F. C. . Wednesday.Nov. 4 

Abangarez U. F. C . .Saturday . . Nov. 11 

Cartago U. F. C. Wednesday.Nov. 15 

COLON TO NEW ORLEANS. 

Parismina U. F. C. . Thursday. . Oct. 19 

Atenas U.F. C. Thursday.. Oct. 19 

Carrillo U. F. C. Thursday.. Oct. 26 

Turrialba U. F. C.Thursday. . Oct. 26 

Cartago U. F. C.Thursday.. Nov. 2 

Abangarez U. F. C.Thursday.. Nov. 2 

Tivives U. F. C.Thursday.. Nov. 9 

Atenas U. F. C. .Thursday.. Nov. 9 

Hamburg-American steamers leave Colon for New 
York via Kingston at 10 a. m. on sailing dates. The 
Prinz August Wilhelm and Prinz Joachim call at 
Santiago de Cuba, on both outward and homeward 
voyages. 

Royal Mail steamers leave for New York on alter- 
nate Tuesdays, at 10 a. m.; for Southampton on alter- 
nate Tuesdays at 10 a. m. 

United Fruit Company's ships for New Orleans 
direct, leave on Thursdays at 3 p. m. ; ships for New 
Orleans in the coastwise service on Thursdays at 4 p. m. ; 
ships for New York via Kingston on Thursdays at 11 
a. m.; for Bocas del Toro on Mondays at 6 p. m. 



CANAL 




RECORD 



ANCON, CANAL ZONE, WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 25, 1911. No. 9. 



Volume V. 



The Canal Record 

Published weekly under the authority and supervision of 
the Isthmian Canal Commission. 



The Canal Record is issued free of charge, one copy 
each, to all employes of the Commission and Panama 
Railroad Company whose names are on the gold roll. 
Extra copies and back numbers can be obtained from the 
news stands of the Panama Railroad Company for five 
cents each. 

Adress all Communications 

THE CANAL RECORD. 

Ancon, Canal Zone, 

Isthmus of Panama. 

No communication, either for Publication or requesting 
information, wilt recti:? attention unless signed with the 
full name and address of the writer. 

NOTES OF PROGRESS. 



Contracts for Lock Operating Materials. 

After undergoing tests in the States, at the 
plant of the manufacturer, the two machines 
for operating the cylindrical valves of the 
locks have been approved, and the makers, 
The Wheeling Mold and Foundry Company, 
have been awarded the contract for the whole 
number of machines necessary, 118 in all. 
During the manufacture some minor changes 
were made with a resulting economy of six 
dollars on each machine, the contract cost 
per machine now being S875. a total of S103,- 
250. A contract for 12 auxiliary valve mach- 
ines has been let to the same manufacturer. 

Three bids were received for the copper 
conductor rail from which the towing loco- 
motives for the locks will collect electric cur- 
rent, and the lowest, that of the Wheeling 
Mold and Foundry Company. 8166,045.63, 
has been accepted. The rail will be made by 
the extrusion process. It will be a modified 
"T" section with straight sides and a return 
at the base. A cross section looks like two 
capital "L's" placed back to back. It will be 
2J inches wide at the base, 3§ inch leg, and 
will weigh 6.07 pounds per foot. It will be 
made in sections 22 J feet long, and 127,000 
linear feet will be required. 

The contract for trial motors for the miter 
gate forcing machines has been let to the 
Allis-Chalmers Company. If these motjrs 
prove satisfactory upon test 42 more may be 
purchased. 

Hydraulic Excavation in Pacific Entrance. 

At the southern end of the Miraflores lock 
pit a barrier of earth separates the pit from the 
Pacific waters in the channel which has been 
dredged from Balboa to this point. A mile 
below this barrier, a cofferdam is being thrown 
across the channel and when it is completed 
the water within the lagoon thus formed will 
be pumped out and the present barrier and the 
area between it and the new one- will be exra- 
vated to 45 feet below mean sealevel, with a 
bottom width of 500 feet. Most of the exca- 
vation will be made hydraulically, by the use 



of the monitors which are now employed in 
the southern end of the present pit. The new 
cofferdam, which lies to the south of the cen- 
tral pumping station, will not interfere with 
its tidal water supply or with the diversion of 
the Rio Grande. The silt pumped out of the 
new excavation will be used mostly to fill in 
the swamp in front of Corozal, extending as 
far south as Diablo Hill. Watertight fence 
will be built along the western edge of the 
swamp, to retain the water pumped in until 
the sediment deposits. 

Work on the new cofferdam has so far ad- 
vanced that the trestle, which forms its 
nucleus, will be completed by November 1. 
The greatest depth of the channel at this point 
now is 23 feet. Spoil from the northern end of 
Miraflores pit will then be dumped on both 
sides of the trestle, to form a dam several feet 
higher than high tide, with a top width of not 
less than 30 feet. This will be the last barrier 
between the locks and the Pacific. When the 
locks and the channel excavation between 
them and the cofferdam are completed, water 
will be let into the space south of the locks 
and the cofferdam will be removed by dredges. 



The Atlantic Entrance. 

In the subaqueous excavation of the At- 
lantic entrance channel, the portion from the 
initial point (Mile 0) to Mile 2 has been com- 
pleted. The depth of the channel is 41 feet 
below mean sealevel, the bottom width is 500 
feet and the slope of the sides, 1 on 3. In the 
remainder, from Mile 2 to Mile 6, the depth 
at present varies from 40 to 20 feet, decreas- 
ing asthechannel approaches Mile 5i, which 
is at Mindi. Between the initial point and 
Mindi, dredges have removed approximately 
23,000,000 cubic yards of soft clay and rock. 
On account of silting, the net excavation now 
amounts to some 14,000,000 cubic yards. 

The completion of the work of the two 70- 
ton steamshovels engaged at Mindi, about 
the first of January, will mark the end of dry 
excavation in the canal prism in the Atlantic 
Division. Excavation thereafter in the por- 
tion between Mindi and Gatun will be by 
dredges. The pipeline dredge Sandpiper is 
already making its way from Gatun toward 
the shovel pit at Mindi. in accordance with 
this program. 

Zone Automobile Fire Apparatus. 

Bids will be opened on October 30, at the 
Washington office for two fully equipped auto- 
mobile combination fire engine and hose 
wagons for the Canal Zone Fire Department. 
one each for Ancon and Cristobal. 

They will be of tin latest and most ap- 
proved design, and with material ami work- 
manship of the highest quality. The wheel 
base will be not less than 144 inches, so con- 
structed as to facilitate turning in a short 
space and to give proper distribution of the 
load, and the tread will be not less than 56 
inches. The apparatus will have a carrying 



capacity when fully equipped of not less than 
2,500 pounds, and the engine must furnish 
sufficient power to drive it at a rate of 20 
miles per hour up a 12 per cent grade, or 50 
miles per hour on level roads, the maximum 
speed to be set at about 40 miles per hour. 
The motor, water-cooled, will be not less than 
80-horsepower capacity and will have either 
four or six cylinders, cast in pairs. Two separ- 
ate and distinct ignition systems will be pro- 
vided, one of the Bosch high-tension magneto, 
and the other the Atwater-Kent battery sys- 
tem or its equal. Lubrication and cooling 
devices will be arranged so as to lubricate and 
cool the machine in the most approved manner. 
The fuel capacity will be not less than 20 gal- 
lons of gasoline carried in a copper tank 
equipped with proper feed arrangements. 

The apparatus will be equipped with rotary 
fire pump or a piston pump w r ith a capacity 
of not less than 700 gallons per minute'against 
a pump pressure of 120 pounds, with all parts 
so made that they will permit of pumping 
muddy salt water without corrosion or deter- 
ioration. There will be two 4-inch suction 
connections. The shaftings will be made of 
chrome nickel steel, hardened and ground, 
with wide, strong bearings. The pump will 
be equipped with standard fire-engine pump 
gauges, air and blow-off valves, an automatic 
relief or churn valve, and either three or 
four discharge valves of the quick-opening 
lever fire-engine type, two to be on one side 
and one or two on the other. 

The hose body of the apparatus will be 
well-seasoned hardwood, reenforced at the 
edges and on inner and outer sides, with a 
capacity of 1,200 feet of 2-2-inch cotton, rub- 
ber-lined, fire hose. The sides and rear of the 
apparatus will have steps to earn,' eight men, 
and the driver's seat will accommodate two 
men. 

Work of Dredge Badger. 

The ladder dredge Badger, formerly No. 14, 
which has been excavating in the Pacific en- 
trance channel, is being overhauled at the 
Balboa shops. When it returns to commission 
it will be placed on single shift, working while 
the tide is not too high to prevent its reaching 
bottom. The Badger is an old French dredge, 
picked up in 1906 and rebuilt It went into 
active commission on September 24, 1907. 
While in the American service it has exca- 
vated approximately 4,463,000 cubic yards 
of earth and rock. 



Steamshovel No. 132 in the Borrow Pit at Mount 
Hope. 

During the month of September, Steam- 
shovel No. 132, working in the borrow pit 
near Mount Hope, excavated 42,600 i 
yards, place measurement, of which 32,41 10 
cubic yards are classified as rock, and 10,200 
cubic yards as earth. This material is used 
in making fills in connection with the new 
docks at Cristobal, and the site of the new 
hotel on Colon Beach. The shovel is served 



66 



THE CANAL RECORD 



Vol. V., No. 9. 



NOTES OF PROGRESS. 



(Continued.) 



by three trains of about ten 10-yard 
dump cars each. Delays were as follows 
Mining, 3.00; repairs, 0.45; moving shovel 
11.15; cutting out shovel (three times), 3.30 
waiting for cars, 5.30; a total of 24 hours. 
The shovel was under steam 200 hours, and 
working 88 per cent of that time. The aver- 
age output per day was 1,704 cubic yards, 
place measurement. 



Gatun Dam Spillway. 

The concrete work in the Spillway of Gatun 
Dam is about 70.5 percent completed, 159,207 
cubic yards, out of a total of 225,000, having 
been placed at the close of work on Octo- 
ber 21. A statement of the amount laid each 
working day last week, and of the total in 
place, follows: 



Date. 


Concrete 
Laid. 


Hours 
worked. 


No. 
Mixers. 




116 
36 

100 

116 
69 

128 


5.30 
2.00 
5.30 
6.00 
3.00 
6.00 




October 17 




October 18 












October 21 








Total 

Previously reported .... 


565 

159,207 


28.00 


1 




159.772 











Ancon Crusher. 

A statement of rock crushed at the Ancon 
quarry during the week ending October 21, 
follows: 



Date. 


Hours 
worked. 


Cubic 
Yards. 




7.10 
7.25 
7.45 
5.25 
7.25 
8.00 


2,690 




2,989 


October 18 


2,285 
2,549 




2,686 




2,811 






Total 


43.10 


16,010 







Porto Bello Crusher. 

A statement of the work done at the Porto 
Bello crusher, by days, for the week ending 
October 21, follows: 



Date. 


Hours 
worked. 


Cubic 
Yards. 




4.11 
3.56 
3.48 
4.37 
3.33 
3.27 


1,685 




1,780 


October 18. . 


1,572 




2,122 


October 20. . 


1,625 




1,468 






Total . . 


23.32 


10,252 







Visit of Senators. 

Among the passengers on the Ancon. which 
arrived at Cristobal on October 21, were the 
following United States Senators and their 
friends: Senators Frank B. Brandegee, New 
London, Conn.; Carroll S. Page, Hyde Park, 
Vermont; John Randolph Thornton, Alexand- 
ria, La.: Joseph L. Bristow, Salina, Kansas; 
Members Committee on Interoceanic Canals; 
Lee S. Overman, Salisbury, N. C; George 
P. Wetmore, Newport, R. I.; Albert B. Cum- 
mins, Des Moines, Iowa; Representative 
Edwin W. Higgins, Norwich, Conn.; Col. 
Daniel M. Ransdell, Sergeant at Arms, United 
States Senate; Mrs. M. G. Zalinski, N. Y.; 
Mrs. Albert B. Cummins, Des Moines; Mrs. 
Edwin \V. Higgins, Norwich, Conn.; Miss 
Charlotte B. Ransdell. Washington; Mrs. 



Arthur B. Grover, Indianapolis; Mrs. Alex- 
ander H. Gait, Washington; Mrs. Cleo C. 
Hardy, Salina, Kansas; the Hon. Michael 
Kenealy, Stamford, Conn.; Mr. Russel S. 
Page, Hyde Park, Vermont; Mr. Rogers 
Wetmore, Newport, R. I.; Mr. Alexander H. 
Gait, Secretary to Senator Page; Mr. John 
D. Brown, Secretary to Senator Overman; 



Mr. Cleo C. Hardy, Secretary to Senator 
Bristow; Mr. William Gardiner, Assistant 
Clerk to Committee; Mr. W. T. Chapman, 
Stenographer to Committee. 



The Ancon will sail for New York at noon 
on Tuesday, October 31. 



CONCRETE WORK IN THE LOCKS. 



Over 68 per cent of the concrete for the locks is in place, the amount at the close of 
work on October 21, being 2,893,785.5 cubic yards, out of atotal of approximately 4,199,400. 
A total of 33,861.5 cubic yards of concrete was laid in the locks during the week ending 
October 21. 

GATUN LOCKS. 

Over 83 per cent of the concrete for the system of three twin locks at Gatun has been 
laid, the amount in place at the close of work on October 21 being 1,660,999.5 cubic yards, 
out of a total of 2,000,000. A statement of the amount of concrete placed in the locks each 
working day for the week ending October 21, and of the total, follows; and a similar state- 
ment for the work in the spillway of Gatun Dam is published elsewhere in this issue. The 
construction plant works 12 hours daily, and the auxiliary plant 9 hours. 





Construction Plant. 
2-cubic yard mixers. 


Auxiliary Plant. 
2-cubic yard mixers. 


Large 
stone. 


Total. 




Concrete 
placed. 


Hours 

worked. 


No. of 
mixers 


Concrete 
olaced. 


Hours 
worked. 


No. of 
mixers 






Cm. Yds. 
2,174 
1,680 
1,776 
2,006 
1,776 
1,452 


31.46 i 6 
33.30 ', 6 
36.06 6 


Cm. Yds. 
354 
452 
420 
396 
196 
150 
418.5 


5.40 
6.40 
6.40 
5.40 
2.40 
2.40 


2 
2 
2 
2 
2 
2 


Cu. Yds. 
56 


Cm. Yds. 
2.658 




2,181.5 


October 18 


2,290 


October 19 

October 20 


33.10 
29.12 
24.26 


6 

4 
8 


2,502 
2,013 


October 21 


1,662 






















Total 


10,864 


185.10 


6 


2,386.5 


30.00 


2 


56 


13,306.5 
1,647,693 






















1,660,999.5 



*The 418$ vards shown for the portable mixers are reinforced concrete, and were placed on the following days: 
October 16th, 74; October 17th, 49.5; October 18th, 94; October 19th, 100; October 20th, 41; October 21st, 60. 

PEDRO MIGUEL LOCKS. 

Concrete work in the locks at Pedro Miguel is over 89 per cent completed, 747,909 cubic 
yards, out of a total of 837,400, bucket measurement, having been placed at the close of work 
on October 21. The record for each of the six 8-hour working days of last week, follows: 





Auxiliary Plant. 


Large 
stone. 




Date. 


2-cubi 

Concrete 
placed. 


: yard mixers. 


J-cubic yard mixers. 


Total. 




Hours 
worked. 


No. of 

mixers 


Concrete 
placed. 


Hours 
worked. 


No. of 
mixers 






Cm. Yds. 
746 
632 
642 
920 
608 
702 


19.50 
18.00 
16.00 
22.00 
17.00 
18.00 


3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 


Cm. Yds. 
424 
495 
331 
532 
489 
360 


25.00 
26.00 
17.00 
27.50 
25.50 
18.55 


4 
4 
4 
4 
4 
4 


Cm. Yds. 


Cm. Yds. 
1,170 




1,127 




973 




1,452 




1,097 




1,062 






Totals 


4,250 


110.50 


3 


2,631 


139.55 


4 


4.411 


6,881 

741,028 





















4,411 


747,909 








• 









MIRAFLORES LOCKS. 

Over 35.6 per cent of the concrete for the system of two twin locks at Miraflores was 
in place on October 21, the total amount on that date being 485,070 cubic yards, bucket 
measurement, out of a total of approximately 1,362,000. The record for each of the six 8-hour 
working days of last week, follows: 



Date. 



Construction Plant. 
2-cubic yard mixers. 



Concrete Hours 
placed, worked. 



Auxiliary Plant. 



2-cubic yard mixers. 



i-cubic yard mixer. 



No. of Concrete, 1 Hours No. of Concrete Hours iNo. of Large 
mixers placed. I worked, mixers: placed, worked. I mixers stone. 



Total. 



Oct. 16.. . 
Oct. 17... 
Oct. 18... 
Oct. 19... 
Oct. 20. . . 
Oct. 21... 


Cm. Yds. 
924 
516 
946 

1,040 
1,362 
1,224 


31.50 

16.67 
25.17 
25.00 
32.00 
25.00 


6 

4 
6 
6 
6 
6 


Cu. Yds. 
1,004 
1,120 

788 
1,062 

496 
1,056 


13.80 
16.50 
11.17 
14.90 
7.67 
14.50 


2 
2 
2 
2 
2 
2 


Cm. Yds. 
295 
344 
383 
398 
389 
327 


24.50 
28.00 
29.00 
27.50 
26.50 
24.00 


4 
4 
4 
4 
4 

4 


Cm. Yds. 


Cm. Yds. 
2.223 
1,980 
2,117 
2,500 
2,247 
2,607 


Total... 
Previou'ly 


6,012 


155.34 


5.67 


5,526 


78.54 


2 


2,136 


139.50 


4 


3.693 


13,674 
471,396 
























Grand 


3.693 


485,070 

























October 25, 1911. 



THE CANAL RECORD 



67 



Death from Bubonic Plague. 

Herman T. Bolton died at Ancon Hospital 
on October 17 from bubonic plague. He was 
born in Germany 35 years ago and had 
worked for the Canal Commission as a me- 
chanic, and as a building contractor. He left 
the Isthmus in July, 1911, and went to Colom- 
bia and later to Ecuador. He left Ecuador 
on October 7 on the Chile and arrived at the 
quarantine station in the Bay of Panama on 
October 11. He entered Ancon hospital on 
October 13, and died on October 17. The 
Department of Sanitation makes this state- 
ment in regard to the case: 

"The case was not recognized as plague until 
it was discovered to be so on examination at 
the autopsy, the symptoms presented not 
being those of plague. 

"The danger from a case of this kind is, that 



fleas at some point where the victim had been 

may have become infected, and thus pass the 
disease on to other human beings. To protect 
against this risk, every place at which the 
patient had been was disinfected with the 
expectation of killing all fleas. All persons 
who had been about the patient wire detained 
over the quarantine period of six days after 
they had been in contact. The patient left 
the Quarantine Station on October 13, and as 
the period of infection is seven days it is be- 
lieved that anybody exposed at that time has 
passed the period for the development of the 
disease; and as he died on the 17th, it is 
equally probable that anybody exposed in the 
hospital has passed the infectious period. 
There is no possibility, therefore, of the disease 
spreading from this case." 



LABOR FORCE AND QUARTERS IN SEPTEMBER. 



The total force at work on the Canal and railroad on September 27 was 37,315, as com- 
pared with 35,648 at the end of August, 1911; with 35,369 in September 1910, and 35,210 in 
September 1909. Canal employes numbered 29,623 and railroad employes 7,692. The 
number of "gold," or white American employes, was 4,112, compared with 4,141 in August, 
1911, and with 4,459 in September. 1910. The force report for September 27, follows: 





SILVER EMPLOYES.* 


V 

> 

'■7i 

S 
o 

H 


o 

o 

o 
H 






Artisans. 


European 
Laborers. 


West Indian 
Laborers. 


"ffl 




2 

5 
S 


= 
14 


vi 

"H 
<u 
o 

i 


a 

4» 
u 
\n 

CM 



u 

o 

CM 


a 
o 


a 

V 

o 

CM 


to 

a 

V 

u 

M3 


en 

a 

V 

u 

o 

CM 


a 

V 

u 

NO 


a 

V 

U 
CO 


i 

a 

V 

u 
o 


a 

V 
V 


a 

S 
o 


Const'ct'n andEng'r'ug. 


4.351 
162 
6S6 
907 
630 
7 

s 


227 
2 
3 

116 
2 


668 
4 
2 

144 


2.707 

25 

3 

112 


4,345 


40 


103 


498 


4.355 


3,335 
21 
392 
932 


263 

"t8 
ttl4 


20.944 

214 

1.10! 

2.606 

632 

7 

5 


3,082 
297 
368 
202 
49 
26 
8S 


24.026 
511 




3 

227 


1 
1 


16 


2 


5 
134 


1,471 

_1 ,„;, 
























33 




























93 






19 
18 
























Total 


6.748 


u 

14 


350 


818 


2.847 


4,575 


42 


119 


500 


4.494 


4.700 


285 


25,511 


4,112 


29,623 






6.657 


350 


821 


2.714 4,297 


44 


134 


502 


4,501 




266 


24,731 


4,141 


28,872 


































. 



Panama railroad force, 4, 21S; Panama railroad relocation force. 2.33S; Panama railroad commissary force 
1,136. Total, 7.692. I. C C. force. 29.623. Grand total, 37,315. 
*All wages specified are in gold, 
tlncludes 2 at 5 cents, 
ttlnclndes 7 at 5 cents. 

The employes in the Department of Construction and Engineering on September 27, 
were distributed, as follows: 





SILVER EMPLOYES.* 


u 
33 

o 


■6 
o 
O 

a 

o 






Artisans. 


European 
Laborers. 


West Indian 
Laborers. 


o 
H 

o 




>> 
5 

B 
O 

2 


V. 

a 
it 

U 

■V 

6 

6 
2 

11 
14 


■/. 
V 

CO 


v. 

a 

Of 

u 

10 

CM 


w 

a 

V 

u 

© 

CI 


v. 

Z 
u 
io 


□ 

G 
o 

o 

CM 


V. 

a 

V 

o 


■i. 

a 

V 

u 

o 

CM 


a 

V 

M3 


a 

V 
u 

CO 


1 2 
g 

o 


en 

a 

V 

u 




46 

210 

1,885 

1.069 

1.141 

4.351 


7 


11 

23 

329 
114 

191 


14 

403 

1.037 

498 

755 








11 


79 
6S0 

l.nos 
956 

1.634 


27 
20 

510 
2.574 

224 


1 
11 

43 
148 
60 


196 
1,453 
6,404 
7.887 

5,(in.t 


17.' 
663 
831 
770 
648 


366 
2,116 
7.235 
8,657 
5.652 




J 1 


79 
1,381 

1.995 
890 






Central 


11 

2 

IS 
17 


97 
29 

75 


28 ... 
1 82 

11 21 


68 

419 


Total 


227 
231 


668 
657 


2.707 
2,565 


4,345 


40 


103 


498 


4.355 


3,355 


263 


20.944 




24.026 




4.287 


4.047 


43 


115 


499 


4.432 


.'nil 


248 


20,196 


3.097 


23.293 



*A11 wages specified are in gold. 

QUARTERS. 

On October 1, there were 24,493 occupants of Commission quarters. Of these, 9,134 
were white Americans, of whom 5,122 were men, 2,052 were women, and 1,96(1 were children. 
There were 5,639 Europeans of the laborer class, of whom 5,044 were men. 246 women, and 
349 children. There were 9,720 West Indian negroes, "I whom 7,251 were men. 1,107 
women, and 1,362 children. Included in the above were M Asiatics, 126 East Indians and 
117 Panamans. 



The Peruvian bark Lena sailed from Punta 
Arenas, Costa Rica, on October 14 for Balboa 
with a cargo of between 600 and 700 tons of 
cocobolo wood for transshipment to New 
York. This will be the first time that an entire 



shipload of this wood has gone to tin States 
from Central America, previous shipments 
having been made by jobbers in smaller lots. 
The firm which bought and shipped this cargo 
is that of II. Mann et Co., of New York. 



DIET FOR THE TROPICS. 

Report of Board Approves Present Diet Offered Uy 
Commissary. 

The board of physicians convened by tin- 
Chief Sanitary Officer under directions from 
the Chairman, to report as to whether the 
ration furnished the Commission employes is 
suitable for their requirements, has submit led 
its report. The board consisted of Lieut. Col, 
I 111-. 1- . Mason, Superintendent of Ancon 
Hospital; Dr. Win. II. Bell, Superintendent 
of Colon Hospital; Dr. Samuel T. Darling, 
Chief of Board of Health Laboratory, and I >r 
B. W. Caldwell, Superintendent of Santo 
Tomas Hospital, Panama. 

Access was given to all such records as the 
board should care to consult, and it was 
authorized to call any witnesses it might 
desire. 

Special attention was given to the testimony 
of Dr. W E. Deeks, of Ancon Hospital, who 
maintained that retarded tissue metabolism 
in tropical countries invalidates dietary rules 
based on experience in the temperate zone 
and, particularly, that the food furnished the 
employes contains too great a proportion of 
sugar and starch and not enough of green veg- 
etables and fruit. To this Dr. Deeks attrib- 
uted many cases of stomach and liver disease. 
He added that fruit juices and the alkaline 
salts of vegetables facilitate digestive metab- 
olism. In a corollary to its report the board 
expresses an opinion that the commissary 
stores should keep on sale at all times such 
fruits and green vegetables as practicable, 
"not that an increased supply of these articles 
is necessary to the health of the employes, but 
that it would afford variety and contribute to 
their contentment." In the report proper, the 
Board came to its conclusions as follows: 

"After careful consideration of the letters 
of the Chairman and the order of the Chief 
Sanitary Officer convening the Board, it is our 
understanding that the following are the 
points to be determined; First — What con- 
stitutes a well balanced ration for service in 
the Tropics? Second — Is such a ration fur- 
nished by the Commissary Department? 
Third — Could any lessening of the sick rate 
among Isthmian Canal Commission and Pan- 
ama Railroad employes be effected by a dif- 
ferent ration? Fourth — What is the best diet 
for employes on the Isthmus? 

1. The Board finds that a great deal of 

work has been done in the tropics all over the 

world with a view of determining what is the 

best ration for a white man in the tropics, and 

as a result of these labors the following tables. 

taken from Munson's "Hygiene," may be 

taken as standard. 

Table I for white men weighing about one hundred 
and fifty (150) pounds, at hard labor — 

Protein 76 . 1 8 grams. 

Kats 40 00 grams. 

Carbohydrates 560.00 grams. 

Calories 2,900.00 grains. 

Proportion of carbohydrates to protein, 7} to 1. 
For soldiers under the same circumstances — 

Protein 100. grams. 

Fata 65. grams. 

Carbohydrates 650. grams. 

Calories 3,481. grams. 

Proportion of carbohydrates to protein, 6J to 1. 

2. In the sense that the ration is a definite 
quantity ol certain articles of food per man. per 
day, then- is no ration furnished by the Com- 
missary Department, the unit of measure being 
money value and not quantity. But from i he 
figures furnished by the Subsistence Officer, 
andnumerousinquirics and personal investiga- 
tions made by tin- members of the Board. we 
find that the food furnished to the hotels, mess- 
es, kitchens, and employes living elsewdiere, 



68 



THE CANAL RECORD 



Vol. V., No. 0. 



is of such quantity, quality and variety as to 
more than meet the needs of the highest of the 
above standards and to enable any employe 
to select such articles of food as the nature of 
his employment and the amount of exercise he 
takes may render best for him. Moreover, 
there is no evidence from the records of Ancon, 
Colon, and Santo Tomas hospitals, and else- 
where, that the ration furnished the Commis- 
sion employes is not a well balanced one. 

3. The food supplied by the Commissary 
having been shown to meet the requirements 
of the best tropical standards, it is our opinion 
that no lessening of the sick rate could be effect- 
ed by a different ration. As regards the ques- 
tion of diet, however, indiscretions and errors 
are certainly not more frequent here than in 
any other part of the world, though there is 
no doubt that there is some sickness which 
could be prevented could people be taught to 
exercise discretion and intelligence in the 
selection of the food they eat. 

4. As the determination of the question of 
what is the best diet depends upon so many 
factors, such as age, sex, race, habits, occupa- 
tion, etc., no directions that we could give 
would be of any value except in the most gen- 
eral way. The consensus of opinion of the best 
authorities is that, other conditions being 
equal, more sugars and starches, and less pro- 
teids, should be consumed in the tropics than 
in colder climates, but the particular diet 
which is best for any individual should be a 
matter for determination by his own phy- 
sician. 

Chas. F. Mason, Wm. H. Bell, Samuel 
T. Darling, B. W. Caldwell. 

Villages to Be Abandoned. 

Inasmuch as the portion of the Panama 
railroad between Gatun and Gorgona is to be 
torn up after the first of February, 1912, on 
account of the filling of the Gatun Lake area 
up to 85 feet above sea level, leaving the vil- 
lages along the present railroad in that section 
in isolation, the removal of inhabitants is being 
hastened. Licenses for stores and shops in this 
area are not issued as of effect after December 
31, 1911. Claims are being adujsted and in 
such cases as necessary the inhabitants will be 
assisted in their moving. 

Villages and settlements which will be 
inundated by Gatun Lake when the level has 
reached 85 feet above mean tide are: Lion 
Hill, Ahorca Lagarto, Bohio, Penas Blancas, 
Frijoles, Tabernilla, San Pablo, West San 
Pablo, Bailamonos, Mamei, Juan Grande, 
Gorgona (partly), Matachin, Bas Obispo 
(partly), Auguas Claras, Guarapo, Monte- 
vistoso, Monte Lirio, and Limon. A new vil- 
lage of Monte Lirio is being built on the re- 
located Panama railroad. Other new villages 
on it at present are New Frijoles and Gamboa. 

Half a dozen of the present villages will be 
abandoned from causes other than flooding. 
They are Miraflores and Pedro Miguel, on 
account of construction connected with locks, 
and Mandingo Llano, Rio Grande, Cucaracha, 
New Culebra and Spanishtown, the existence 
of which is not regarded as worth the cost of 
their sanitary maintenance. 

Some of the material from the hydraulic 
excavation at Miraflores is being used to make 
a fill southwest of the lower lock site on the 
east side of the Rio Grande, between Riley's 
spur of the Pacific Division and the Central 
Division tracks from Bridge 61J to the bridge 
crossing the Cardenas River. The fill will 
raise the surface of the swamp 5 or 6 feet. 



SPILLWAY GATE MACHINES 



Method of Raising and Lowering Gates to Regu- 
late Water in Lakes. 

Each of the twenty-two gates in the spill- 
ways at Gatun and Miraflores dams will be 
operated by a machine erected in a tunnel 
extending the full length of the spillway dam. 
Bids for these machines (22 in all) are about to 
be advertised for in the United States. An 
article describing the gates was published in 
The Canal Record of July 12, 1911. The 
drawings reproduced herewith show the 
method of operating the gates and the ar- 
rangement of the machinery at Gatun spill- 
way, and the principle is the same for the 
spillway at Miraflores. 

The purpose of the spillway and regulating 
gates at Gatun is to form a means of keeping 




SECTIONAL ELEVATION THROUGH COUNTERWEIGHT PIT AND CHAIN PIPE SHOWING CHAIN, 
SCREW. MACHINERY TUNNEL, WORM NUT, COUNTERWEIGHT AND COUNTERWEIGHT PIT. 



the level of the lake at approximately 85 feet 
above mean tide, by affording a method of 
allowing the flood water of the Chagres valley 
to escape without flowing over the dam. To 
this end a concrete lined channel 285 feet 
wide has been made through the center of the 
dam, and across it a concrete dam is being 
constructed to a height of 69 feet above sea 
level. Its crest is on the arc of a circle and it 
is 808 feet long, although it closes a channel 
only 280 feet wide. (At Miraflores the dam 
is straight and is 432 feet long). Between 
concrete piers rising from the top of this dam 
withtheirtopsat 115.5feet above sea level will 
be mounted the regulating gates of the sluice 
or Stoney type. Each will close an opening 
between piers 45 feet wide. There will be 
fourteen on the Gatun spillway dam and 
eight at Miraflores. Each gate will be built 
up of steel sheathing on a framed work of 
girders, will be 46 feet 3§ inches long, 19 feet 
high, will weigh 42s tons complete, have a 
range of motion vertically of 22 J feet, and will 
be constructed to stand a maximum head of 18 
feet. The gates will move on roller trains in 
niches in the piers, 15| inches deep, and will 
be equipped with sealing devices to make 
them water tight. 

The gate machines are designed to raise or 
lower a gate in approximately ten minutes. 

iv , - . A two-inch chain is attached to 

'-/ '* '£;*• • ,'J each side of the top of a gate, and 
runs thence over a sheave on top 
of the pier down into a pit in the 
spillway dam, in which there hangs 
a counterweight of cast iron. The 
i-ounterweights on a set of two 
chains practically 
balance the weight 
of the gate, so that 
the machines need 
only to overcome the 
frictional resistance. 
The counterweights 
are guided, and 
travel in pits be- 
neath the floor of 
the machinery tun- 
nel. Each weight is 
connected with the 
chain by a bronze 
screw which is driv- 
en vertically by a 
worm wheel nut — 
motor driven by a 
worm — the result- 
ing movement being 
to raise or lower the 
gate. 

The machinery 
tunnel extends the 
full length of the 
spillway, within the 
dam, and contains 
all the operating 
machinery. The 
screws for lifting the 
gates pass through 
this tunnel, extend- 
ingdownward to the 
counterweights and 
upward to the hoist- 
ing chain through 
openings provided 
for the purpose. The 
machinery'.- located 
in the tunnel, consists 



••;>:• mm 



■.'■irv'**'.. 



October 25, 1911. 



THE CANAL RECORD 



69 



of the worm nuts, worm wheel castings, 
motor driven shaft, and limit switch. The 
worm wheel casing is anchored liy foundation 
bolts to the counterweight pit cove , at the 

level of the machinery tunnel lloor, ami lakes 
the thrust of the worm nut through roller 
bearings. 



The motor is located on a bed plate about 
midway between screws and is coupled 
directly to the driving shaft. The driving 
shaft carries a worm at each end which en- 
gages the worm nut. The driving shaft is 
supported by six adjustable shaft bearings. 
The 2-inch hoisting chain is connected to the 




^»>:-: v 



PLAN SHOWING WITH RELATION TO ONE ANOTHER STONEY GATE, HOISTING CHAIN, SCREW, 

WHEEL, COUNTERWEIGHT AND PIT. 



WORM AND WORM 



upper end of the lifting screw,' passing through 
a pipe to the top of the gate pier, runs over a 
sheave and down to the gate where it is 
fastened approximately in the plane of the 
center of gravity of the gate. 

The ,'-ineh roller train chain is fastened at 
its upper end to the 2-inch chain >hea\ e bear- 
ing and is fastened, aftei passing over live 
sheaves, to a bracket which is fastened to the 
gate. One sheave is fastened to the roller- 
train, two to the bracket, and the other two 
sheaves are normally held by the bracket but 
are movable. The sheaves on the bracket 
move with the gale until the gate is above 
water, where the movable sheaves are en- 
gaged by a casting projecting from the pier, 
thus causing the roller train to rise more 
rapidly. When the gate reaches the end of 
lift the roller train is well clear of the water, 
thus protecting it from floating debris. Just 
before the roller train starts to move more 
rapidly than normal the gate is moved bodily 
upstream a short distance by two rollers near 
the ends, so that the pressure is removed from 
the roller trains, enabling them to move freely. 

The limit switch, geared to the driving 
shaft, prevents over-travel at the two ends of 
travel of the screw, by cutting off current from 
the motor in the direction of travel. The 
limit switch allows the motor to be reversed at 
the ends of travel or at any intermediate 
point. A portable hand operating device is 
provided which is clamped to the driving 
shaft when in use and operated by two cranks 
for emergency purposes. 

Seepage water will be allowed to accumu- 
late in the counterweight pits, ordinarily, and 
these pits will be freed from water by portable 
pumping outfits, of which three will be pur- 
chased. Each outfit will consist of a vertical 
centrifugal pump of 45 gallons a minute ca- 
pacity against a 32-foot head, driven by a 
vertical induction type motor, the two rigidly- 
connected and forming a unit, which will be 
waterproof so that the motor can operate 
under water up to a 30-foot head. Eye bolts 
or rings in the upper side of the casing will 
afford a means of lowering the outfit into the 
pits. 

Washington Hotel Reopened. 
The Washington Hotel in Colon, having 
been moved from the site upon which the new 
hotel is to be erected, to an adjacent site, has 
been reopened for transient and regular trade. 
The interior has been completely refinished. 
Regular meals are served from 4.30 to 8 a. m., 
1 1 a. in. to 1 p. m., 5 to 7.30 p. m. on working 
days, and on Sundays ami holidays, from 5 to 
8 a. m., 1 1.30 a. m. to 1.30 p. m., S.30 to 7.30 
p. m. A special service by the card is main- 
tained throughout the day and until 9 o'clock 
at night. Rooms may be procured at any 
time of the day or night. 



CLASSIFIED EXPENDITURES. 



A statement of classified expenditures of the Isthmian Canal Commission to August 31, follows: 



Periods. 



Department 

of Civil 

Administration 



Department 

of 

Law 



Department 

of 
Sanitation. 



Department of i 
Construction General Items, 
and Engineering 



Fortifications. 



Total. 



To June 30. 1909. 
Fiscal year, 1910.. 
Fiscal year, 1911 . 

July. 1911 

Augut. 1911 



Total . 



3,427.090.29 

709,351.37 

755.07'). 44 

72.895.22 

74.768.45 



2,527.35 
1,878.27 



9,673.539.28 

1.803.040.95 

1.717.792.62 

137.635.83 

156.954.79 



69.622,561.42 
26,300,167.05 
27.463.401.31 
2.084.530.55 I 
2.282,614.77 



78.022,606.10 

2.863,088.83 

3.112.s!4 60 

317.751.38 

359,978.95 



5.039.184.77 



4.405.62 I 13.488,963.47 I 127,753,275.10 84.675.759.86 



86.243.14 



86.243.14 



160,745.797.09 

31.675,648.20 

33,048,607.97 

2.615.340.33 

2.962.438.37 



231,047,831.96 



70 



THE CANAL RECORD 



Vol. V., No. 9. 



PERSONAL. 



Among the passengers on the Ancon, which 
arrived at Cristobal on October 21, were Mr. 
VV. G. Comber returning from annual leave 
of absence; Capt. Mark Brooke, U. S. A., 
who represented the United States in the 
transfer of French canal properties on the 
Isthmus on May 4, 1904, with Mrs. Brooke, 
and Maj. S. D. Butler, U. S. M. C, with Mrs. 
Butler and children. 

Mr. Edward Schildhauer, accompanied by 
Mrs. Schildhauer, returned from the States 
on the Colon, which arrived at Cristobal on 
October 18. 



Missionary Society. 

The Ladies Missionary Society of Empire 
Christian League held a meeting at the home 
of Mrs. E. P. Beck on Friday, October 20, 
when the members of the Missionary Society 
of the Methodist Church, Panama, were the 
guests. There were 46 present. Following 
the business session, there was a program 
consisting of songs by Mrs. E. M. Keyser 
and papers read by Mrs. H. A. Smith, Mrs. 
Fuller and Mrs. Fearon. The lesson on 
missionary work in Porto Rico was conduct- 
ed by Mrs. A. A. Nellis. On Friday evening, 
November 17, the society will hold an enter- 
tainment in the Commission chapel the pro- 
ceeds of which will be used for mission work 
in the Canal Zone. 



Red Cross Finances. 

A financial statement of the Canal Zone 
Chapter, American National Red Cross, for 
the month of September, follows: 

RECEIPTS. 

September 1, On hand $3,079.14 

September 6, Proceeds of ball at 
Gatun for the En- 
dowment Fund . . 84.63 
Total receipts $3,163.77 

DISBURSEMENTS. 

September 6.. For deportation of West 
Indian in Colon 
Hospital to St. 
Lucia $ 40.00 

September 8. .To Treasurer, Nat- 
ional Red Cross, 
Washington, total 
amount of Endow- 
ment Fund 709.63 

September 9. .Relief of wife of 
of Spaniard in the 
penitentiary 5.00 

September 21.. Loaned to American 
against his vaca- 
tion pay 168.00 

September 23. .Loaned to American 
against his vaca- 
tion pay 161.00 

September 23. .Relief of destitute 

American negress 25.00 

September 25. .Relief of negro wom- 
an. Colon fire suf- 
ferer 10.00 

September 29. .Deportation of dis- 
abled ex-employee 
to Trinidad 20.00 

Total Disbursements $1,138.63 

October 1 . . Balance on hand $2,025.14 

John L. Phillips, Treasurer. 
Approved : 

Wm. L. Sibert, Acting Chairman. 



Postal Business and Canal Zone Revenues. 

During the month of September there were 
19,408 money orders issued, amounting to 
$451,216.02. Of this amount, $340,976.03 
was issued payable in the United States, $109,- 
328.56 in the Canal Zone, $779.50 in Martin- 
ique, and $131.90 in Costa Rica. The fees 
amounted to $2,039.30, and the amount of 
orders paid and repaid was $131,009.41. 

Postal sales during the month amounted to 
$7,339.00, and newspaper postage to $2.23. 



The revenue collections for the month were 
as follows: 

Bicycle and chauffeur licenses. . . $ 41 . 00 

Insurance collections, annual fees 50 . 00 

Motor vehicle licenses 63 . 00 

Taxes, licenses, etc 15,247.67 

Miscellaneous collections 3.18 

Total $15,404.85 

Sale of Canal Buildings. 

The sale of buildings in the canal villages 
of Bohio, Tabernilla, and San Pablo, adver- 
tised below, is made because the work is 
almost completed in the lake region and 
also because the villages will be isolated after 
the present railroad is torn up during the 
approaching dry season on account of the 
impending rise of the water in the lake, due 
to the construction of the spillway dam at 
Gatun to elevation 50 feet above sea level. 
A previous sale advertised resulted in no 
satisfactory bid for the whole number of 
buildings to be sold at that time being re- 
ceived. The Quartermaster's Department 
then placed a minimum price on each build- 
ing the total being about twice that of the 
highest bid received. Already enough build- 
ings have been purchased under this arrange- 
ment to aggregate more than the original 
high bid. The buildings contain good lum- 
ber, which is expensive on the Isthmus, and 
they are used principally in building houses 
along the relocation of the Panama railroad. 

Missing Men. 

Any one having information regarding the 
whereabouts of Joseph H. Golding, who is 
supposed to be on the Isthmus of Panama, is 
requested to communicate with the American 
Legation, Panama. 

Any one having information regarding the 
whereabouts of Tim Silberman, at one time 
living in El Paso, Texas, and who is now sup- 
posed to be on the Isthmus of Panama, i- re- 
quested to communicate with The Canal 
Record. 



The steamship Stanley Dollar, from San 
Francisco, now in the bay, awaiting a berth 
at the Balboa docks, encountered such heavy 
weather while in the Gulf of California that 
a part of the deck cargo had to be jettisoned. 
Twenty thousand feet of lumber, consigned to 
dealers in Panama, was thrown overboard. 



Sale of Public Buildings. 

Office of the Chief Quartermaster, 

Culebra, C. Z., October 9, 1911. 
Sealed proposals for the purchase of any or allot sixty- 
five (65) buildings located at Bohio, Tabernilla and San 
Pablo will be received here until 3 p. m., Saturday, Oc- 
tober 28, 191 1, and then opened. List of buildings and 
full information will be furnished on application to any 
District Quartermaster or to this office. Proposals 
should be accompanied by certified check, post office 
money order or cash for 5 per cent of amount of 
bid. Successful bidders will be given the Isthmian 
Canal Commission freight rate on material contained 
in buildings purchased. Envelops containing proposals 
should be endorsed, "Proposals for the purchase of build- 
ings," and addressed to Col. C. A. Devol, Chief Quar- 
termaster, Culebra, C. Z. 



Tug Service to Porto Hello, Nombre de Dios, and 
Toro Point. 

Effective June 26, the following schedule will be 
maintained between Dock 13, Cristobal, Nombre de 
Dios, Porto Bello, and Toro Point: 

Tug Reliance will leave Dock 13 daily, except Sun- 
days, at 7 a. m.. with two barges for Nombre de Dios, 
returning at once with two bargesto Gatun. 

Tug Mariner will leave Dock 13 daily, except Sun- 
days, at 9 a. m., with three barges for Porto Bello, 
returning to Gatun as soon as barges are loaded. 

Tug Porto Bello will leave Dock 13 Saturdays at 9 
a. m., light, for Porto Bello. This tug will leave Porto 
Bello, light, at 2 p. m., arriving at Dock 4, Colon, in 
time for passengers to catch train No. 7, leaving Colon 
at 4.35 

Tug Porto Bello will leave Dock 13 Sundays at 7 
p. m., for Porto Bello, returning at once. 



Tug Mariner will leave Dock 13 daily, except Sun- 
days, at 6.30 a. m., for Toro Point, returning at once. 

Tug Mariner will leave Dock 13 Sundays at 9.30 
a. m., for Toro Point, returning at once 

A tug will leave Dock 13 on Wednesdays, Saturdays, 
and Sundays, at 4.30 p. m., for Toro Point, returning 
at 5.30 p. m. 

A tug will leave Dock 13 on the 20th of each 
month at 6 a. m., for Porto Belloand Nombre de Dios, 
returning to arrive at Dock 4, Colon, about 4.30 p. m. 



Band Concert. 

A concert will be given by the Isthmian Canal Com- 
mission Bandat Corozal, C. Z., Sunday, October 29, 
1911, at 7.30 p. m. The program follows: 

1. March — Happy Days Levi 

2. Selection — The Pink Lady Caryl 

3. Reverie — Silent Thought Morrison 

4. Overture — Jolly Robbers Suppe 

5. (a> Two Step — Billy Kendis 

(&) — Chicken Reel Daly 

6. Excerpts from Faust Gounod 

7. Paraphrase — Rocked in the Cradle of the 

Deep Lovenberg 

8. Characteristic Morceau — On Tip Toe Hosmer 

9. Medley Selection — Rossiter's Popular 

Songs Alford 

10. March — The Espanola Prance Shay 

Charles E. Jennings, Musical Director. 
The next concert will be given at Gatun, C Z., No- 
vember 5, at 5 p. m. 



Misdirected Letters, 

Ancon, C Z., October 25, 1911. 

The following insufficiently addressed letters, origi- 
nating in the United States and its possessions, have 
been received in the office of the Director of Posts, and 
may be secured upon request of the addressee: 
Baird.J. W. Jameson, Dr. Ed. 

Bernsee, W. F. Kirton, Charles 

Brown, W. R. Magerhans, A. 

Brown Miss Catherine Markham, C. W. (pkg.) 

Burke, Henry McNair. Athol C. 

Chapins, Mde. Jeanne Miller, H. A. 

Coffman. Lee Mil. ion, Mrs. Margret 

Collins, Ned Newhard, S. W. 

Collins, C. C. Pemberton, Mrs. Jas. Rex 

Compton, RoIIa Prior, Benjamin (2) 

Davis, Geo Rider, Philip 

Dew, Mrs. G. E. (pkg.) Seffers, A. M. 
Fransen. Captain Hans Sims. L. C. 
Hall, Frank Smith, Mrs. L. 

Halliman, Thos. (pamphlet) Worsleu, Robert 
Hobbs. H. C. Wright, Mrs. J. W. 



Tide Table. 

The following table shows the time of high and low 
tides at Panama for the week ending November 1, 1911 
(75th meridian time) : 



Date. 


Low. 


High. 


Low. 


High. 




A.M. 
12.00 
12.38 
1.20 
2.05 
3.00 
4. 10 
5.15 


A.M. 
6.00 
6.32 
7.10 
7.50 
8.43 
9.55 
11.15 


P.M. 
12.20 
1.00 
1.40 
2.30 
3.25 
4.30 
5.40 


P.M. 






October 28 . . 








October 30 


9.35 











Married. 

SCHOFIELD-BEVERLY— On September 28, at 
Geneva, Illinois, Laura Marguerite Beverly of Maple 
Park, 111., to Ralph Avery Schofield of Griffith. Ind., the 
Rev. G. R. Dixon officiating. Canal Zone residence, Gor- 
gona. 

TABER-WILCOX— On October 12,1911, at I. C. C. 
Chapel, Cristobal, Jean Harding Taber, of Gorgona to 
Jennie L. Wilcox, of Manistee, Michigan, the Rev. Carl 
H. Elliott officiating. Canal Zone residence, Empire. 

MORRIS-FAIRBANKS— On September 17, in 
Ancon, Myrtle Fairbanks of Tabernilla to Edwin H. 
Morris of Gorgona, the Rev. Harry Compton, 
officiating. 

WOODS-HUGHS— On September 27. at Ancon, 
Adelaid M. Hughs of Washington, D. C. to Samuel E. 
Woods, the Rev. Harry Compton officiating. 

BERNALL-BARROWS— On October 1, Myrtle Bar- 
rows to William F. Bernell, both of Pedro Miguel, the 
Rev. Harry Compton officiating. 



The following vessels arrived at, or departed from, 
the port of Balboaduring the week ending October 21: 

Arrivals — October 16, San Juan, from San Francisco; 
October 16. Mantaro, from Callao; October 16. Guat- 
emala, from Callao; October 16, Aztec, from San Fran- 
cisco; October 20, Kansas City, from San Francisco. 

Departures — October 17, Pachitea, to Callao; Oc- 
tober 17, Quito, to Guayaquil; October 18, Leggett, to 
San Francisco; October 18, Manga Reva, to San Fran- 
cisco: October 18, Chite, to Guayaquil; October 19, 
Pennsylvania, to San Francisco; October 21, Palena 
to Valparaiso. 



October 25, 1911. 



THE CANAL RECORD 



71 



OFFICIAL CIRCULARS. 



Old Laborers To Be Retained. 

Culebra C. 2., October 16, 1911. 

M KMORANDUM FOR THE ACTING CHIEF QUARTERMASTER : 

The following is quoted from a report submitted by 
the office of the Secretary to the Commission: 

"There have been several Spanish laborers in this 
office of late who were discharged by the Quartermas- 
ter's Department at Balboa. They claimed that about 
10 Spaniards were discharged on account of "reduction 
of force" in one week from September 20, to 28, and 
that 13-cent West Indian laborers were taken on in 

their place. 

*************** 

I do not consider that it is good policy at tin's time to 
substitute West Indians for Europeans. If this is being 
done in the Quartermaster's Department, please issue 
orders to stop it. 

I am also advised that work was found recently for a 
sin ill gang of new arrivals from Spain, and that speak- 
ers at the laborers' meeting at Las Cascadas yesterday 
referred to this and complained bitterly that men who 
have served for years were being laid off to make room 
for these new arrivals. There is justice in this com- 
plaint, and I do not want any more new men employed 
while we are discharging laborers with satisfactory 
records on account of reduction in force. 

Geo. W. Goethals, 
Chairman and Chief Engineer. 



Acting Superintendent, Mechanical Division. 
Culebra, C.Z., October 16, 1911. 
Circular No. 415: 

Effective October 17, 1911, Mr. J. J. Eason will act 
,i> Superintendent of the Mechanical Division during 
the absence of Mr. A. L. Robinson, on leave. 

Geo. W. Goethals, 
(hairtnan and Chief Engineer. 



Surcharge for U. S. Army. 

Culebra, C. Z, October 20, 1911. 
Circular No. 169-k: 

Effective this date, the same surcharge will apply on 
material and labor furnished detachments of the 
United States Army stationed on the Canal Zone as on 
material and labor furnished the Government of the 
Canal Zone. Geo. W. Goethals, 

Chairman and Chief Engineer. 



Gatun-Culebra Labor Train Transportation. 
Culebra, C. Z., October 20. 1911. 
Circular No. 416: 

On and after November 1,1911, no cash fares are to 
be accepted on the Gatun-Culebra labor train. 

Twenty-trip tickets, one dollar each, have been 
provided for those persons authorized to use this train. 
and will be on sale at the office of the Division Engineer 
at Gatun. beginning October 20. 1911. These tickets 
will be accepted on the train at any time thereafter. 

The pads of tickets must be presented to the con- 
ductor, who will detach tickets for the trip. 

Only those who are authorized by the Chairman and 
Chief Engineer, or the Division Engineer of the Atlan- 
tic Division, shall be permitted to use this train. 

All employes of the Atlantic Division are required to 
obtain their tickets from the office of the Division 
Engineer at Gatun. Any other persons authorized to 
use this train can secure twenty-trip tickets from the 
Conductor. 

Single trip tickets of five cents each will be sold at the 
office of the Division Engineer at Gatun only in special 
cases. Geo. W. Goethals. 

Chairman and Chief Engineer . 



cases should be reported on't he first symptoms nf illness. 
In the absence ol the Chief Quarantine Officer from 
the Isthmus at any time, information relative to infec- 
ted ships, Buepects, -mi] i :aees of illness of detained pas-, 
sengers coining from infected ports, shall be reported 
promptly to this office, first by telephone, to be fol- 
lowed by letter. 

John L. Phillips, 
Assistant Chief Sanitary Officer. 



COMMISSION CLUBHOUSES. 



Activities of the Young Men's Christian Associa- 
tion. 

The schedule of moving picture entertainments for 
the week of October 30 to November 4, is as follows: 
Monday, Gorgona; Tuesday, Gatun; Wednesday, 
Cristobal; Thursday. Culebra; Friday. Empire; Sat- 
urday, Corozal. 

The standing of the Isthmian Bowling League is as 
follows: 

Team. Won. Lost. P. C. 

Empire 35 13 .729 

Gatun 29 19 .604 

Cristobal 25 23 .521 

Gorgona 25 23 .521 

Marines 18 24 .329 

Culebra 16 32 .333 

The standing of the Isthmian Basket Ball League is 
as follows: 

Cristobal 3 1 . 000 

Culebra 2 1 .667 

Gorgona 2 1 . 667 

Gatun 2 1 .667 

Empire 3 .000 

Corozal 3 .000 

The results of basket ball games played October 21, 
follow: Cristobal, 23, Culebra. 7; Gorgona, 23. Empire, 
11; Gatun, 16, Corozal, S; games to be played October 
28 are: Cristobat at Corozal; Gorgona at Culebra; 
Gatun at Empire. 

culebra. 

The following are the results of the league bowling 
games for the week: 

Thursday evening. October 19. 
Culebra. Camp Elliott. 

Mengel... . 145 178 224 O'Sullivan.. 142 112 146 

Herrington. 170 12* Weight 180 151 141 

Driscoll.... 177 150 159 Clouse 196 154 151 

I ase 1*4 157 164 Swartz 150 182 157 

Dougherty.. 235 212 180 Austin 137 137 124 

Cushing. . . . 157 



Total. . . . 910 825 884 805 736 719 

CULEBRA AT CAMP ELLIOTT. 

Mitchell.... 146 159 185 McDonald.. 150 142 118 

Brown 112 136 103 Jauke 145 151 

Sjoblum.... 129 127 117 Estelle 138 155 105 

Baumer 131 135 171 Krouth 171 137 126 

Fay 127 154 100 Martin 167 183 157 

Calalds 138 



:\ 7f,S (.44 



Total 645 711 676 

Saturday night. October 21. 

Culebra. Gorgona. 

Herrington. 160 144 139 Arnold 144 157 157 

Warner. 147 142 loQ Sims 157 158 155 

Driscoll.... 151 171 171 Wurderman. 137 118 143 

Case 191 168 194 Orr 152 168 176 

Dougherty.. 176 189 136 Roper 180 153 151 



Quarantine Period in Plague Cases. 

Ancon. C. Z. October 21. 1911. 
To all Concerned: 

The Chief Sanitary Officer directs that in future the 
Quarantine period for passengers and members ol" the 
crew of all vessels coming to the port of Balboa or Colon 
from plague infected ports, be extended from six to 
seven full days from the hour of leaving the infected 
port. 

In case a plague suspect is taken from t! 
Quarantine on reaching the Isthmus. or dies whili 
vessel is en route to the Isthmus, tne full seven day 
period shall be reckoned from the removal of the passen- 
Old the disinfection of the ship at the Quarantine 
Station, where suspects should be isolated, the contacts 
segregated to themselves, and the other passengers 
segregated as far as possible in groups. 

Passengers being held in Quarantine, when ill from 
any cause it the time of landing, or who develop illness 
irrespective of the cause, while being held at the \ 
amine Station, must be at once isolated, given -; al 
attendance, and not discharged from Quarantine until 
authorized by the Chief Quarantine Officer, to whom all 



Total 825 814 805 772 754 782 

High scores made during the week were as follows: 

Big Pins— Dougherty 235,212; Mengal, 224; Case, 203, 

200; Warner, 208. Duckpins— Bartlett. 115, 109; 

Hobart, 107, 101; Palmer. 103; Mcllvaine, 100; Fox 

107. 
There will be a concert at the clubhouse on Sunday, 

October 29. 

EMPIRE. 

The following high scores were bowled on the alleys 
during the past week: Ten Pins — Parkis. 253; Pinney, 
203. 204, 208, 203; Rode ghiro, 217; Spinks 204; Gus- 
taveson, 222; Huson, 216. Duckpins — Dakin, 105; Pin- 
ney. 100; Grund. 102; Payne, 101. 

Empire took three games from the Camp Elliott team 
in the league series on Saturday October 2 1 . on the Em- 
pire alleys, the scores were as follows: 

Empire. Camp Elliott. 

Gustaveson. 168 171 209 Egult 126 178 152 

Spinks 170 145 174 Kritel 132 us m. 

ii iss no 177 Mi Dowel. 174 159 133 

Pearson 185 168 198 Janke 142 124 153 

Huson 167 iKi 172 Catalde... 148 132 108 



Total 878 7* 722 746 692 

On the Camp Elliott turday, October 21, 

Camp Elliott took thi I mpire. 

At ' il the literary km iety held on Friday. 

bet 20 the debate "Resolved, that women should 

be given the right ol iuffrage"wa8won by the negal Ive, 

The next meeting will be held on Friday, October 27. 

GORGONA. 

The gymnasium pictures have arrived, and a re on sale 



at the desk. Those who placed orders for these pictures 
should call for them as promptly as possible. 

At the monthly song service on Sunday evening. Oc- 
tober 22, a short program was rendered by the Arion 
Trio, followed by a talk by C. H. Elliott of Colon, after 
which the regular song service was held. 

GATUN. 

Gatun won all three games of bowling from Cristobal 
at Gatun on Saturday evening, October 21. Gatunalso 

won two games at Cristobal. 

Gatun defeated Corozal in the match game of basket 
ball on Saturday evening. October 31. The score was 
16 to 5. Mr. YV. H. Warr of Empire acted as refrecc. 

A club for the discussion of social reform questions 
is being organized at the clubhouse. 

The following bowlers have rolled 100 or over during 
the first half of October, in all 36 games: Delano. 1; 
Teall,6; Claherty. 3; Bailey. 2; Ruch, 2; Vierbuchen. 4; 
Wells. 3; Doyle. 2; Carter, 1 ; Gayer. 1 ; Wurster, 4; 
Green, 2; Barte. 5. Eight men rolled 200 or over in 
ten pins during the first half of October: Beattie. 1; 
Myers, 1; Chamberlain. 1; Galloway. 1; Hodges, 2; 
Severn, 4; DeMolI, 1; Barte, 4. DeMoll and Hodges 
lead in the ten pin ragtime tournament, score. 1,100. 
Green and Wurster lead in the ten pin ragtime, score. 
573. Galloway's game of 225 in ten pins and Barte's 
game of 124 in duckpins are the highest so far for Oc- 
tober. 

The standing of the leaders in the pool tournament 
up to October 21. was as follows: 

Name. Won. Lost. P. C. 

Bailey 3 1 000 

Jones 2 1 000 

Shiler 2 1 ooo 

Young 1 1 000 

Hughes 1 1.000 

McKay 3 1 .750 

The billiard tournament wiH begin on Thursday 
night with ten players. 

CRISTOBAL, 

There was an attendance of 53 at the Literary and 
Debating Club on Wednesday evening. October 18. 
The subject of "Disarmament" was discussed. Decis- 
ion was in favor of the negative. 

The basketball team won the game played with the 
Culebra team on the local floor Saturday evening. Oc- 
tober 21, by ascoreof 23 to 7. The Cristobal team thus 
takes first place in the Isthmian Basket Ball League. 

The Gatun bow 1 : ng team took two games out of three 
from the Cristobal team on the local alleys on Satur- 
day evening, October 21. 

The scores were as follows: 

Gatun. Cristobal. 

Dickson 158 171 169 Gibson 16S 148 155 

Myers . ..178 170 108 Blackburn.. 145 159 151 

Durand 205 172 203 Collins 166 145 173 

Beattie . . 162 171 168 Bullard . . . . 182 168 198 
DeMoll.... 175 150 160 Louch 177 160 183 



Total ... 878 835 808 838 780 860 

At the next moving picture entertainment Messrs. 

Glick and Weston will entertain the audience during 

change of film?. 

The regular session of the Debating Club, scheduled 

for November 1 . has been postponed until November 8 

at which time an adress will be delivered on "Abraham 

Lincoln." by Mr. W. F. Morrison. 



Supplies for the Canal. 

The following steamers, with supplies for the Isth- 
mian Canal Commission, arrived at the ports of Cris- 
tobal. Colon and Balboa, during the week ending Oc- 
tober 21: 

Mackinaw, October 14. from San Francisco, with 
1.090 pieces redwood lumber, for Mechanical Division, 

Allemania, October 16. from New York, with 30 
pieces steel beams, for Panama Railroad Compi 
50 coils galvanized wire, 42 kegs horse shoe?. 75 cases 
water coolers, for stock. 

Colon, October 18. from New York, with 156 barrels 
clay. 140 drums calcium carbide, for Mechanical 
Division; 59 kegs bolts, for Pacific Division; 141 kegs 
bolts. 6 cases wire cloth. 36 crates locomotive crane, for 
Atlantic Division; 21 cases castings, 35 .barrels rosin. 
1 2 eases hose, 30 barrels sea coal facing. 10 cases blast- 
ing batteries. 20 reels wire rope, 22 drums oil. 50 kegs 
wire nails. 83 bundles iron pipe. 1 22 pieces iron pipe. 25 
cases paper napkins, for stock; 30 cases drugs, and sun- 
dries, for Sanitary Department; and a miscellaneous 
cargo, the whole consisting of 1 .41 7 packages, weighing 
265 tons. 

Turrialba. October 19. from New Orleans, with 182 
piling, for Atlantic Division; 175 pieces lies, foi 
Pacific Division; 3,364 pieces lumber, 17 pieces piling, 
29 cases brass bolls, 124 bundles hand cars, lor 

Lses incandescent lamps. 36 pieces locomotive tires, 
for Mechanical Division. 

Zaeapa, October 19. from New York, with 37 i 
handles. II casi 

Atmerian, from Liverpool, with 200 bar- 

rels crude carbolic acid for stock. 



72 



THE CANAL RECORD 



Vol. V., No. 9. 



COMMISSARY DEPARTMENT. 



The commissaries are open during the following 
hours: 

Cristobal, 8 a. m. to 12.30 p. m., and 2 to 7 p. m. 
Balboa, 8 a. m. to 12.30 p. m., and 2.30 to 7 p. m. 
Ancon, 8 a. m. to 1 p. m., and 3 to 6 p. m. 
All others, 8 a. m. to 1 p. m., and 3 to 7 p. m. 



Retail prices of cold storage provisions for the week 
beginning October 21, 1911. 

fresh meats. Price. 

Mutton — Stewing, per pound 6 

Shoulder, neck trimmed off, (4 pounds 

and over) , per pound 9 

Entire forequarter (not trimmed), 10 

pounds and over, per pound 

Leg (8 to 10 pounds), per pound 

Cutlets, per pound 

Short cut chops, per pound 

Lamb — Stewing, per pound 

Entire forequarter, neck trimmed off, 

per pound 

Leg (5 to 8 pounds), per pound 

Chops, per pound 

Cutlets, per pound 

Veal — Stewing, per pound 

Shoulder, for roasting (not under 4 

pounds), per pound^ 12J 

Chops, shoulder, per pound 16 

Chops, per pound 24 

Loin, for roasting, per pound 24 

Cutlets, per pound 



Pork — Loin chops or roast, per pound t20 

Beef — Suet, per pound 2 

Soup, per pound 5 

Stew, per pound 8 

Corned, No. 1, per pound 

Corned, No. 2, per pound 10 

Chuck roast (3 pounds and over), per 

pound 12 

Pot roast, per pound 12$ 

Rib roast, second cut (not under 3i 

pounds) , per pound 16 

Rib roast, first cut (not under 3 pounds), 

per pound 18 

Sirloin roast, per pound 19 

Rump roast, per pound 19 

Porterhouse roast, per pound 20 

Steak, chuck, per pound 12£ 

Round, per pound 13 

Rib, per pound 18 

Sirloin, per pound 19 

Rump, per pound . 19 

Porterhouse (not less than 1 \ 

pounds), per pound 20 

Tenderloin (Western), per pound. 24 

MISCELLANEOUS. 



Caviare, Russian, per tin 

Livers — Beef, per pound 

Calf, each 

Half, each 

Steak, Hamburger, pkg 

Sausage — Bologna, per pound 

Frankfurter, per pound 

Lieberwurst, per pound 

Devonshire Farm, per pound 

Sweetbread — Veal, per pound 

Beef , per pound 

Eggs, fresh, dozen 

one-half dozen only 

Bluensh, fresh, per pound 

Halibut, fresh, per pound 

Shads, fresh, each 

Shad roes, fresh, per pair 

Oysters, 1 qt. kegs, per keg 

POULTRY AND GAME. 

Chickens — Fancy roasting, milk fed, large, each 

Fancy roasting, milk fed, med., each 

Fancy roasting, corn fed, about 4J 

pounds, each 

Fowls, each 60, 70.80,90. 

Ducks, Western, about 4$ pounds, each 

Broilers, milk fed, each 

corn fed, each 

Turkeys, per pound 

Squabs, each 

Capons, each 

Fryers, corn fed, each 

Partridges, each 

Grouse, each 

CURED AND PICKLED MEATS. 

Ham — German, Westphalia, per pound 

Sugar cured, per pound 

Sliced, per pound 

Half, for boiling, per pound 

Boiled, per pound 

Hocks, per pound 

Todd's Smithfield Virginia, per pound.. 

Bacon — Breakfast, whole piece, per pound 

Breakfast, sliced, per pound 

Pork, salt family, per pound 

Ox tongues, each 

Pigs' feet, per pound 

Tongues, per pound 

Sliced bacon in 1-pound tins, per tin 

In 1-pound jars, per jar 

DAIRY PRODUCTS. 

Butter — Creamery special, per pound 

Cheese — Roquefort, per pound 

Philadelphia cream, cake 

Philadelphia cream, cake 

Young America, per pound 

Swiss, per pound 



47, 89 

7 

60 

30 

13 

10 

12 

10 

17 

1.20 

25 

t32 

tl7 

14 

15 

70 

35 

50 



tl.35 
1.00 

90 

1.00 

1.00 

t70 

t60 

26 

35 

2.10 

60 

50 

50 



36 
20 
22 
21 
28 
18 
30 
23 
24 
13 
1.00 
9 
18 
30 
30 

t35 
38 
10 
18 
20 
26 



Price. 

P-dam. each 1.00 

Neufchatel, cake 6 

Gouda. per pound 34 

■Milk (Certified) . per bottle **25 

Buttermilk, bottle **15 

Fer-mil-lac, bottle **25 

Ice cream, quart 125 

i-gallon 150 

VEGETABLES AND FRUITS. 

Beets, per pound 3 

Celery, per head 6 

Cabbage, per pound 4 

Cucumbers, per pound "* 

Carrots, per pound 3 

Cauliflower, per pound 7 

Lettuce, per pound 12 

Onions, per pound 3$ 

Peppers, green, per pound 10 

Potatoes, sweet American, per pound 3 

Potatoes, white, per pound 3 

sweet, per pound 2 

Pears, alligator, each 6 

Parsnips, per pound 4 

Romaine, per pound ; 15 

Squash, per pound * 3 

Turnips, per pound 3 

Tomatoes, per pound 6 

Yams, per pound 3 

Apples, per pound 3 

Cantaloupes, each 

Grapes, per pound T10 

Grape Fruit, each 4 

Lemons, dozen 24 

Limes, per 100 80 

Oranges, California, per dozen 36 

Oranges, per dozen 12 

Peaches, pound TJ0 

Plums, per pound 10 

Pears, per pound 6 

♦Indicates reduction from last list. 

♦♦Indicates 5 cents allowed for return of bottle. 

tlndicates advance on last list. 

tSold only from commissaries; no orders taken for 

delivery t 

Rainfall from October 1 to 21, 1911, Inclusive. 



Stations. 



MOVEMENT OF OCEAN VESSELS. 



Pacific Section 

Ancon 

Balboa 

♦Miraflores 

Pedro Miguel 

Rio Grande 

Central Section — 

Culebra 

♦Camacho 

Empire 

Gamboa 

*Juna Mina 

Alhajuela 

*E1 Vigia 

♦Gorgona 

San Pablo 

Tabernilla 

Bohio 

Atlantic Section — 

Gatun 

♦Brazos Brook. . 

Colon 

Porto Bello 

♦Nombre de Dios 



c 








E >• 




2-3 




|« 








cd O 




S 


Q 


Ins. 




4.47 


9 


2.58 


9 


2.00 


18 


1.73 


10 


2.34 


5 


2.64 


1 


2.91 


1 


2.15 


1 


1.76 


21 


2.03 


21 


1.75 


3 


1.50 


3 


1.13 


21 


1.34 


12 


1.48 


21 


1.41 


3 


1.45 


12 


1.67 


13 


2.09 


12 


2.67 


2 


1.30 


12 



Ins. 
7.87 
5.59 
5.32 
7.52 

11.52 

11.46 
13.10 
10.65 
8.61 
7.92 
8.31 
9.41 
6.93 
4.55 
5.87 
7.51 

8.68 
6.03 
8.02 

ts.so 

4.77 



♦Standard rain gage — readings at 5 p. m. daily. 
Automatic rain gage at unstarred stations — value 
midnight to midnight. tTo 5 p. m.. October 20. 

Stages of the Chagres. 

Maximum heights of the Chagres River for the week 
ending midnight, Saturday, October 21, 1911. All 
heights are in feet above mean sea level. 





Station. 


Day and Date. 


Vigia. 


p 
3 


ffl 
o 

a 

O 


d 

o 
pq 


a . 

CO rt 


Sun., Oct. 15... 
Mon., Oct. 16.. 
Tues., Oct. 17.. 
Wed., Oct. 18.. 
Thurs..Oct. 19. 
Fri., Oct. 20 . . . 
Sat., Oct. 21.. . 


127.8 
126.4 
127.7 
128.6 
127.5 
127.8 
127.5 


93.8 
93.0 
93.8 
94.5 
94.1 
94.0 
94.0 


46.5 
45.6 
47.0 
47.6 
47.6 
47.4 
48.4 


15.2 
15.0 
14.8 
14.9 
15.0 
14.9 
15.6 


15.1 
14.8 
14.6 
14.6 
14.7 
14.8 
15.1 


Height of low 


125.0 


92.0 


44.0 







Lost — In Ancon, gold locket from, watch fob with 
monogram on the back "T. L. R." A reward is offered 
for its return to Dr. Thos. L. Ramsey, Ancon Hospital. 



Lost— Canal Medal No. 1,350, Bar 826. Reward if 
returned to H. A. Hart. Division Engineer's Office. Em- 
pire. 



The following is a list of the sailings of the Panama 
Railroad Steamship Company; of the Royal Mail 
Steam Packet Company; of the Hamburg-American 
Line, and of the United Fruit Company's Line; the 
Panama Railroad Company's dates being subject to 
change. 

NEW YORK TO CRISTOBAI.. 

Panama P. R. R .Tuesday. . . Oct. 24 

Allianca P. R. R .Tuesday.. .Oct. 31 

Colon P. R. R.Monday... Nov. 6 

Advance P. R. R.Saturday. .Nov. 11 

Panama P. R. R . Saturday .. Nov. 18 

Allianca P. R. R.Friday .. ..Nov. 24 

CRISTOBAL TO NEW YORK. 

Ancon P. R. R.Tuesday.. .Oct. 31 

Advance P. R. R .Monday. .. Oct. 30 

Panama P. R. R . Sunday. . . . Nov. 5 

Allianca P. R. R .Saturday . .Nov. 11 

Colon P. R. R.Saturday. .Nov. 18 

Advance P. R. R.Friday Nov. 24 

NEW YORK TO COLON. 

Prinz August Wilhelm.. . .H.-A Saturday. .Oct. 21 

Santa Marta U. F. C. Thursday.. Oct, 26 

Prinz Sigismund H.-A... .Friday. . . .Oct. 27 

Thames R. M Saturday . . Oct. 28 

Metapan U. F. C..Thursday...Nov. 2 

Prinz Joachim H.-A . .Saturday. . .Nov. 4 

Zacapa U. F. C.Thursday.. .Nov. 9 

Prinz Eitel Friedrich H.-A . .Friday Nov. 10 

Trent R. M.. .Saturday . . .Nov. 11 

Almirante U. F. C.Thursday.. . Nov. 16 

Prinz August Wilhelm .... H.-A. . . Saturday . . . Nov. 18 

Santa Marta U. F. C.Thursday.. .Nov. 23 

Prinz Sigismund H.-A. . . . Friday .... Nov. 24 

Oruba R. M . .Saturday. . .Nov. 25 

Metapan U. F. C.Thursday.. .Nov. 30 

Prinz Joachim H.-A . . Saturday . . . Dec. 2 

Zacapa U. F. C.Thursday . ..Dec. 7 

Prinz Eitel Friedrich H.-A . . Friday Dec 8 

Magdalena R. M . . Saturday ... Dec. 9 

Almirante U. F. C.Thursday.. ..Dec. 14 

Prinz August Wilhelm. . . .H.-A. . .Saturday. . .Dec. 16 

SantaMarta U. F. C. Thursday.. .Dec. 21 

Prinz Sigismund H.-A. . .Friday Dec. 2 

COLON TO NEW YORK. 

Zacapa U. F. C. Thursday.. Oct. 26 

Prinz Eitel Friedrich H.-A Saturday . .Oct. 28 

Trent R. M . . .Tuesday.. .Oct. 31 

Almirante U. F. C .Thursday. . Nov. 2 

Prinz August Wilhelm. . . . H.-A Tuesday. . . Nov. 7 

Prinz Sigismund H.-A. . . . Saturday . . Nov. 1 1 

Oruba R. M. . .Tuesday.. .Nov. 14 

Metapan U. F. C.Thursday.. .Nov. 16 

Prinz Joachim H.-A . .Tuesday.. . .Nov. 21 

Zacapa U.F. C.Thursday . ..Nov. 23 

Prinz Eitel Friedrich H.-A . .Saturday. . .Nov. 25 

Magdalena R. M . . Tuesday. . . . Nov. 28 

Almirante U. F. C.Thursday. . . Nov. 30 

Prinz August Wilhelm. .. .H.-A . .Tuesday. .. .Dec. 5 

Santa Marta U. F. C.Thursday. . . Dec. 7 

Prinz Sigismund H.-A. . . Saturday . . . Dec. 9 

Clyde R. M. Tuesday Dec. 12 

Metapan U. F. C.Thursday.. .Dec. 14 

Prinz Joachim H.-A . .Tuesday.. . .Dec. 19 

Zacapa U. F. C.Thursday.. .Dec. 21 

NEW ORLEANS TO COLON. 

Abangarez U.F. C. Saturday ...Oct. 21 

Cartago U. F. C.Wednesday.Oct. 25 

Atenas U. F. C.Saturday . ..Oct. 28 

Turrialba U. F. C. .Saturday. . Nov. 4 

Heredia U. F. C. . Wednesday.Nov. 4 

Abangarez U. F. C. .Saturday. . Nov. 11 

Cartago. . . '. U. F. C. Wednesday.Nov. 15 

COLON TO NEW ORLEANS. 

Carrillo U. F. C. Thursday.. Oct. 26 

Turrialba U. F. C. Thursday. . Oct. 26 

Cartago U. F. C. . Thursday. . Nov. 2 

Abangarez U. F. C. . Thursday . .Nov. 2 

Tivives U. F. C. .Thursday. . Nov. 9 

Atenas U.F. C. .Thursday.. Nov. 9 

Hamburg-American steamers leave Colon for New 
York via Kingston at 10 a. m. on sailing dates. The 
Prinz August Wilhelm and Prinz Joachim call at 
Santiago de Cuba, on both outward and homeward 
voyages. 

Royal Mail steamers leave for New York on alter- 
nate Tuesdays, at 10 a. m.; for Southampton on alter- 
nate Tuesdays at 10 a. m. 

United Fruit Company's ships for New Orleans 
direct, leave on Thursdays at 3 p. m.; ships for New 
Orleans in the coastwise service on Thursdays at 4 p. m. ; 
ships for New York via Kingston on Thursdays at 11 
a. m.: for Bocas del Toro on Mondays at 6 p. m. 

The Leyland steamship Asian will sail for Texas 
City direct on the 30th inst. 



CANAL 




RECORD 



Volume V. ANCON, CANAL ZONE, WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 1, 1911. No. 10. 



The Canal Record 

Published weekly under the authority and supervision of 
the Isthmian Canal Commission. 



The Canal Record is issued free of charge, one copy 
each, to all employes of the Commission and Panama 
Railroad Company whose names are on the gold roll. 
Extra copies and back numbers can be obtained from the 
news stands of the Panama Railroad Company for five 
cents each. 

Adress all Communications 

THE CANAL RKCORD, 

Ancon, Canal Zone, 

Isthmus of Panama. 
No communication, either for publication or requesting 
information, will receive attention unless signed with the 
full name and address of the writer. 

NOTES OF PROGRESS. 

Bound Volumes of The Canal Record. 

A limited number of bound copies of Vol- 
ume 4 of The Canal Record will soon be 
ready for distribution for official purposes. 
These copies will be marked FOR OFFICIAL 
USE ONLY— Properly of I. C. C. Heads of 
Departments are requested to advise the 
Secretary of the Commission at Ancon of the 
number of these volumes that they will require 
for use in their departments, citing the names 
of the persons to whom they should be issued. 



Inner Harbor at Pacific Entrance. 

Excavation of the basin of the permanent 
harbor at the Pacific entrance was begun on 
October 20 by the ladder dredge Badger which 
i-. removing the spii lying between the Canal 
channel and the lower waters of ihe Rio 
Grande, which empties into the Pacific oppo- 
site the sand wharf at Balboa, east of the 
Canal. The portion of the spit to be taken out 
lies between Station 2,2+2 and Station 2,200, 
the latter being about 4,200 feet from the 
southern end of the spit. The average width 
of the section to be excavated is about 1,000 
feet, so that its area is approximately 90 acres. 
Its surface is now S feel above mean sea level, 
and it is submerged at extreme high tide. 
It is to be excavated to a depth of 40 feet 
below mean tide. Borings show that to this 
depth the material to be excavated is practi- 
cally all mud and clay. 

Within a short time another dredge will join 
theBadger in this work. This is only a portion 
of the excavation for the inner harbor as the 
present plans call for a basin of about 246 
acres. Plans for the dorks have not yet been 
decided upon. 

Nao* Island Trestle. 

The building of a double track trestle 30 
feet wide, from the end of the present one 
on the Xaos Island breakwater to the island, 
a distance of 2,7i»i s el . will begin next week, 
for the purpose of increasing the amount ol 
spoil that may be dumped daily and thus 
hastening the completion of the breakwater. 

In building the trestle rows of piling, 



transverse to the axis, will be driven at intcr- 
valse of 13j feet. Each row or bent will con- 
tain 9 piles, the 7 inside piles to be driven 
straight, while the outside piles will hast a 
batter of 2 inches to a foot The cap of each 
bent will be 12 by 14- inch by 30 foot, and each 
trackway will rest on four stringers, 8 by 16 
inches and 28 feet long, laid on the caps at a 
height of 11 feet above mean sea level. There 
will be a space between the ties of the two tracks 
of about ten feet and in this will be built track 
for the pile driver, thus allowing it to drive 
on either side of the trestle without moving 
from the center track. The piles will be 70 
feet in length, with auxiliary piles 40 feet long, 
which may be spliced on if the penetration re- 
quires a longer pile. At such joints there will 
be four wood splice-plates, each 3 by 8 inches 
and 6 feet long, and bolted on with six 1-inch 
machine bolts through the piles. 

Between the present end of the trestle and 
Naos Island, scows have been dumping rock, 
both to form a base for the breakwater and to 
steady the piles which will be driven through 
this spoil to the rock below. The average 
depth to rock is about 60 feet below mean sea 
level, and the scows are laying a base about 
200 feet wide. Since the sinking of the trestle 
does not begin until the top of the fill is above 
mean tide, the fill will be made to that eleva- 
tion clear out to the island. Then the re- 
mainder of the fill will be made by trains 
dumping from the island end. In this way 
any sinking of trestle due to the jar of unload- 
ing will occur at the outer end, and the dump- 
ing of spoil between the point of subsidence 
and the mainland need not be interfered with. 



Gatun Dam. 

A natural depression near the downstream 
edge of the east wing of Gatun Dam, about 
300 yards from the spillway, is being filled 
with spoil from the pipeline suction dredge 
No. 86, which is working in a borrow pit 
near the French channel. The fill will rein- 
force the dam and do away with a malarial 
swamp. It will require about a quarter of a 
million cubic yards of material. After the 
hydraulic filling has raised the surface of the 
area to that of the adjacent ground, earth and 
rock will be dumped on it from trains. 

From the upper edge of the cast wing of the 
concrete intake at Gatun spillway, a trestle 
has been built, parallel to the axis of the 
stream and in line with the instream side of 
the concrete Work, to the point where a former 
trestle crosses the spillway gap, along the 
upper edge of the dam. Dumping from the 
new trestli I I L Mi I it is pur- 

posed to fill in the space between the tn 
and the east dam, raising the surface from an 
average of 15 feet above sealevel to plus 45 
feet. Approximately, 75.000 cubic yar 
spoil will be required for this fill. 



channel of a small river, as is shown by the 
strata of gravelly material with which the bed 
had become filled. To block possible slides of 
the loose earth, the dirt is being removed to 
bedrock several feet back of the line of the lock 
wall and holes drilled into the rock for 
the insertion of steel rails, around which, as 
reinforcement, a copcrete retaining wall is 
to be constructed. Excavation at this point 
is down to the ultimate required level, 55 feet 
below mean tide. 

The Pacific Division has finished the elec- 
trical wiring and connecting for berm crane 
"E," dismantled at Pedro Miguel Locks and 
rebuilt at Miraflores by the McClintic-Mar- 
shall Company, and the crane has begun 
placing concrete in the east side wall of the 
upper lock chamber. This is the fouith and 
last of the berm cranes to be moved. There 
remain at Pedro Miguel Locks two cantilever 
chamber cranes, which can still be used to 
advantage in placing the remainder of the 
concrete there, in making backfill and in 
carrying machinery. 



Fortification Work. 

Work has been begun on a cement shed and 
office building, 28 by 60 feet, at Toro Point 
for use in connection with the fortification 
work at the Atlantic entrance. The building 
is being constructed of lumber from the old 
Commission hotel at Culebra. A type 17 
house will be erected at Toro Point for the 
man who will superintend the fortification 
work under the direction of the Chief Engineer. 

The Construction Quartermaster will com- 
plete the work of fitting up quarters for the 
fortification force at the Pacific entrance this 
week. An article in The Canal Record of 
September 27 gave details of the preliminary 
operations of which the furnishing of quarters 
forms a part. The quarters are remodeled 
buildings on Naos Island recently acquired 
from the Pacific Mail Company as part of its 
interest in the islands at the southern en- 
trance to the Canal 



Miraflores Locks. 
Excavation for the lower chamber of Mira- 
flores Locks cut acrosg what was once the 



An Improved Rail Clamp. 

A new rail clamp, invented by W. 11. Bat 
Superintendent of Steam Shovel Repairs, 
after a six months' trial, has been adopted 
and 350 will be put into service. 

The function of this clamp is to act as a 
"stop" when a shovel is moving forward, to 
prevent its running off the end of the track; 
also to "block" the truck wheels securely in 
place when the shovel is working. 

The clamp used heretofore was attached to 
the rail by means of a key driven under the 
base of the rail, consequent ly it was necessary 
to place the clamp between ties. When the 
track is in mud and water up to the rails the 
annoyance and delay incident to attaching the 
clamp are considerable; furthermore, the tics 
often interfere with locating the clamp where 
desired. 

The new clamp is fastened to the rail by 



74 



THE CANAL RECORD 



Vol. V., No. 10. 



NOTES OF PROGRESS. 

(Continued.) 

means of a tapered key of steel passing cross- 
wise over the rail and thus permits the clamp 
to be set directly over a tie, or any place 
desired. The key being above the rail avoids 
the mud and water. 

The principle on which the clamp works is 
similar to that of a pair of ice tongs. The 




RAIL CLAMP INVENTED AT 
EMPIRE SHOPS. 



clamp consists of two steel castings which 
form the hooks and body of the ice tongs as 
well as a convenient handle. These castings 
are fastened together by means of a heavy 
rivet which acts as a hinge pin. The hooks 
bear on the under side of the rail head when 
the wedge is driven above the rail, and below 
the hinge pin; thus giving a secure grip on 
the rail. The cost of the new clamp is con- 
siderably less than that of the old style. 



Gatun Dam Spillway. 

The concrete work in the Spillway of Gatun 
Dam is about 71 per cent completed, 160,532 
cubic yards, out of a total of 225,000, having 
been placed at the close of work on Octo- 
ber 28. A statement of the amount laid each 
working day last week, and of the total in 
place, follows: 



Date. 


Concrete 
Laid. 


Hours 
worked. 


No. 

Mixers. 




132 
108 
128 
108 
144 
140 


7.00 
5.30 
7.30 
6.30 
7.00 
7.00 


1 




1 




1 




1 




1 




1 






Total 


760 
159.772 


40.30 


1 


Previously reported . . . 




Grand total 


160.532 





Porto Bello Crusher. 

A statement of the work done at the Porto 
Bello crusher, by days, for the week ending 
October 28, follows: 



Date. 


Hours 
worked. 


Cubic 
Yards. 




3.35 
4.12 
4.50 
5.00 
2.20 
3.55 


1.581 




1.673 




2.040 




2,241 




1.150 




1,638 






Total 


23.52 


10,323 



Teachers and Clerks, Philippine Service 

Examinations have been announced by the 
Civil Service Commission, which it is expected 
to hold at Culebra on December 27 and 28, 
for assistant (male), teacher (male and fe- 
male), and industrial teacher (male), in the 
Philippine Service. Applications must be 
forwarded to this office before December 5. 

The entrance salaries for male and female- 



appointees from the above examinations will 
probably be from SI, 000 to SI. 200 per annum- 
A limited supply of the announcement of 
the above exam inations has been received. 
Persons interested should request a copy of 
announcement No. 777, but an application 
blank should not be requested unless, after 



reading the announcement, intention is had 
to apply for one of the examinations. The 
announcement should be immediately re- 
turned to this office in order not to delay the 
dissemination of the information contained 
therein. John K. Baxter, 

Secretary, Isthmian Civil Service Board. 



CONCRETE WORK IN THE LOCKS. 



Over 69 per cent of the concrete for the locks is in place, the amount at the close of 
work on October 28, being 2,926,698 cubic yards, out of a total of approximately 4,199,400. 
A total of 32,720 cubic yards of concrete was laid in the locks during the week ending 
October 28. 

GATUN LOCKS. 

Over 84 per cent of the concrete for the system of three twin locks at Gatun has been 
laid, the amount in place at the close of work on October 28 being 1,674,103 cubic yards, 
out of a total of 2,000,000. A statement of the amount of concrete placed in the locks each 
working day for the week ending October 28, and of the total, follows; and a similar state- 
ment for the work in the spillway of Gatun Dam is published elsewhere in this issue. The 
construction plant works 12 hours daily, and the auxiliary plant 9 hours. 





Construction Plant. 
2-cubic yard mixers. 


Auxiliary Plant. 
2-cubic yard mixers. 


Large 
stone. 


Total. 




Concrete 
placed . 


Hours 
worked. 


No. of 
mixers 


Concrete 
olaced. 


Hours ' No. of 
worked, mixers 






Cu. Yds. 
1,470 
1.462 
1.536 
1,812 
1.288 
1,848 


25.20 
25.42 
23. 18 
28.32 
21.08 
28.53 


4 
4 
6 
6 
6 
6 


Cu. Yds. 
474 
618 
292 
512 
512 
586 
410 


6.40 
8.40 
5.40 
7.20 
7.40 
7.30 


2 
2 
2 
2 
2 
2 


Cu. Yds. 

54 
80 
66 
84 


Cu. Yds. 
2.010 




2.152J 


October 25 


1.975 
2,473 




1.S27J 




2,566 
























9.416 


152.53 


5.33 


3,404 


46.30 


2 


. 284 


13.104 
l,660, c 99 























1,674,103 















'The 410 yards shownforthe portable mixers are reinforced concrete and were placed on the following days : 
October 23rd, 66; October 24th. 725; October 25th, 93; October 26th, 69; October 27th. 61 J; October 28th, 48. 

PEDRO MIGUEL LOCKS. 

Concrete work in the locks at Pedro Miguel is over 90 percent completed, 754,084 cubic 
yards, out of a total of 837,400, bucket measurement, having been placed at the close of work 
on October 28. The record for each of the six 8-hour working days of last week, follows: 





Auxiliary Plant. 


Large 
stone. 






2-cubic yard mixers. 


i-cubic yard mixers. 


Total. 




Concrete 
placed . 


Hours 
worked . 


No. of 
mixers 


Concrete 
placed. 


Hours 
worked. 


No. of 
mixers 






Cu. Yds. 
711 
626 
624 
944 
720 
698 


17.00 
25.00 
18.00 
24.00 
18.00 
18.00 


3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 


Cu. Yds. 

315 1 16.00 


3 
3 
3 
4 
3 
3 


Cu. Yds. 
12 


Cu. Yds. 
1,038 




195 
317 

268 
302 
443 


10. 17 
17.50 
16.25 
15.50 
24.75 


821 




941 




1,121 




1,022 




1,141 














4,323 ! 120.00 


3 


1,840 


100.17 


3.17 


12 
4.411 


6.175 




747,909 


















4.423 


754,084 




1 













MIRAFLORES LOCKS. 

Over 36 per cent of the concrete for the system of two twin locks at Miraflores was 
in place on October 28. the total amount on that date being 498,511 cubic yards, bucket 
measurement, out of a total of approximately 1,362.000. The record for each of the six 8-hour 
working days of last week, follows: 





Construction Plant. 
2-cubic yard mixers. 


Auxiliary Plant. 




Date. 


2-cubic yard mixers. 


j-cubic yard mixer. 


Total. 




Concrete Hours !No. of 
placed. I worked. | mixers 


Concrete Hours J No. of 
placed, j worked, i mixers 


Concrete 
placed. 


Hours No. of 
worked, mixers 


Large 
stone. 




Oct. 23.... 
Oct. 24.... 
Oct. 25.. 
Oct. 2<S.... 
Oct. 27.... 
Oct. 28.... 


Cu. Yds. 

1.152 

930 

840 

49S 

1,226 

1,076 


30.20 
29.00 
25.00 
13.17 
27.00 
32.30 


6 
6 
6 
4 
6 
7 


Cu. Yds. 
904 
784 
964 
1,030 
858 
900 


12.90 
11.50 
14.20 
15.40 
13.50 
14.97 


2 
2 

2 

2 
2 


Cu. Yds. 
384 
391 
357 
278 
418 
451 


30.00 
27.00 
24.75 
12.50 
35.00 
37.00 


5 
4 
4 
4 
5 
5 


Cu. Yds. 


Cu. Yds. 
2,440 
2,105 
2,161 
1,806 
2,502 
2,427 


Totals. . 
Previously 


5,722 


156.67 


5.83 


5,440 


S2.47 


2 


2,279 


166.25 


4.5 


3,693 


13,441 
485,070 


Grand 




















3,693 


498,511 

























November 1, 1911. 



THE CANAL RECORD 



75 



COMMISSARY BUSINESS. 

Details of Transactions in 1911 Compared with 
Those of 1910. 

The business of the Commissary Depart- 
ment of the Panama Railroad Company dur- 
ing the fiscal year ending June 30, 1911, 
aggregated $5,754,955.69, an increase of $423,- 
438.88 over the preceding year. Merchan- 
dise was imported to the value of $4,267,792.- 
05, as compared with S3, 913, 519. 14 for last 
year. A classified statement of importations, 
the figures being for cost, insurance and 
freight paid delivered on the Isthmus, follows: 



Class. 


1910. 


1911. 


Groceries 

Hardware 


Sl.064.075. 27 

9S.902.50 

694.476 67 

165.303.38 

1,348,376.57 

11.91S 59 

153.9 

325,453.42 

51,025.90 


1,278,594, 79 
86." 
603 490 18 


Boots and shoes 

Cold storage supplies. 


164,168 89 

1.573.202.97 
9.0^0 48 


Tobacco 

Paper, twine, station- 
ery, etc 


182.590 96 

215,375.22 

54.579.70 


Total 


$3,913,519.14 


4.267.792.05 



The relative percentage of goods under each 
classification sold through the retail stores 
during the year is as follows: Groceries and 
staples, 29.20; cold storage, 36.30; dry goods, 
men's furnishings and notions, 15.41; boots 
and shoes, 4.36; tobacco, cigars and con- 
fectionery, 3.97; hardware. 1.62; furniture, 
.19; stationery, 1.19; raw material, 7.76. 

There were increases in the importations of 
fresh and pickled meats, and the prices on 
these were reduced. On some of the staple 
articles of groceries there were reductions in 
prices, but as a rule the prices of groceries 
maintained about the same level as obtained 
during the previous year. Prices on boots 
and shoes and standard dry goods were re- 
duced. The following table gives the im- 
portations of meat and dairy products, in 
comparison with the statistics for the fiscal 
year 1910: 



Fresh meats, lbs 

Cured and pickled 


5,229.306 

1.046.029 
114.192 
502.950 
471.551 
429.575 
41.901 
22.900 


5,454.989 

3.786.869 
110.415 
692 060 






429 267 


Poultry lbs 

Fresh milk, gals 

Fresh cream, gals. . . . 


554.028 
57,016 
29.950 



Importations of fresh vegetables for the 
two years were as follows, in pounds: 



1910. 



Potatoes, white 4.5S6.967 

Potatoes, sweet 638.584 

Onions 717.557 

Turnips 122.632 

Beets 26.059 

Carrots 91.830 

Cabbage 656.905 

Yams 424.789 

Other vegetables in- 
cluding celery, to- 
matoes, squash, et. 622.484 



1911. 



5.250.609 

1.151.921 
107.902 
53.279 
101.788 
640. (,S1 
193,127 



499.952 



Fresh fruits were purchased abroad, for the 
two years, as follows: 



Apples, lbs 


5:6.4: J 


Peaches, lbs 


63.944 




21,780 
















13.574 






Limes, doz . . . 


5.493 


Cantaloups, each .... 


59.724 


Watermelons, each. . . 


10.845 


Other fruits, lbs 


26.: ;o 



668,485 

42.95S 
45.637 

62.608 

34.550 
10.446 

56.155 

29.480 



Sales and issues to all departments for the 
two years were as follows: 





1910. 


1911. 


Isthmian Canal Com- 
mission 

United States Gov- 


$1,664,873.66 

135.068.36 

100.90l.is 
3.083,064.13 

229.328.02 

9,501.84 

108,779.02 


$1,625,348.77 
102 138.31 


To others for cash. . . 
To others lor coupons 
Issued to depart- 
ments of the rail- 
road ' and used in 
operation of Corn- 


103.706.31 

3.609, 35S.01 

208,223.82 

8.904.09 

98.276.38 


Issued to Panama 
Railroad Steamship 


Condemned and 
damaged goods. 


Average s lies and 
issues per mo. . . . 

Stock on h a n d . 
June 30 


$5,331,516.81 

444.293.07 
1.391,342.33 


$5,754,955.69 
479,579.64 
997,175.60 



A comparison of prices for June, 1911, as 
against June, 1910, of foodstuffs, shows that 
of the 262 items into which the goods are 
classified by the Commissary Department, 
32 showed an increase in price in 1911; on 
110 items the prices were the same; and on 
120 items there were reductions. 

Nineteen stores were maintained during the 
year, located at Cristobal, Gatun, Camp Tot- 
ten, Monte Lirio, Tabernilla, San Pablo, Gor- 
gona, Las Cascadas, Bas Obispo, Empire, 
Culebra, Rio Grande, Paraiso, Pedro Miguel, 
Corozal, Ancon, Porto Bello, and Toro Point. 
All stores except those at Camp Totten and 
Monte Lirio are provided with ice boxes of 
sufficient size to store meats and other perish- 
able goods. Butchers are employed at Cris- 
tobal, Gatun, Gorgona, Las Cascadas, Em- 
pire, Culebra, Ancon, and Balboa. 
MANUFACTURING PLANTS. 

Laundry — There was a large increase in this 
department during the year, 3,581,923 pieces 
having been handled, as against 2,993,761 
pieces during the previous year. During the 
first part of the year there was a reduction in 
prices ranging from 12.5 to 15 per cent. The 
revenue amounted to $9S,303.27, as against 
S90.797.56 last year. The average number of 
employes served monthly was 7,260, a de- 
crease of five from last year. 

Bakery — Sixteen thousand, six hundred 
and thirty-eight barrels o, flour were used 
during the year ending June 30, 1911, from 
which there were produced 5,236,474 loaves 
of bread, 557,557 rolls and 91.5S1 pounds of 
cake. The consumption of cake fell off 39,- 
086 pounds from the year before but the 
amount of bread produced was greater by 
344.(173 loaves, and of rolls 53,554. The total 
value of the product for the vcar was S221,- 
352.06. 

Coffee Roasting Plant — During the year 
330,491 pounds of coffee were roasted, pro- 
ducing 270.047J- pounds of roasted coffee. 
The value of the product wa $60,5 13.86. 

Ice Plant — The additional tank installed on 
June 17. 1910, increased the capacity of the 
plain suffii < mly to enable it to meet all de- 
mands for ice. The total output for the 
averaged about 90 tons per day and the pres- 
ent capacity of the plant is 100 tons per day; 
33,267 tons were produced during the year, 
valued ai $206,188.01. During the preceding 
year the amount manufactured (1~ 
tons), had to be supplemented during several 
months by purchase from private plants 
locally and importations from New York. 

Ice Cream Plant — During the year the ice 



cream plant was transferred to a new building 
erected for its use and with an increased 
capacity. The demand for the product grows 
steadi y and the department anticipates 
greater increase in the coming year. During 
the year ending June 30, 1911, the plant manu- 
factured 110,208 gallons, valued al $79,318.80, 
as against 91,321 gallons, valued at S62.379.- 
93, for the previous year. 

Automatic Weighing and Packing Depart- 
ment — By means of this arrangement Hour, 
coffee, beans, rice and similar loose, dry cook- 
ing materials are weighed and packed in boxes 
of convenient measure ready for immediate 
delivery to the customer. The cost of packing 
amounts to about SI. 90 per ton. Of varied 
articles a total of 3,915.775 pounds was 
packed this year, an increase of 1,445,815 
over last year. 

Power Plant — The installation of a 300-ton 
compressor, capable of running the entire ice- 
making and refrigerating plant and affording 
opportunity to close the other compressors 
for repairs, was completed during the year. 
The machinery has recently been subjected 
to overhauling and painting. 

Cold Storage Plant — Additional storage was 
necessary to take care of increased importa- 
tions and to provide a safer and more econom- 
ical method of handling refrigerated supplies. 
By the conversion of an ice storage room into 
a cooler and the installation of three new 
coolers, the storage space was increased by 
25,316 cubic feet, affording a total refrigerated 
storage space of 193,230 cubic feet. 

Pickling Tank and Butter Printing Outfit — 
The contracts under which the Commissary 
Department has purchased beef have provided 
that it be taken in the carcass or in the quarter 
but the greater demand for hindquarters than 
for forequarters has necessitated a preponder- 
ant importation of the former. The price of 
beef is cheaper by the carcass and the Depart- 
ment has, therefore, constructed during the 
past year two pickling tanks, with net cubical 
contents of 595 feet, for the purpose of corn- 
ing its own beef. By this means it is able to 
buy beef by the carcass, corn such of the fore- 
quar ers for which there is no sale, and dis- 
continue the importation of corned beef. 
The Department supplies from 1,500 to 2,000 
pounds of corned beef daily. 

Until this year butter has been bought in 
prints in the States, at an advance of about 
three cents per pound over butter in bulk. 
Moreover, in this way the surface exposure 
is greatly increased and it has to be carefully 
wrapped in tinfoil and parchment paper to 
preserve its freshness. A complete butter 
printing outfit has been installed in the cold 
storage plant and is now in full operation. 
It prints daily about 1,400 pounds of butter. 

Laboratory and Experimental Kitchen — 
During the year a laboratory and experi- 
mental kitchen were installed. All food pro- 
ducts are tested here, both as to quality and 
weight of package. Extract of vanilla, ex- 
tract of lemon, bay rum and other similar 
products arc manufactured here, effecting 
some economy. 



American Veterans of Foreign Service. 

The next regular muster and camp-fire, of 
the American Veterans of Foreign Service, 
will be held a, the Culebra I odge Hall on 
Saturday evening, November 4. 



76 



THE CANAL RECORD 



Vol. V., No. 10. 



TEST OF GATE VALVES. 



Experiments To Determine Friction Coefficients 
and Effectiveness of Sealing Devices. 

Tests of two Stoney gate valves for the 
locks, which have been in progress' at Gatun 
for several weeks, have been completed, and 
the valves have been found satisfactory. 

These valves will be installed in the cul- 
verts in the side and center walls of the locks, 
through which water from the upper levels 
will be let into the lock chambers, and will 
afford a means of regulating the flow. 

When a ship enters one of the chambers on 
the ascent, the valves above that chamber 
will be opened and those below will be closed, 
thus turning water into the chamber and 
raiding the ship. For a ship on the descent, 
the valves above will be closed and those 
below opened, thus allowing the water to flow 
from the chamber to a lower level, and conse- 
quently lowering the ship. A complete opera- 
tion of a valve, letting in or shutting off the 
water, will require one minute. 

At the points where the gate valves will be 
installed the culverts are 18 feet in diameter. 
Instead of closing the whole culvert with one 
valve, it has been divided into two chambers 
by a reinforced concrete pier in the center. 

The plan herewith gives a horizontal sec- 
tion of the valve chambers, showing the cen- 
ter pier, and the niches in which the gates of 




HORIZONTAL SECTION THROUGH VALVE CHAMBER, SHOW- 
ING CONCRETE PIER DIVIDING CULVERT INTO TWO 
CHAMBERS FOR VALVE EMPLACEMENT. Length 

of chamber 53 feet 6 inches; width. 20 feet 3 

inches; niches for valves l^Jinches deep; 

length of pier 25 feet 3 inches, 

width 4 feet 3 inches. 

the valves move. In operation the gates 

are moved up and down in these niches, on 

roller bearings, just as one would raise and 



lower a window, except that the power is 
applied through a stem fixed to the top of the 
gate and operated by a machine situated 
above the valve chamber. The valves con- 
sist of iron frames embedded in the concrete 
walls and movable gates built up of a frame- 
work of nickel steel "I" beams sheathed with 
|-inch nickel steel buckle plate, with ma- 
chinery to operate them. They are 1£ feet. 
10 inches high, 10 feet 8 inches wide, and 
will weigh 21,597 pounds each. An article 
describing these valves, and others of similar 
construction; (lower guard gate valves, lateral 
culvert valves, and bulkhead gates) was pub- 
lished in The Canal Record of August 
9, 1911. In all 130 rising stem gate valves, 
and 57 other gate valves will be used in the 
locks, and the tests completed last week apply 
to the 130 rising stem valves. 

FRICTION TESTS. 

In making these tests two valves were 
mounted in one of the valve chambers in the 
west side wall of the locks at Gatun, the cul- 
vert above the valves was closed, and the 
valve chamber was then filled with water to a 
height of 79 feet. The tests were made to 
determine the total friction and the effective- 
ness of the sealing device. 

In designing the machinery it was assumed 
that the friction to be overcome would be 4 
per cent of the water pressure. It remained 
to determine by test the actual frictional 
resistance of the valves when operated under 
pressure, which resistance added to the 
weight of the gates and one half the roller 
trains equals the weight that each machine 
must be capable of lifting. On the theo- 
retical assumptions the total weight each 
machine must lift was placed at 40,000 pounds. 
The machines were designed to lift 60,000 
pounds, and the tests show that the actual 
weight to be lifted will be between 41,500 and 
44,500 pounds. The results of the tests for 
the determination of the coefficient of friction 
have been tabulated as follows: 



Item. 


Gate 260 


Gate 261 


Pull required to lift gate — Cul- 


Lbs 

24,000 

20,500 

3,500 

4,170 
7,670 

65 1 ,0C0 
37,500 

5,420 
42.920 
20,500 
22.420 

7.670 
14.750 
41,500 

4.000 
26.420 


Lbs. 
25.000 




20,500 


Friction of seals — initial 

Friction of seals — added for 

Friction for seals — total 

Total pressure on gate — (Cal- 
culated — h— 79') 


4.500 

4,170 
8.670 

651,000 


Dynamometer pull to break seal 
Lifting force on upper sea! (Cal- 
culated) 


40,000 

5,420 
45,420 


Weight of gate — (calculated) . . 

Total friction 

Friction of seal from above. . . . 


20.500 

24.920 

8.670 

16 250 


Dynamometer pull to hold gate 


44,500 
4,500 


Total friction plus suction 


29.420 


Coefficient of friction — total (2> 
Coefficient of roller friction (3) . 
Combined coefficient (4) 


•0344 
.0226 
.0407 


.0383 
.0251 
.0460 



(1) Friction of s?als under water pressure is calculated 
using 0.25 as coefficient. 

,' x 62.5 x 69.7 x .25=4170 pounds. 

(2) Average coefficient of friction — total .0363 

(3) Average coefficient of roller friction .0239 

(4) Average combined coefficient .0433 

SEALING DEVICES. 

Each gate will move in its niches on a live 
roller train, and there will be a play of J of 
an inch both laterally and up stream. Under 
a head, a large amount of water would pass 
between the gate and the niches in which it 
moves, if some method of sealing the gate 
were not provided. At the bottom the gate, 
when closed, will rest upon babbit metal fixed 



to the sill, and at the top there will be a seal 
of rubber on the gate which will press tightly 
against the valve casing. 

The side seals are a new device proposed 
by a designing engineer in the office of the 
Assistant Chief Engineer. They consist of a 
plate of 1/16 inch phosphor bronze 18 feet 
long fixed to each side of the gate with its 
free end bearing upon a guide in the valve 
casing. When the gate is moved up or down 




SECTION THROUGH GATE VALVE SHOWING METHOD OF 

ATTACHING BRONZE SEALING DEVICE. UPSTREAM 

SIDE IS TOWARD TOP OF PAGE. 

in opening or closing the valve the bronze 
seal moves with it. When the gate is down, 
and the valve, therefore, closed, the seals 
at bottom, top and sides meet and make 
the closure practically complete. The draw- 
ing herewith shows the position of the side 
sealing device upon the gate and its bearing 
upon the valve frame. There will be required 
260 sealing devices, with a total of 29,340 
pounds of rolled bronze spring straps, 67,210 
pounds of cast bronze guides, and 11,670 
pounds of bronze bolts and washers. 

The tests showed a maximum leakage under 
a 79-foot head for two valves of 1.82 cubic 
feet per second or 819 gallons a minute. 
Under operating conditions, when there will 
be a head of thirty feet, the leakage for a pair 
of valves will be about 0.S of a cubic foot 
per second. 



Misdirected Letters. 
Ancon, C. Z., November 1, 1911. 
The following insufficiently addressed letters origi- 
nating in the United States and its possessions, have 
been received in the office of the Director of Posts, and 
may be secured upon request of the a'ddressees: 



Buchanan, Reuben 

Byrne. Joseph A. 

Cason. John B. 

Cox. Clevis M. 

De Caen. Mrs. Richard 

Frederikson, Frederick F. 

Gibson, Fred C. 

Harajian, Horan 

Holt, Max 

Janis, William 

King, Miss Bella 

King, Harry (pkg.) 

Little, J. A. 

McFarlane, Simon R. W. 

McGrath. Mrs. Bessie 



Mezzone, Pasquale 
Murray, James E. 
Nelson, Elliott 
Olmstead, Harry J. 
Portugal. Ch. H. 
Powell. Miss Lula 
Rawley, Frank 
Rigaces, Umberte 
Roberts, Dr. C. W. 
Schafer, M. Rex 
Spooner, M. 
Sulway, David 
Turner, Miss Carrie 
Watson, Simeon 
Williams, John H 



Band Concert 

A band concert will be given by the Isthmian Canal 
Commission Band at Gatun, C. Z., on Sunday, Nov- 
embct 5, 1911, at 5 p. m. 

The next concert will be given at Gorgona, on Nov- 
ember 12, at 6.00 p. m. 



Tide Table. 

The following table shows the time of high and low 
tides at Panama for the week ending November 8,1911 
(75th meridian time): 



Date. 


Low. 


High. 


Low. 


High. 




A.M. 

12.45 
1.30 
2.15 
3.00 
3.38 
4.20 


A.M. 
6.15 
7.05 
7.50 
8.35 
9.15 
10.00 
10.40 


P.M. 
12.25 
1.15 
2.00 
2.45 
3.25 
4.05 
4.50 


P.M. 
6.35 




7.25 




S. 10 




8.50 




9.35 




10.15 




11.00 







November 1, 1911. 



THE CANAL RECORD 



77 



LOCK MACHINES ERECTION. 



Plant Required and Conditions of its L'se. 

New plant to the value of over forty thous- 
and dollars will be required for the erection of 
lock operating machinery at Gatun, Pedro 
Miguel, and Mirallores, and a requisition for 
this plant, consisting of four locomotive cranes 
and four stiff leg derricks has been made on the 
Washington office. The specifications are so 
framed that manufacturers may offer cranes 
■ >r derricks of standard makes conforming 
substantially to the requirements. 

In the study of the conditions under which 
the operating machinery will be installed, the 
e of the Assistant Chief Engineer, under 
whom this work will be done, has determined 
that there will be required, besides the new 
plant mentioned above, four locomotive 
cranes now on the Isthmus, which will be 
transferred from other work. The amount of 
plant required is lessened by the fact that the 
erection at Miraflores will be approaching its 
summit point while that at Gatun will have 
passed that stage, and thus plant used at 
Gatun may be transferred to Miraflores. It 
is estimated that a total of 131.2S4 tons of 
material must be handled in the erection 
work, divided as follows: 



Item. 




Quantity. 


Tons. 


Machines, including chain 


fend- 


536 

97,854 

1.110 

50.000 


Ij.616 


Track, feet 


S.117 




1,251 




7 (11)11 




1,300 


Concrete, cubic yards .... 




100,000 






131,284 







The erection period is estimated as eighteen 
months from January 1, 1912. The greater 
portion of the machinery will be handled at 
least twice, in addition to handling in and out 
of storage. Assuming that one crane is the 
equivalent of two derricks, making the plant 
consist of ten working units, the following 
figures are an expression of the work to be 
performed : 

Total tonnage handled 

by each crane 7,293 tons. 

Average total per crane 
per month. . . . 

Average total per crane 

per day 

Average concrete per 

crane per month* 536 tons. 

Average steel per crane 

per month 

Average number of ma- 
chines set per crane per 
month 



729 tons. 



29 



7 . 2 tons. 



1 



*The amount of concrete to be handled per month is 
small due to the delicate work and long waits inevitable 
in the setting of heavy machine parts. 

In general the lock operating machinery 
is centralized in small groups at various parts 
of the locks; rendering the partial use of 
derricks feasible. At Gatun for instance there 
are ten of these groups in the center wall, and it 
will always be possible to handle four machines 
from one location, and frequently to serve six 
machines at one setting of a derrick. The 
machine pits are in the lock Walls and all the 
handling will be done from the top of the walls. 
Owing to the bridges used in the miter gate 
erection, it has been decided to use derricks 
on the center walls, in preference to locomo- 
tive cranes. On the side walls, where the 
miter gate construction bridges do not inter- 



fere with free movement along the wall. loco- 
motive cranes will be used. 

Locomotive Cranes. — The locomotive cranes 
called for under the specifications must be 
capable of handling 8,000 pounds at a 40 
foot radius (the horizontal distance between 
the centers of tin? hoisting hook and the crane 
center pin or post) when the outriggers arc 
not in use; and 30,000 pounds at a 15-foot 
radius. They must operate on the 5-foot 
gage track, clear the rack in the center of 
the tracks, which requires 8 inches above 
the top of the traction rail, in the center, 
and elsewhere have a clearance of at least 6 
inches, have a chain or gear drive for self 
propulsion along the track at the rate of five 
miles an hour when fully loaded, and be 
capable of self propulsion up a 3 per cent 
grade when heavily loaded. The engine must 
be double and provided with a locomotive 
link reversing motion or a reversible hoisting 
gear. The drum must be not less than 36 
inches in diameter, drum friction not less than 
42 inches, and the length if possible sufficient 
to take the whole line without an overlap. 
The hoisting line must be f-inch plow steel 
with hemp center, and so long that the load 
may be hooked on 70 feet below the top of the 
rails, with the boom at the minimum radius. 

Stiff-leg Derricks. — The derricks will be of 
steel construction and of the common stiff-leg 
type, mounted upon skids or shoes in order 
that they may be moved with the minimum 
amount of work. They must be capable of 
lifting and swinging safely a maximum load 
of 22,000 poundsat a radius of forty feet. The 
boom must be 70 feet long from center of foot 
pin to center of out sheaves, and must have a 
swing of nearly three quadrants. The mast 
is to be of the minimum possible height, and 
will rotate upon ball and socket bearings. 
The bull wheel shall be not les- than 12 nor 
more than 14 feet in diameter. The lines must 
be not less than I inch diameter, oi hemp 
rente- plow steel wire, and Ion.', enough to 
make a 70-foot lift. 

Power will be supplied from a double engine 
and vertical boiler, which, with the hoisting 
drums and gear, will be mounted upon a cast 
iron or structural steel bedplate securely 
bolted to the base frame. There will be two 
drums, with one reversible drum swinging 
gear, equipped with friction clutches, ratchets, 
pawls, and operating levers complete. At 
least one of the drums must be equipped with 
a shaft extension and winch. The drums 
must be 16 inches in diameter and, if possible, 
of sufficient length to take the whole of the 
hoisting line without overlapping. An alter- 
native bid is requested upon an electric hoist, 
the driving motor to operate upon a three- 
phase, 25 cycle, 220 volt, secondary circuit. 



OFFICIAL CIRCULARS. 



Stages of the Chagces. 

Maximum heights of the Chagres River for the week 
ending midnight, Saturday, October 28, 1911. All 
heights are in feet above mean sea level. 







Station. 






Day and Date. 


Vigia. 


a 

■a 

JS 

3 


o 

a 

(4 

o 


6 

IS 
o 

£3 


is 
33 


Sun., Oct. 2-'., 
Mon..U 
Tues.,Oct. 24. . 
Wed., I> 
Thurs.. Oct. 26. 
Fri.. Oct. 27.. .. 
Sat.. Oct. 28 . . . 


127.3 
12 7 3 
131.7 
137.fi 
133.3 
127.3 


93 6 
93 7 
96 8 
ton ,, 
99 5 
93.7 


47 .0 
46.5 
52.0 
54.3 
55.0 
47.3 
46.3 


15.6 
IS 4 

16.1 

IS i, 
210 
18.6 
18.1 


1.5.2 
15.3 
15.6 
17.0 
18.1 
18.1 
17.8 


Height of low 


125.0 


■,■ h 


44.0 







Private Work by I. G. C. and P. R. R. Employes. 

Culebra. C. Z, October 26. 1911. 
Circular No. 417: 

No employe of the Isthmian Canal Commission or 
Panama Railroad Company will perform work for any 
individual or company during the employe's regular 
workiii sa the performance of the work has 

b i authorized by this office on Form C. E. 159 and 
the usual work order isused by the proper official, 
except that the Chief Quartermaster is authorized 
to approve the performance of work by employes 
of the iter's Department for employes of 

the Isthmian I i oal Commission and the Panama 
Railroad Company when the total cost of the job does 
not exceed ten dollars. 

Heads of divisions, departments and shops are author- 
ized to permit employes of the Isthmian Canal Com- 
mission and the Panama Railroad Company to use 
machines, tools, etc., in the performance of pi: 
work for employes only, provided the work is not 
performed by the employe during his regular working 
hours, the machine and tools can be spared for such 
use, and the use of them for the purpose will not result 
in their being injured. 

Geo. VV. Goethals, 
Chairman and Chief Engineer, 



Ink on Pay Certificates. 

Empire, C. Z., October id, 1911. 
All Departments: 

An ink called "Combined Copying and Writing Fluid" 
isnowbeingfurnished from the Mount Hope Storehouse 
which when used upon pay certificates isinctined to run, 
making the figures uncertain, which is particularly 
inconvenient when the brass check number is so affected 
and I have to request that this ink be not used in writ- 
ing pay certificates and time vouchers. Only black 
writing fluid should be used for such purposes. 
Respectfully, 

\V. M.Wood. 
Approved : Disbursing Officer. 

Geo. W. Goethals, 

Chairman and Chief Engineer. 



Sale of Panama Cafe Building. 
Panama Railroad Company. 
Office of General Superintendent, 

Colon. R. P., October 27, 1911. 
Sealed proposals for trie purchase of building located 
on lot north of Panama passenger staiion, and known as 
"Panama Railroad Cafe" building, will be received in 
tnis office until J. 00 p. m.. November 2u, and then 
opened. 

3ids must be made for the building as it stands on the 
ground, the successful bidder to remove Lhe building 
within tuirty days' time after notified that bid has been 
accepted. 

Proposal-* snould be accompanied by certified c.ieck. 
Post Office money order, or c?sh. for 5 per cent of the 
amount of bid, whicn will be returned to unsuccessful 
bidders. 

The successful bidder will be given a freight rote of 
S2.25 per ton in case it is desired to ship the niateiial to 
any point along the line. 

Envelopes containing bid? should be endorsed: "Pro- 
posal for purchase of "Panama Railroad Cafe Build- 
ing." and addressed to 

J. A. Smith, 
General Superintendent. 
Panama Railroad Company. 



Rainfall from October 1 to 28, 1911, Inclusive. 



Stations. 



Pacific Section 

Ancon 

Balboa 

*Miraflores 

Pedro Miguel. . . . 

Rio Grande 

Central Section. 

Culebra 

♦Camacho 

Empire 

Gamboa 

♦Juan Mina 

Alhajuela 

*E1 Vigia 

♦Gorgona 

San Pablo 

Tabernilla 

Bohio 

♦Monte Lirio 

Atlantic Section — 

Gatun 

♦Brazos Brook.. . . 

Colon 

Porto Bello 

♦Nombre de Dios. 



c 






E =- 












3-a 




o-a 


ho 


a* 




s 


afl 
Q 


S& 


Ins. 




1ns. 


4.47 


9 


9.47 


2.58 


9 


7.34 


2 00 


18 


8.29 


1.93 


24 


11.19 


2.34 


5 


13.83 


2.64 


1 


14.40 


2 91 


1 


16.36 


2.15 


1 


13.19 


1.76 


21 


11.37 


2.03 


21 


10.48 




24 


11.63 


l 58 


24 


13.27 


3.07 


24 


11.56 


1 86 


24 


7.06 


2 41 


24 


9. 12 


1 41 


3 


9.63 


2 09 


6 


10.70 


2 42 


24 


13 33 


1 67 


13 


9.72 


2.73 


24 


12.94 


2.67 


2 


10.69 


1.30 


12 


5.66 



78 



THE CANAL RECORD 



Vol. V., No. 10. 



SOCIAL LIFE OF THE ZONE. 



Work of Various Organizations. 

There will be a meeting of the executive 
baard of the Canal Zone Federation of 
Women's Clubs at the Commission clubhouse, 
Empire, on Monday afternoon, November 6, 
at 2.30 o'clock. 

Meetings of the Gatun Woman's Club were 
resumed in October. There will be two meet- 
ings in each month. On the second Thursday 
the meeting will be devoted to the business 
of the club, and on the fourth Thursday there 
will be a social meeting with a program under 
the social and literary committee. The club 
will hold a social evening for their friends in 
December. 

Meetings of the Paraiso Woman's Club for 
the months of November and December will 
be as follows: On Wednesday, November 1 
and 15, there will be business meetings with a 
program and on December 6 and 20, meetings 
with programs. At the meeting on October 
18, the subject of woman suffrage was dis- 
cussed. 

On November 8, the home department of 
the Cristobal Woman's Club will have as its 
program the discussion of home life in Switzer- 
land. 

The Little Workers, a sewing club com- 
posed of young girls, was organized at Gor- 
gona on Friday, October 20. The purpose of 
the club is to teach the members plain sewing, 
button hole making, and embroidery, and to 
promote a social feeling among the young 
girls of the village. The meetings will be held 
weekly on Saturdays at the homes of the mem- 
bers. The officers are, Jane Calvit, president; 
Mary Halligan, vice-president, and Anna 
Cody, secretary. 



Charity Ball at Cristobal. 

The annua! charity ball of the Cristobal 
Woman's Club will be held at the Commis- 
sion clubhouse on Thursday evening, No- 
vember 2. The receipts will be devoted to- 
ward defraying the expenses of the anti- 
tuberculosis work that is being carried on 
under the auspices of the club in the city of 
Colon. 



Church Notes. 

The Culebra Christian League held a 
"social" and entertainment at the Commis- 
sion chapel on Thursday evening, October 26. 
There was a program consisting of musical 
selections and recitations. This is the first 
entertainment that has been given by the 
league since August. It is the intention to 
hold a monthly entertainment in order to keep 
up social interest among the members of the 
organization. 

On Sunday, November 12, the Isthmian 
Sunday School Association will hold a con- 
vention in the chapel at Gorgona, beginning 
at 2.15 p. m. The speakers will be Commis- 
sioner Maurice H. Thatcher, who will deliver 
an address on Sunday school work, Judge 
Thomas E. Brown, who will speak on the 
value of Bible study, and the Rev. Aquila 
Lucas, who will lead a discussion of practical 
work in the Sunday school and teacher;.' 
problems. Officers and teachers in all of 
the Sunday Schools are urgently invited to be 
present, and others interested in the work 
will be welcomed. 

The corporate communion of the Woman's 
Altar Guild of St. Luke's Church, Ancon, will 
be held on November 1, at 9 a. m. The 
annual meeting, with election of officers, will 



be held at the Hotel Tivoli on Tuesday, No- 
vember 7, at 3.30 p. m. 

The Ladies Aid Society of the Methodist 
Episcopal Church will hold its annual bazar 
at Ancon hall on November 17. There will be 
booths containing fancy articles, cakes, candies 
and ice cream. 

The bazar is given in aid of the work of the 
society. The sale will be open both afternoon 
and evening. 

Two Sunday schools have been organized at 
Balboa and at East Balboa by representatives 
of the Methodist Episcopal Church. At old 
Balboa the school is held in the mess hall at 
2 p. m. and has an enrollment of 25 and one 
teacher. The East Balboa school meets in 
the hotel at 3 p. m. There are 25 pupils and 
several teachers. 

The woman's altar guild of Christ Church, 
Colon, held a musical and tea at the club- 
house on Saturday afternoon, October 28. 
The receipts, which amounted to nearly $100, 
will be used to meet the deficit in the church 
expenses. The program given was as follows: 
Piano solo, prelude, Rach Manieff, Miss 
Dorothy Leyland; baritone solo, (a) Thora, 
Stephen Adams, (b) A Rose In Heaocn, 
selected, Mr. R. Moshcr; violin solo, (a) Les 
Audeaux, Pab'.e de Sarneate, (b) Seranade, 
Par R. Drige, Dr. Eugene Hill; contralto 
solo, (a) Violets, Ray Remaine, (b) Ma Curly 
Headed Baby, selected, Miss Bessie M. Sew- 
eney; tenor solo, (a) Pagliacci, R. Leonacealle 
(b) No e Yer, Sito Mattei, Arture Petrozzoni; 
piano solo, Polanaise, Chopin, Miss Dorothy 
Leyland; baritone solo, (a) If You Were 
There, Frank L. Prince, (6) Asthore, H. Tre- 
tere, William Bennvhoff. 



PERSONAL. 



Order of the Eastern Star. 
On Wednesday, October 25, Orchid Chap- 
ter, No. 1, Order of the Eastern Star was 
organized in the lodge hall at Gorgona. The 
Rev. Willis D. Engle, of Indianapolis. Worthy 
Grand Patron of the General Grand Chapter 
of the order, performed the rites of institution, 
assisted by Past Grand Worthy Matron, Mrs. 
Rosetta Brown. There were 73 charter mem- 
bers. The meering was in two sessions begin- 
ning at 2.30 p. m. with a recess at 5 o'clock. 
The evening session closed with a reception. 
The officers installed were as follows. Worthy 
Matron, Mrs. Annie L. Calvit; Worthy 
Patron, Washington van Arsdale; Associate 
Matron, Mrs. Jennie Jones; Secretary, Mrs. 
Katherine Casey; Treasurer, Mrs. Agnes 
Fahr; Conductress, Mrs. Minnie Rosier; 
Associate Conductress, Mrs. Agnes Mc- 
Combs; Chaplain, Mrs. Eleanor Babbitt; 
Marshall, Mrs. Martha Wilson: Organist, 
Mrs. Ada Shady. The five points of the star 
are represented by Mrs. Ceporiah Bain, Mrs. 
May Jarvis, Mrs. Emma Fahr. Mrs. Anna 
Lucachese. and Mrs. Emma Wilson. Mrs. 
Lily M. Houston is the wardei and Stephen 
E. Caivit is the sentinel. The new chapter 
will hold meetings on the second W'edncsday 
evening in each month at 7.30 o'clock and on 
the fourth Wednesday afternoon in each 
month at 3 o'clock. 

M. J. McCarty, an American formerly in 
the Canal employ, and latterly employed by 
the Panaman Government in well drilling 
in the interior of the Republic, shot him- 
self through the head on Saturday night, 
October 28, while on his way from Pedro 
Miguel to Paraiso. He was about 40 years of 
age and had lived on the isthmus since the 
beginning of the American occupation. 



Lieut. -Col. W. L. Sibert sailed on the Ancon 
on October 31, for the States, on leave. 

Among the passengers on the Panama, 
which arrived on October 30, were. Lieut.-Col. 
C. A. Devol, with Mrs. Devol, Mr. S. B. 
Williamson, Mr. C. M. Saville with Mrs. 
Saville and Mr. E. J. Williams. 

The Hon. H. Percival Dodge, accompanied 
by Mrs. Dodge and their daughter, arrived 
from France on October 29, to take up his 
duties as American Minister to Panama. 
They are at present at the Hotel Tivoli. 

The party of Senators, who arrived on the 
Isthmus on the Ancon on October 21, spent 
several days in going over the line of the Canal 
inspecting various phases of the work, and 
devoted the closing days of their visit to hear- 
ings at the Hotel Tivoli. All the members of 
the party with the exception of Senators 
Wetmore and Thornton returned on the 
Ancon, leaving the Isthmus on October 31. 
Senator Wetmore has been ill at Ancon Hos- 
pital during the entire visit and will not be 
able to travel for several days. Senator 
Thornton will return to New Orleans on the 
United Fruit Company ship on November 2. 



Missing Man. 
Any one having information regarding the 
whereabouts of Oskar Fischer (Oscar Fisher), 
who is supposed to be on the Isthmus of Pan- 
ama, is requested to communicate with The 
Canal Record. 



Pilots, Mates, Masters, Engineers, Chauffeurs. 
Examinations for pilots, mates, masters 
and engineers; and for chauffeurs, will be 
held by the Board of Local Inspectors at the 
Administration Building, Ancon, November 
8, 1911. All applicants for license as chauf- 
feurs must secure from the Department of 
Civil Administration, Executive Office, Ancon, 
forms of application, and information respect- 
ing the filling out of the same, not later than 
the day previous to the examination. All 
applicants for examination must be present 
at the Administration Building at 8.00 a. m. 
on November S, with papers in proper form. 
In addition, applicants for chauffeurs' licenses 
must demonstrate their capacity properly to 
operate an automobile, and must have the 
automobile with them. 



Ancon Crusher. 

A statement of rock crushed at the Ancon 
quarry during the week ending October 27, 
follows: 





Date. 


Hours 
worked. 


Cubic 
Yards. 


October 23 


6.50 
7.05 

* 
7.05 
9.00 






2,523 
400 










3 200 








Total 


38.00 


10.760 





*Crushershut down, putting new shaft in No. 12 
crusher. 



The Knights of Pythias of Gatun will take 
a sightseeing trip over the relocation of the 
Panama railroad, between Gatun and Gam- 
boa, through Culebra Cut, over the Pacific 
Division work, and out upon the Naos Island 
breakwater on November 3. 



November 1, 1911. 



THE CANAL RECORD 



79 



COMMISSION CLUBHOUSES. 



Activities of the Young Men's Christian Associa- 
tion. 

The standing of the teams of the Isthiman Basket 
Ball League on October 28, was as follows: 

Cristobal 4 1.000 

Gorgona 3 1 . 750 

Gatun 3 1 .750 

Culebra 2 2 500 

Empire 4 .000 

Corozal 4 .000 

The result of basket ball games played on October 
28. were as follows: Cristobal, 25. Corozal, 10; Gor- 
gona. 23, Culebra. 11; Gatun. 20, Empire, 15. Games 
to be played November 4, are: Empire at Cristobal; 
Gatun at Culebra. 

COROZAL. 

Dr. Connor, Acting Health Officer of Panama, gave 
an informal lecture Wednesday evening on the subject 
"Tuberculosis." A general discussion followed the 
lecture. 

The pool tournament closed with Mr. Baker winning 
the cue. Messrs. Norenberg and Jones tied for second 
place. A handicap tournament will be started in the 
near future. Those desiring to enter should hand their 
names to Manager Wilson. 

CULEBRA. 

The following are the results of the league bowling 
game& for the week: 

Culebra Empire. 

Mitchell... 134 142 166 Gus 189 140 165 

Herrington. 204 170 143 Gorham... 144 162 198 

DriscoU.... 162 159 140 Pearson.... 170 169 199 

Case 182 171 232 Huson 149 159 169 

Dougherty. 171 215 180 Spinehr.... 132 162 171 

Totals 853 857 861 7X4 792 902 

The following are the names of the men that played 
the volley ball game between the Chief Engineers, 
and the Union Christian League: 

League. Chief Engineers. 

Warner Flieschman 

Kramer Coppin 

Herrington Baume 

Vanzandt Stillwell 

Wilmont Kaufman 

Hoffmann Barcroft 

The score was 3 to 1 in favor of the Chief Engineers. 

The following is the program that was given Sunday 
evening by the choruses of Corozal and Culebra: 

Introduction. Orchestra; song. Holy. Holy, Holy, 
Congregation; Bible reading and prayer, the Rev. A. 
A. Nellis; solo. Penitent. Van de Water. Mrs. G. R. D. 
Kramer; Unfold ye Portals (Redemption). Gounod, 
chorus; Address, the Rev. A. A. Nellis; duet. Silent 
Night. Mr. and Mrs. Kramer; Holy art Thou (Largo). 
Xerxes. Choru-; Ninety and Nine, Campion. Mrs. 
Boyd; The Heavens are Telling, Creation, Chorus; 



My Country 'Tis of Thee. Congregation. Besides 
those mentioned, fourteen others took part. 
EMPIRE, 

The following high scores were bowled on the Empire 
alleys during the past week: Duckpins — Dakin. 105; 
Rodeigherio. 119. 104; Grund, 11)1; Tenpins—!' 
215; Spinks, 208; lluson. 211. 

Empire took three straight games from the Culebra 
team on Saturday night. October 28. on the Empire 
alleys, by the following scores: 

Empire. Culebra. 

Pinney 171 158 157 Conlan 138 158 143 

G i -Hi.... 169 163 193 Judge 138 103 118 

Anderson... 131 13(1 Sgolham... 168 142 120 

Davis 196 146 175 Fay 174 136 154 

Parkia 17.; 142 145 Baumer.... 177 130 127 

Snyder 155 

Total 840 764 800 795 669 664 

On Tuesday night, October 31. Dr. Conner. Acting 
Health Officer of Panama, gave a lecture on "Tuber- 
culosis" undet th'- auspices of the Literary and Debat- 
ing Society. 

GORGONA, 

The Social Study Club was organized on Friday at 
7:30. there being twenty-two persons present. The 
subjects discussed were, "The Works of the World;" 
Christ's Valuation of Life;" and "Increasing number 
of Accidents." The class will meet every Friday 
evening at 7:30. and all are invited to attend. 

The Cristobal bowlers took two out of three games 
from the local team on Gorgona's alleys on Saturday 
night, the scores being as follows: 

Cristobal Gorgona. 

Barrett 206 144 174 Roper 182 168 171 

Herring.... 201 137 185 Hutter 180 158 212 

Wheeler 159 187 179 R. Van 184 139 147 

Rosteik 150 155 179 Sexton 147 183 151 

Burns 172 14,5 170 Haggerty.. 171 155 144 

Totals 888 766 887 864 803 S25 

About one hundred and forty people attended the 
weekly song service last Sunday evening. Mrs. Shady 
played the piano. Mr. E. Reinhold the violin and Mr. 
J. T. Hopkins the cornet. Sunday evening November 
5 the weekly song service will be held at 7.00 
preceded by moving pictures portraying the Bible scene 
"Christ and the Woman at the Well." 

The physical department has made arrangements to 
give massage in the locker room on Tuesday and Friday 
evenings. 

Tennis is being played in the gymnasium from 5.00 to 
7.00 o'clock on all evenings when it does not interfere 
with other arrangements. All members are eligible to 
participate. 

GATUN. 

Gatun won all the three games of bowling from Camp 
Elliott on Saturday evening, October 28. The scores 
are as follows: 



Gatun. I Blliott. 

Omeara 121 129 1R2 Weigely . . 169 140 127 

Chamber'n. 130 172 171 Kribel.... 14S 131 155 

DeMoll.... 196 181 I .. HI 142 168 

Galloway.. 155 203 1 7.3 McDowell. 133 ISO 147 

Barte 191 102 176 Clause 210 154 152 

Total.... 793 877 828 791 717 749 

The initial meeting of the discussion club was held on 
Sunday evening October 29. The subject was "Em- 
ployers' Liability.'' The club will meet every Sunday 
evening from 6 to 7 o'clock. 

Dr. Connor will give a lecture at the clul 
Wednesday evening November 29. on "Tuberculosis," 
A class for the study of Spanish by the conversational 
and objective met ho,] v . ill l>e formed at tie Gatun 
house in the near future. Senor lose Gomez, formerly 
a student at the Institute of Seville in Spain and of the 
University of Havana will be the leader. A charge of 
twenty-rive cents per lesson will be made. It has not 
yet been decided how lone the course will run. No text 
books will be required. If th :re lent number 

of women in Gatun who care to study Spanish a class 
will be formed exclusively for women. 

A hand ball tournament will be started on Novem- 
ber 9. 

CRISTOBAL. 

On Wednesday night October 25. L. A. Mason gave 
an address on the Installation and Operation of Lock 
Machinery. 

Senators Bristow and Cummins addressed the De- 
bating Club on the evening of Monday, October 30. 

On Wednesday November 8. at the Literary and 
Debating Club an address. "The Imrn artal Abraham 
Lincoln," will be given by W. F. Morrison. 

The Discussion Club will he iead on November 6, by 
W. H. Warr secretary at Empire. 

The Cristobal bowlii won two out of three 

games from Gorgona on the local alleys on Saturday 
night by the following scores: 

Gorgona. Cristobil. 

Arnold 153 141 131 Gibson... 150 157 no 

Sims 216 167 131 Blickburn. 173 1S7 11'. 

Lowe 141 152 120 Collins 144 1SS 207 

OrrJ 165 184 155 Billiard... 175 190 187 

Van M . . . 161 130 171 Louch 171 234 169 

Total.... 836 774 711 S13 956 821 

On Friday November 3. in the afternoon and evening 
there will be a local duck pin tournament for the indi- 
vidual championship of Cristobal. An entrance fee of 50 
cents will be charged. All entries must be made before 
the day of the tournament. Messrs. Smith. Herrington 
and Weston are the committee in charge of the tourna- 
ment and all entries are to be made to one of tham. 
* The following high scores were made in Duck pins 
during the week ending October 28: Louch, 114. 105 
10S. 116; Poore. 101; Vanderberg, 100; Marquez, 112, 
E.Orr, 104, 106. 101; Wheeler. 120; Herring. 109, 104; 
Smith. 105. 105; Weston, 117, 101; Howard. 100. 



PANAMA RAILROAD COMPANY. 



PASSENGER TRAIN TIME TABLE No. lO-IN EFFECT JULY 24. 1911. 



SUN. 
ONLY. 



73 



A. M. 

12.30 
12.35 
12.45 



S12 5S 
1.23 
1 32 

S 1.42 

1.49 

1.55 
5 

s 2.15 
s 221 

s 2.35 

s 2.45 

s : 
s 

s 3.12 



s 3.25 



3.30 

A. M. 



SOCTHWAKI). 



SAT. 
ONLY 



71 



SUNDAY ONLY. 



DAILY EXCEPT Sl'N 
DAY. 



«s» S7 



P. M 



f 4.44 

- 4 51 

- 4.58 



p. M. p. U, 

6.00 7.00 

s 6.05 s 7.05 

6.10 f7.1(> 

6.15 f7.ll 

s 6 1- 

f 6.41 s 7.41 

f 6 47 s7 51 

s fj.55 

s 6.57 

f 7.03 

s 7.11 - 8.15 

s 7.16 

s 7.-0 

s 7.26 
s 7.32 - 

s 

s 7.56 s s.59 s 5.59 



4.00 1.00 10.00 6.45 4 35 

- I.oa s l.o5 > 10.05 s 5.50 f 4.40 

4.10 1.10 f 10.10 6.55 4.45 

i 4.K, f 1.16 f 10 li f 7.01 f 1 50 

s4.20 s 1.20 s 10.20 s 7.05 s I 5! 



P. M. 



M. 



A. M. P. M. 



f 144 
- 1.51 
s 1 58 



* 5.03 5 2 03 

i 5.09 f 2.09 

5.20 s- 2.20 
5.25 s 2.25 



9 5.11 
5.S4 



S9.07 
f 83V. 

8.10 9.15 
P. M. P. 11. 



71 



89 



<6.07 

f 6 09 

6 1.. 

p M. 



-'. 



S2.3I 

< 2.43 
f 2.52 

s2.59 

P. M. 



f 10.44 f7.29 f 5. ,6 

f 5 22 
- 5 28 

S1103 

r lij - t - - 

s 11.15 

5 s 5.51 
111.25 



s 11.37 
s 1 1 .43 



s s 16 's 6.01 
s 11.51 



P M 

s 12.07 



12.15 



' 



■J.-. 



A. M 

f 10.1.1 

1 .38 
f 10.43 

s 10.47 
f 11.11 

f 11 18 



A. M. 

5 20 
f 5.25 
S5.31 
f 5.36 

8 5.41 

f 6.05 

f 6.12 

6.19 



f 11.35 
s 1 1 . i : - 
sll.49 
s 11.55 

I' M. 

' 

s 12.32 

s 12.3- 

f 124' f 7.55 

P. M. A M. 



: s 

2 -' 



0.00 
1 77 
4.37 
5.94 

6.79 

' 
25 74 



STATIONS. 



N'iKTIIWARI). 



DAILY EXCEPT SUNDAY 



Air, 



Lenve, 

.Colon 

IMI Hope .. 

TMinrii 

New Gatun.. 

IGatun 

iBohio 

Frijoles 

rTabernilla.,. 

ISan Pablo... 
I Mamei . . 

inn 

bin .. . 



.. m. p. M. 

1.00 

v 3.47 f 12 57 

98.41 f 12.51 

SS.35 f 12.45 



c; 



- 

s7.2o 



s 12.41 
f 12.16 

P. M. 

s 11.42 

s 11.56 



P. M. 

3.45 

f 3.43 

13.32 

^ ! 2 

s 2.31 
s J. .'1 



7.45 
f 7.42 
f 7.36 



SUNDAY ONLY 



DAY 



SO 



A. M. 

f R.51 



- 

S6.41 s7^ 
f 6.35 f 7 A 

S6.21 s7 1" 



. 



S 7.16 s 11.26 
9 11.15 

11.02 

orozal 

i f 10 45 

.» it. Leave a. m. \ u. 



1-7 



s _' 

- 

jl.44 si 



- 



■lTi-1. station 
f Mag station. 



15 6.45 
t. a. si. 



X 



•:n 




•No. 73 is a mixed train, carrying one or two first class r 
t Saturday night. 



80 



THE CANAL RECORD 



Vol. V., No. 10. 



COMMISSARY DEPARTMENT. 

The commissaries are open during the following 
hours: 

Cristobal, 8 a. m. to 12.30 p. m., and 2 to 7 p. m. 

Balboa, 8 a. m. to 12.30 p. m., and 2.30 to 7 p. m. 
Ancon, 8 a. m. to I p. m., and 3 to 6 p. m. 
All others, 8 a. m. to 1 p. m., and 3 t<J 7 p. m. 

Retail prices of cold storage provisions for the week 
beginning November 1, 1911. 

fresh meats. Price. 

Mutton — Stewing, per pound 6 

Shoulder, neck trimmed off. (4 pounds 

and over) , per pound 9 

Entire forequarter (not trimmed), 10 

pounds and over, per pound 8 

Leg (8 to 10 pounds) , per pound 17 

Cutlets, per pound 18 

Short cut chops, per pound 20 

Lamb — Stewing, per pound 6 

Entire forequarter, neck trimmed off, 

per pound 9 

Leg (S to S pounds) , per pound 20 

Chops, per pound 24 

Cutlets, per pound 24 

Veal — Stewing, per pound 10 

Shoulder, for roasting (not under 4 

pounds) , per pound 12J 

Chops, shoulder, per pound 16 

Chops, per pound 24 

Loin, for roasting, per pound 24 

Cutlets, per pound 28 

Pork — Loin chops or roast, per pound 20 

Beef — Suet, per pound 2 

Soup, per pound 5 

Stew, per pound 8 

Corned, No. 1, per pound 12 

Coined, No. 2, per pound 10 

Chuck roast (3 pounds and over), per 

pound 12 

Pot roast, per pound 12} 

Rib roast, second cut (not under 3J 

pounds) , per pound 16 

Rib roast, first cut (not under 3 pounds), 

per pound 18 

Sirloin roast, per pound 19 

Rump roast , per pound 19 

Porterhouse roast, per pound 20 

Steak, chuck, per pound 12$ 

Round, per pound 13 

Rib, per pound 18 

Sirloin, per pound 19 

Rump, per pound 19 

Porterhouse (not less than 1} 

pounds) , per pound 20 

Tenderloin (Western), per pound. 24 

MISCELLANEOUS. 

Caviare, Russian, per tin 47, 89 

Livers — Beef, per pound ^ 

Calf, each 60 

Half, each 30 

Steak. Hamburger, pkg 13 

Sausage — Bologna, per pound 10 

Frankfurter, per pound 12 

Lieberwurst, per pound 10 

Devonshire Farm, per pound 17 

Sweetbread — Veal, per pound 1 20 

Beef, per pound 25 

Eggs, fresh, dozen 32 

one-half dozen only 17 

Bluefish, fresh, per pound 14 

Halibut, fresh, per pound IS 

Shads, fresh, each 70 

Oysters, 1 qt. kegs, per keg 50 

POULTRY AND GAME. 

Chickens — Fancy roasting, milk fed, large, each 1 . 35 

Fancy roasting, milk fed, med., each 1.00 
Fancy roasting, corn fed, about 4i 

pounds, each 90 

Fowls, each 60,70,80,90, 1.00 

Ducks, Western, about 4J pounds, each 1.00 

Broilers, milk fed, each 70 

corn fed, each - 60 

Turkeys, per pound t28 

Squabs, each 35 

Capons, each 2.10 

Fryers, corn fed, each 60 

Partridges, each 50 

Grouse, each 50 

CURED AND PICKLED MEATS. 

Ham — German, Westphalia, per pound 36 

Sugar cured, per pound 20 

Sliced, per pound 22 

Half, for boiling, per pound 21 

Boiled, per pound 28 

Hocks, per pound 18 

Todd's Smithfield Virginia, per pound.. 30 

Bacon— Breakfast, whole piece, per pound 23 

Breakfast, sliced, per pound 24 

Pork, salt family, per pound 13 

Ox tongues, each 1 . 00 

Pigs' feet, per pound 9 

Tongues, per pound 18 

Sliced bacon in 1-pound tins, per tin 30 

In 1-pound jars, per jar 30 

DAIRY PRODUCTS. 

Butter — Creamery special, per pound 35 

Cheese — Roquefort, per pound 38 

Philadelphia cream, cake 10 

Philadelphia cream, cake 18 

Young America, per pound 20 

RotIiw. ppr pound 26 

Edam, each 1.00 



Price. 

Neufchatel, cake 6 

Gouda, per pound 34 

Milk (Certified), per bottle **25 

Buttermilk, bottle **15 

Fer-mil-lac. bottle **25 

Ice cream, quart 125 

i-gallon 150 

VEGETABLES AND FRUITS. 

Beets, per pound 

Celery, per head 6 

Cabbage, per pound 4 

Cucumbers, per pound ?6 

Carrots, per pound 3 

Cauliflower, per pound 7 

Egg Plant, per pound 10 

Lettuce, per pound 12 

Onions, per pound 3} 

Peppers, green, per pound 10 

Potatoes, sweet American, per pound 3 

Potatoes, white, per pound 3 

sweet, per pound 

Pears, alligator, each 6 

Parsnips, per pound 4 

Parsley, per pound 10 

Squash, per pound 3 

Turnips, per pound 3 

Tomatoes, per pound 6 

Yams, per pound 3 

Apples, per pound 5 

Cantaloupes, each 10 

Grape Fruit, each 4 

Lemons, dozen 24 

Limes, per 100 80 

Oranges, per dozen 12 

Peaches, pound JO 

Plums, per pound 10 

Pears, per pound 6 

♦Indicates reduction from last list. 
""Indicates 5 cents allowed for return of bottle. 
■("Indicates advanceon last list. 

ISold only from commissaries; no orders taken for 
delivery 

Supplies for the Canal. 

The following steamers, with supplies for the Isth- 
mian Canal Commission, arrrived at the ports of Cris- 
tobal, Colon, and Balboa, during the week ending 
October 28: 

Prim Ei'.el Friedrich, October 22, from New York, 
with 3 cases of hardware, forstock. 

Alralo, October 22, from New York, with 11 cases of 
shipping tags, for stock. 

Sanlcma, October 23, from Baltimore, with 135 bundles 
of valve material, 26 pieces of valve material. 10 cases 
of valve material, 2.692 pieces of steel ties. 2,543 pieces 
of steel bars for Pacific Division: and 92 bundles of 
valve material, 18 nieces of valve material, 37 cases 
of valve miterial. 1.687 pieces of steel ties. 61 bundles 
of railway rack material for Atlantic Division; 4,330 
pieces of steel plates, 214 kegs of rivets, for Panama 
Rnilroad Company; 79S pieces of lumber for Mechan- 
ical Division; 4,500 bundles of splice bars, 300 pieces 
of steel plates, 300 kegs of railroad spikes, 1,110 kegs 
of wire nails, 10 cases of paint and 8 barrels of paint, 
for stock 

Ailsaivald, October 25, from Baltimore, with 16.750 
cases of dynamite, 200 bundles of brooms and 3.000 
bundles of tie plates for stock; 157 pieces of couplers 
and 400 car wheels for Mechanical Division ; 4,583 pieces 
of steel rail for Panama Railroad Company. 

Trebia, October 25, from New York, with 114,320 bags 
of cement for the Atlantic and Pacific Divisions and 
10 cases of benzine for stock. 

Advance, October25, from New York with 5 cases of 
steel plant material for the Mechanical Division; 
8 cases of HU-r plant material and 8 pieces of steel 
channels for tbi Atlantic Division; 13 life preservers, 
25 bundles of scoop shovels, 75 cases of caustic soda, 
13 cases of deck brushes, 13 cases of insulated wire, 
8 bundles of steel wire, 15 cases of stove parts. 9 cases 
of oil pumps. 300 cases of washing powder, 50 crates 
of refrigerators, 14 cases of toe calks. 10 cases of blast- 
ing batteries for stock, and 36 pieces of steel beams for 
the Panama Railroad Company, and a miscellaneous 
cargo, the whole consisting of 673 packages, weighing 
120 tons. 

Parismina, October 26, from New Orleans, with 167 
bundles of packing cases for the Sanitary Department, 
134 pieces of creosoted piling for the Atlantic Division. 
1,000 kegs of white lead, 50 crates of paste, 63 bundles 
of shingles, 25 pieces of piling, 1,215 bales of straw, 
13,536 pieces of lumber and 7 cases of cotters for stock. 

Almirante, October 26. from New York, with 1 .060 pails 
of grease, 9 cases of hose and 800 drums of oil for stock, 
and 6 pieces of steel girders for the Atlantic Division. 

P/ctarfcs, October 27, from San Francisco with 89 pieces 
redwood lumber for the Mechanical Division. 

Found — At Corozal, an open face filled case watch. 
It can be obtained by calling and identifying property 
at House 140, Room 24, Paraiso. • 

There will be a baseball game between picked teams 
from Gorgona and Cristobal on the Lincoln House 
grounds, Colon, Friday morning, November 3, at 10 
o'clock. 



MOVEMENT OF OCEAN VESSELS. 

The following is a list of the sailings of the Panama 
Railroad Steamship Company; of the Royal Mail 
Steam Packet Company; of the Hamburg-American 
Line, and of the United Fruit Company's Line. 

NEW YORK TO CRISTOBAL. 

Allianca P. R. R.. Monday ...Oct. 30 

Colon P. R. R.. Monday.. Nov. 6 

Advance P. R. R.. Saturday. Nov. 11 

Panama P. R. R..Saturday.Nov. 18 

Allianca P. R. R..Friday.. . . Nov. 24 

Colon P. R. R.. Friday... .Dec. 1 

Advance P. R. R.. Thursday. Dec. ' 7 

Panama P. R. R..Thursday.Dec. 14 

Allianca P. R.R.WednesdayDec. 20 

Colon P. R.R.AVednesdayDec. 27 

Advance P. R. R..1 uesday.. Jan. 2 

Panama V. R. R.. Tuesday.. Jan. ■ 9 

Allianca P. R. R .Monday. .Jan. 15 

Colon P. R. R..Monday..Jan. 22 

Advance P. R. R..Saturda> .Jan. 27 

Panama P. R. R..Saturday . Feb. 3 

Allianca P. R. R.. Friday.. . . Feb. 9 

Colon P. R. R.. Friday... .Feb. 16 

Advance P. R. R..Friday... .Feb. 23 

CRISTOBAL TO NEW YORK. 

Panama P. R. R.. Sunday.. .Nov. 5 

Allianca P. R. R..Saturday.Nov. 11 

Colon P. R. R.. Saturday. Nov. 18 

Advance P. R. R. Friday... .Nov. 24 

Panama P. R. R. Friday... .Dec. 1 

Allianca P. R. R..Thnrsday.Dec. 7 

Colon P.R.R.. Wednesday Dec. 13 

Advance P.R.R.AVednesday Dec. 20 

Panama P.R.R.AVednesday Dec. 27 

Allianca P. R. R..Tuesday . .Jan. 2 

Colon P. R. R..Tuesday..Jan. 9 

Advance P. R. R.. Monday. Jan. 15 

Panama P. R. R.. Sunday. ..Jan. 21 

Allianca P. R. R.. Sunday. . .Jan. 28 

Colon P. R. R..Saturday.Feb. 3 

Advance P. R. R..Friday. .. . Feb. 9 

Panama P. R. R.. Friday... .Feb. 16 

Allianca P. R. R..Thursday.Feb. 22 

NEW YORK TO COLON. 

Santa Marta U. F. C. Thursday.. Oct. 26 

Prinz Sigismund H.-A.. . .Friday Oct. 27 

Thames R. M.. . .Saturday . .Oct. 28 

Metapan U. F. C..Thursday...Nov. 2 

Prinz August Wilhelm. . . . H.-A. . . . Saturday . . Nov. 4 

Zacapa U. F. C.Thursday.. .Nov. 9 

Prinz Eitel Friedrich H.-A.. .Friday Nov. 10 

Trent R. M.. .Saturday . . .Nov. 11 

Almirante U: F. C.Thursday. . . Nov. 16 

Prinz Joachim H.-A.. .Saturday. . .Nov. 18 

Santa Marta U. F. C.Thursday.. .Nov. 23 

Prinz Sigismund H.-A Friday Nov. 24 

Oruba R. M . .Saturday. . .Nov. 25 

Metapan U. F. C.Thursday. .. Nov. 30 

Prinz August Wilhelm . . . .H.-A. . . Saturday . . Dec. 2 

Zacapa U. F. C.Thursday. ..Dec. 7 

Prinz Eitel Friedrich H.-A. . . Friday Dec 8 

Magdalena R. M . . Saturday ... Dec. 9 

Almirante U. F. C.Thursday.. ..Dec. 14 

Prinz Joachim H.-A.. .Saturday Dec. 16 

Santa Marta U. F. C.Thursday.. .Dec. 21 

Prinz Sigismund H.-A. . .Friday Dec. 22 

COLON TO NEW YORK. 

Almirante U. F. C.Thursday. .Nov. 2 

Prinz August Wilhelm H.-A Tuesday. . . Nov. 7 

Prinz Sigismund H.-A Saturday . . Nov. 11 

Oruba R. M . . .Tuesday. . .Nov. 14 

Metapan U. F. C.Thursday.. Nov. 16 

Prinz August Wilhelm H.-A. . .Tuesday Nov. 21 

Zacapa U.F. C.Thursday . ..Nov. 23 

Prinz Eitel Friedrich H.-A . .Saturday. . .Nov. 25 

Magdalena R. M . .Tuesday Nov. 28 

Almirante U. F. C.Thursday. . . Nov. 30 

Prinz Joachim H.-A .. .Tuesday Dec. 5 

Santa Marta U. F. C.Thursday. . . Dec. 7 

Prinz Sigismund H.-A. . .Saturday. . .Dec. 9 

Clyde R. M . .Tuesday Dec. 12 

Metapan U. F. C.Thursday. . . Dec. 14 

Prinz August Wilhelm H.-A . .Tuesday Dec. 19 

Zacapa U. F. C.Thursday.. .Dec. 21 

NEW ORLEANS TO COLON. 

Cartago U. F. C.Wednesday.Oct. 25 

Atenas U. F. C.Saturday. ..Oct. 28 

Turrialba U. F. C. Saturday.. Nov. 4 

Heredia U. F. C. . Wednesday. Nov. 4 

Abangarez U. F. C . .Saturday .. Nov. 1 1 

Cartago U. F. C.Wednesday.Nov. IS 

COLON TO NEW ORLEANS. 

Cartago U.F. C. . Thursday. . Nov. 2 

Abangarez U. F. C.Thursday. Nov. 2 

Tivives U. F. C.Thursday.. Nov. 9 

Atenas U. F. C . .Thursday. . Nov. 9 



CANAL 




RECORD 



Volume V. ANCON, CANAL ZONE, WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 8, 1911. No. 11. 



The Canal Record 

Published weekly under the authority and supervision of 
the Isthmian Canal Commission. 



The Canal Record is issued free of charge, one copy 
each, to all employes of the Commission and Panama 
Railroad Company whose names are on the gold roll. 
Extra copies and back numbers can be obtained from the 
news stands of the Panama Railroad Company for five 
cents each. 

Address all Communications 

THE CANAL RECORD. 

Ancon, Canal Zone, 

Isthmus of Panama. 

No communication, either for publication or requesting 
information, wilt receive attention unless signed with the 
full name and address of the writer. 

NOTES OF PROGRESS. 



Switchback Utilization at Gatun 

In order to lift the trains bearing spoil from 
Culebra Cut to the top of the west wing of 
Gaum Dam. a switchback has been built on 
the lower side, from the spillway, running 
beyond the extreme western end of the dam 
on a grade of 1 per cent. Near the far end is a 
switch, on which the trains run back in the 
final climb to the place of dumping. Steam- 
shovel 116 is borrowing material from the 
hills beyond the end of the dam and it ad- 
vances upward on a 1 per cent grade, clearing 
a way for the continuance of the switchback. 
Thus the height of the latter rises as the dam 
goes up, and the switch of the dump track is 
carried steadily further out and up, in order to 
preserve the low grade. This arrangement for 
an easy grade on tracks from a borrow pit 
which by the nature of its location and making 
is at a convenient altitude, is effecting a 
considerable saving of time and expense. 
Trains of 15 dump cars of 10 cubic yards 
capacity are hauled from the borrow pit to the 
top of the dam by a locomotive of the 200 
type; and trains from Culebra Cut, consisting 
of 35 cars of 10 yards each, or 27 cars of 17 
yards capacity, are able, with the assistance 
of a pusher engine, to run intact to all the 
high level dumps, making up to three switch- 
backs to accomplish this purpose. 



Canal Work in October. 

The grand total of Canal excavation to 
Xovembcr 1 was 153,055,640 cubic yards, 
leaving to be excavated 42,267,739 cubic 
yards, or less than one-fourth of the entire 
amount for the completed Canal. 

The total for October was 2,331,678 cubic 
yards, as compared with 2,884,382 cubic yards 
in October, 1910, and 2,827,798 cubic yard 
in October, 1909. 

The dry excavation amounted to 1,516,759 
cubic yards, and was principally by steam 
shovels. The dredges removed 810,215 cubic 
yards, and 4,704 cubic yards were sluiced in 
the Central Division, in addition to the 
amount pumped into Gatun Dam by suction 



dredges. The progress on the locks at Gat un, 
Pedro Miguel, and Miraflores is referred to 
elsewhere in this issue. 

In the Atlantic Division, the total excava- 
tion was 536,431 cubic yards. Of this total, 
66,031 cubic yards were dry excavation, and 
the remainder was removed by the dredges 
in the Atlantic entrance. 

The total excavation in the Central Divi- 
sion was 1,319,187 cubic yards, all of which 
was from the prism. The amount taken from 
Culebra Cut was 1,306,971 cubic yards, as 
compared with 1,320,314 cubic yards in 
October, 1910, the high record for that month. 

In the Pacific Division, the total excavation 
was 476,060 cubic yards, 339,815 cubic yards 
of which were taken out by dredging at the 
Pacific entrance. 

A detailed statement of the excavation, and 
a summary of the work on the locks and 
dams, follow: 

ATLANTIC DIVISION. 



Locality. 


"Work." 
Excava- 
tion. 


"Plant." 
Excava- 
tion. 


Total' 
excava- 
tion. 


Dry excavation — 
Locks, Dam and Spill- 


Cu. Yds. 

112 
65.919 


Cu. Yds. 


Cu. Yds. 
112 




65,919 








Total 


66.031 




66,031 














■170,400 




470,400 


Locks, Dam and Spill- 












Total 


47ii,Jii i 




470 400 
















Total wet and dry 


536.431 




536.431 



CENTRAL DIVISION. 




D*'y excavation— 
Culebra Cut 


1.306.97J 








7.512 
4,704 






Wet excavation — 




1 ' 216 










1.319.187 




1.319,187 



PACIFIC DIVISION. 



Dry excavation — 
Locks, Dams and Spill- 


120.765 


120 765 


Prism, south of Pedro 


15.480 


15.4-1) 













Wet excavation — 


32J.224 


329.224 




10.591 






339,815 j 


... 






Total wet and dry 


476.060 | 


. . . . 1 476.060 



TOTAL 


CANAL EXCAVATION 








1,516,759 




1,516,759 
















Total 


2 331 67S 




2.331. 67s 



Mean rainfall along Canal (eleven stations), 13.52 
inches. 

By "Wmi k" ■ t vat ion is meant excai ation actually 
made for one of the constituent parts of the Canal, 
such as pn locks, etc.; that is, it 

represents mat n from the area to be occupied 

by the Canal and constitutes excavation useful for the 
completed Canal. 

By "Plant" excavation is meant excavation outside 
of any of the constituent parts of the Canal, such as 



prism, diversions, or locks, etc. It includes material 
necessary to be excavated for construction purposes 
only, and is chargeable against the particular plant 
item for which it is performed, such as prism, diversions, 
locks, etc. 

DAM AND LOCK CONSTRUCTION. 



Material. 



Concrete laid in locks. 
Concrete laid in dams 

and spillways 

Fill placed in dams 



Atlantic. 



Cu. Yds. 
53.636 



3,158 
432,625 



Pacific. 



Cu. Yds. 
86.510 



Total. 



Cu. Yds. 

140.146 



3,158 
480,455 



Gate Construction at Pedro Miguel. 

Backfilling of the western wall of Pedro 
Miguel locks has been finished to the lower 
gates and tracks will be laid on the surface 
shortly in order to give the McClintic-Mar- 
shall Construction Company access to the 
lower gates. The company has ordered a new 
erection bridge, which will be placed first over 
the site of the lower guard gates. With its 
present bridge, the company has been erect- 
ing the upper guard gates in both chambers. 
The fill on the west side required about 50,- 
000 cubic yards. On the east side, a steam- 
shove! has been cutting its way up the knoll 
between the locks and the Central Division 
tracks, and will cast material over from it, 
toward the wall, to make the cast backfill. 



Monitors Moving toward Pacific. 

Hydraulic excavation at the Miraflores 
lock pit is proceeding southward, in the di- 
rection of the Pacific entrance channel. A 
hydraulic monitor has been placed in front of 
the barrier of earth which separates the pit 
from the Pacific and will proceed with its 
removal. A new cofferdam is being con- 
structed across the channel, a mile to the south 
but until it is finished a temporary fill across 
the lowest portion of the flats, several hundred 
yards below the place the monitor is to work, 
will prevent flooding. Along the axis of the 
flats is a channel prism, several feet below the 
surrounding area, made by the Central Divi- 
sion in former work, which is inundated at high 
tide. A slight and easily constructed fill 
across this keeps the whole area dry and 
allows the monitors to proceed on the upper 
cofferdam while the new and final one is 
under construction. 



Change in Lighting System. 

The lighting system of the Zone villages of 
Corozal and Diablo was transferred from the 
Balboa power house to that at Miraflores, 
on November 3. The Balboa power station, 
which also supplies all the electric light and 
power for Balboa, East Balboa and Ancon, 
v. .t> running under an overload of about 
twenty per cent. The removal of the (orozal- 
Diablo circuits decreased the load slme fifty 
kilowatts, allowing the plant to run at normal 
icitj and resulting in noticeable improve- 
ment in the lights in all the villages concerned. 
The Balboa plant supplies alternating current 
of 60 cycles, while the Miraflores current is of 



82 



THE CANAL RECORD 



Vol. V., No. 11. 



NOTES OF PROGRESS. 



{Continued.) 



25 cycles, but astheCorozal-Diablo circuits 
are practically for lighting alone the change in 
cycles makes no difference. There are a few 
small motors on the circuits in private use and 
these can be used on the new system. 

The change is in consonance with plans for 
permanent light and power throughout the 
Zone, as the Miraflores plant will be per- 
manent, while it is expected that the Balboa 
plant will be dismantled within two years. 
The Miraflores plant is at present operated 
by the Pacific Division, though the Mechani- 
cal Divison has charge of lighting the villages. 



Gatun Dam Spillway. 

The concrete work in the Spillway of Gatun 
Dam is about 71 per cent completed, 161,155 
cubic yards, out of a total of 225,000, having 
been placed at the close of work on Novem- 
ber 4. A statement of the amount laid each 
working day last week, and of the total in 
place, follows: 



Date. 


Concrete 
Laid. 


Hours 
worked. 


No. 

MiserB. 




160 
88 

135 
SO 


7.30 
5.00 
7.00 
6.00 


1 




1 




1 




1 








160 


7.00 


1 






Total 


623 
160,532 


32.30 


1 


Previously reported . . . 






161,155 





Ancon Crusher. 
A statement of rock crushed at the Ancon 
quarry during the week ending November 4, 
follows: 



Date. 


Hours 
worked. 


Cubic 
Yards. 




7.50 
6.10 
5.30 
7.45 
Holiday. 
7.55 


3.091 




2,437 




2,317 




2,685 








2,871 








35. 10 


13.401 







Porto Bello Crusher. 

A statement of the work done at the Porto 
Bello crusher, by days, for the week ending 
November 4, follows: 



Date. 


Hours 
worked. 


Cubic 
Yards. 




4 20 
5.30 
4.30 
3.15 


1,895 




2.358 




1.901 




1,532 






November 4 . 




4.00 


1,813 


Total .... 


21.35 


9.499 



One Hundred Dollar Tourist Rate. 
Owing to the small amount of travel by 
employes, from the Isthmus to the United 
States during the winter months, and in order 
that the passenger accomodations on Panama 
Railroad Company ships may be utilized as 
much as possible, a rate of $100 for the round 
trip from New York to Cristobal has been 
established. The tickets will be good for 
passage and return on any ships having avail- 
able accomodations between November 1, 
1911 and March 31, 1912. While on the 
Isthmus, touris.s will be maintained at their 
own expense, the arrangement made by other 



lines, that passengers may sleep and eat on 
the ships during their stay in port, not apply- 
ing on the Panama railroad ships. The ships 
will make voyages about every six days, 
according to the schedule published elsewhere 
in this issue, and they will remain in port on 
the Isthmus about five days. 



Visit of Appropriations Committee. 

1 1 is expected that the Appropriations Com- 
mittee of the House of Representatives will 
arrive on the Isthmus about November 16, 
and will remain about one week, during which 
time the Congressmen will inspect the Canal 
work and conduct hearings. 



CONCRETE WORK IN THE LOCKS. 



Over 70 per cent of the concrete for the locks is in place, the amount at the close of 
work on November 4, being 2,952,215 cubic yards, out of atotal of approximately 4,199,400. 
A total of 25,517 cubic yards of concrete was laid in the locks during the week ending 
November 4. 

GATUN LOCKS. 

Over 84 per cent of the concrete for the system of three twin locks at Gatun has been 
laid, the amount in place at the close of work on November 4 being 1,684,721 cubic yards, 
out of a total of 2,000,000. A statement of the amount of concrete placed in the locks each 
working day for the week ending November 4, and of the total, follows; and a similar state- 
ment for the work in the spillway of Gatun Dam is published elsewhere in this issue. The 
construction plant works 12 hours daily, and the auxiliary plant 9 hours. 



Date. 


Construction Plant. 
2-cubic yard mixers. 


Auxiliary Plant. 
2-cubic yard mixers. 


Large 
stone. 






Concrete 
placed . 


Hours 
worked. 


No. of 
mixers 


Concrete 
olaced. 


Hours 
worked. 


No. of 
mixers 




October 30 


Cu. Yds. 
1.408 
1,746 
2,062 
1,572 


27.00 
25.38 
53. 16 
25.56 


5 
6 
6 
6 


Cu. Yds. 
404 
396 
560 
204 


6.00 
5.40 
6.40 
2.40 


2 
2 
2 
2 


Cu. Yds. 
60 

112 
158 
118 


Cu. Yds. 
1.923J 
2,283 
2.827J 
1,926 


October 31 






1,254 


20.20 


4 


252 
200 


3.40 


2 


112 


1,658 


















Total 


8,042 


131.30 


5.4 


2,016 


23.20 


2 


560 


10.618 
1,674.103 




















1,684,721 



*Thc 200 yards shown for the portable mixers are reinforced concrete and were placed on the following days; 
October 30th. 51 J; October 31st, 29; November 1st. 47 J ; November 2nd, 32; November 4th, 40. 

PEDRO MIGUEL LOCKS. 

Concrete work in the locks at Pedro Miguel is over 90 per cent completed, 759,055 cubic 
yards, out of a total of 837,400, bucket measurement, having been placed at the close of work 
on November 4. The record for each of the six 8-hour working days of last week, follows: 







Auxiliary Plant. 






Large 
stone. 




Date. 


2-cubic yard mixers. 


i-cubic yard mixers- 


Total. 




Concrete 
placed . 


Hours 
worked. 


No. of 
mixers 


Concrete 
placed. 


Hours 
worked . 


No. of 

mixers 






Cu. Yds. 
780 
772 
586 
684 


20.50 
21.00 
16 00 
17.00 


3 


Cu. Yds. 
341 


17.75 
14.00 
10.50 
12.75 


3 
3 
2 
3 


Cu. Yds. 


Cu. Yds. 




3 
3 
3 


301 
229 
268 


1,073 
815 
952 








November 4 


806 


20.00 


3 


204 


9.00 


2 




1,010 


Total 


3.628 


94.50 


3 


1,343 


64.00 


2.6 


4.423 


4.971 
754.084 






















4,423 


759.055 

















MIRAFLORES LOCKS. 

Over 37 per cent of the concrete for the system of two twin locks at Miraflores was 
in place on November 4. the total amount on that date being 508,439 cubic yards, bucket 
measurement, out of a total of approximately 1,362,000. The record for each of the six 8-hour 
working days of last week, follows: 





Construction Plant. 
2-cubic yard mixers. 






Auxiliary Plant. 








Date. 


2-cubic yard mixers. 


J-cubic yard mixer. 


Total. 




Concrete 
placed. 


Hours ,No. of 
worked, mixers 


Concrete Hours iNo. ol 
placed. [ worked. [ mixers 


Concrete 
placed. 


1 
Hours No. of 
worked. , mixers 


Large 
stone. 




Oct. 29 


Cu. Yds. 
52 
1,214 
932 

382 

670 

(holiday) 

724 


1.00 
33.33 
35.50 
12.50 
24.00 


1 

7 
7 
7 
7 


Cu.Yds. 






Cu. Yds. 






Cu. Yds. 


Cu. Yds. 
52 


Oct. 30 . . . 
Oct. 31. . . 

Nov. 1 

Nov. 2. . . . 
Nov. 3. 


816 
896 
812 
760 


11.90 

13.80 

11.50 

9.75 


2 

2 
2 
2 


449 
221 

448 
446 


35.75 
15.50 
36.50 
36.25 


5 
2 
5 
5 




2,529 
2.049 
1,642 
1,876 


Nov. 4. . . . 


30.00 


7 


682 


11.00 


2 


374 


26.50 


4 




1,780 


Totals . . 
Previously 


3,974 


136.33 


7 


3,966 


57.95 


2 


1,988 


155.50 


4.02 


3,693 


9,928 
498,511 






















Grand 






3,693 


508,439 



November 8, 1911. 



THE CANAL RECORD 



83 



CULEBRA CUT. 



Present State of Excavation and Future Plans. 

On November 1 there had been excavated 
from Culebra Cut 70,942.244 cubic yards of 
rock and earth, and there yet remained 18,- 
501, 761 cubic yards. The average excavation 
per month during the 12 months just passed 
has been 1,372,000 cubic yards, and at this 
rate the work would be completed by Janu- 
ary 1, 1913. But this rate cannot be main- 
tained, because sections of the Cut at 
either end are nearing completion, and the 
time is approaching when the number of 
shovels now at work (42) will have to be re- 
duced because of lack of room in which to 
work and the output must therefore decrease. 

The Cut will be completed when the 
bottom is at 40 feet above mean sea level and 
300 feet wide. The table shows the average 
depth of the lowest cut at each 5,000 feet in the 
nine miles between Bas Obispo and Pedro 
Miguel, not counting the drainage ditch which 



summit. At the other end, near Pedro Miguel 
locks, there remain to be dug out about 800,- 
000 cubic yards, in the canal and the anchor- 
age basin, but this cannot be done until the 
construction of the north approach and flare 
walls of the locks has advanced farther. 
Between that point and Cucuracha there 
remains about enough digging to keep eight 
shovels busy for six months more. 

By May 1, 1912, the excavation in Culebra 
Cut will be confined practically to the three 
miles between Las Cascadas and Cucaracha. 
On that date there will remain to be excavated 
about 11.000,000 cubic yards. It is expected 
that it will be possible to work 30 steam- 
shovels advantageously in this small section, 
an average of ten to the mile. This number 
will be gradually diminished as the excavation 
nears completion. There is every reason to 
believe that by July 1, 1913, the digging in 
Culebra Cut will be completed, except for 
such small amount of work as will be necessary 
after the steam shovels are taken out of the 



EXECUTIVE ORDERS. 




Entire section equivalent to 0,5*4 cubic yards per lineal foot of Canal Prism. 



CROSS SECTION OF CULEBRA CUT AT CULEBRA 

runs the length of the Cut and is neces- 
sarily lower than the rest of the excavation. 

Elevation 
Station. Near Village. above sea 

level, feet 
39 
39 
39 
SO 
51 
88 
83 
60 
40 
39 



1.480 BasOtvspo. . . 

1.530 Bas Obispo. . . 

1,580 Las Cascadas. 

1.630 Las Cascadas . 

1 .680 Empire 

1.730 Emnire 

1.780 Culebra 

1 .830 Cucuracha 

1.880 Paraiso 

1.930 Pedro Miguel. 



This table is merely suggestive of the con- 
ditions, because the work is done in a series 
of benches, and the lowest cut is only a single 
bench, about 40 feet wide, through the center. 
On the other hand it is typical of the state of 
completion at each mile, because the exca- 
vation proceeds uniformly throughout, witli 
relation to the center line. At Bas Obispo 
and for a mile at that end of the Cut, the 
excavation is completed, except for a small 
amount of cleaning up and the taking out of 
inclines that must remain for the trains hauling 
spoil out of the trench on the north side of the 



WHERE THE TRENCH IS AT ITS GREATEST WIDTH. 

Cut. In this, no account is taken of the 
possibility of dredging of the last 15 feet on 
the summit of the Cut, but it is assumed that 
all the work will be done by steam shovel. 

It is possible that unexpected develop- 
ments in the slides at Culebra and Cucaracha 
will add to the excavation yet to be done, but 
this need not delay the completion appreci- 
ably because if the material continues to move 
into the Canal after the water is let in it can 
be dredged more economically than it could 
be dug out by steamshovel. At Culebra, 
where the banks on both sides are sliding, the 
channel is already 1,580 feet wide at top, and 
the earth is broken so far back on each side 
that the total width from break to break is 
2,000 feet. A cross section of the Cut at this 
point of greatest width is printed herewith. 
The height of the picture is exaggerated in 
comparison with its width, because the 
horizontal scale is to the vertical as four to 
one. 



Amending Section 10 of Act No. 9. entitled "An 
Act to provide Sanitary Rules and Regula- 
tions for the Canal Zone." 

By virtue of the authority vested in me, I 
hereby establish the following order for the 
Canal Zone: 

Article 1. Section 10 of Act No. 9, 
entitled "An act to provide sanitary rules and 
regulations for the Canal Zone, Isthmus of 
Panama, and for the enforcement thereof," 
enacted September 2, 1904, is hereby amended 
so as to read as follow s : 

Section 10. Even," physician, druggist, 
school teacher, clergyman, midwife, nurse, 
head of a family, or other person in attendance 
on or in charge of any one sick or injured, 
having knowledge of the existence in any 
district of the Canal Zone of any of the diseases 
hereinafter named, shall immediately report 
the same to the District Physician or District 
Sanitary Inspector. The diseases required to 
be so reported are: measles, rubella (rotheln), 
scarlet fever, typhus fever, relapsing fever, 
typhoid fever, malarial fever, yellow feveri 
Asiatic cholera, plague, tetanus, antnrax. 
small-pox, chicken-pox, (varicella), diphtheria, 
(croup), tuberculosis (of any organ), glanders, 
epidemic cerebrospinal menigitis, leprosy, 
infectious diseases of the eye. puerperal septi- 
caemia, erysipelas, whooping cough, dysentery. 

Any person who fails to make due report, 
as required by this order, of any of the above 
enumerated diseases shall be deemed guilty 
of a misdemeanor and upon conviction thereof 
shall be punished by a fine not exceeding 
$25.00, or by imprisonment in jail not ex- 
ceeding thirty days, or by both such fine 
and imprisonment in the discretion of the court. 

Article 2. This order shall take effect 
sixty (60) days from and after this date. 



To Prohibit Practise of Medicine, Surgery, Den- 
tistry, Pharmacy. orMidwifery without a License . 

By virtue of the authority vested in me I 
hereby establish the following order for the 
Canal Zone: 

Section 1. It shall be unlawful for any 
person to practise or attempt to practise 
medicine, surgery, dentistry, pharmacy or 
midwifery within the Canal Zone without first 
having obtained a license therefor from the 
Board of Health of the Canal Zone. Any 
person thus offending shall be punished by a 
fine not exceeding Twenty Five Dollars 
(S25.00), or by imprisonment in jail not ex- 
ceeding thirty (30) days, or by both such fine 
and imprisonment in the discretion of the 
court; provided that this order shall not apply 
to commissioned surgeons of the Lnitea States 
Army and Navy, or Marine Hospital Service, 
nor to physicians, surgeons, dentists or phar- 
macists and their assistants and nurses 
employed by the Isthmian Canal Commission, 
nor to nurses acting under the orders of a 
licensed physician. 

Section 2. Any person shall be regarded as 
practising medicine within the meaning of this 
order who shall prescribe for. operate on, or 
in any wise attempt to heal, cure or alleviate, 
or who shall in any wise treat any disease or 
any physical or mental ailment of another; 
provided that nothing in this order shall be 
construed to prohibit gratuitous services in 
case of emergency, or to the administering of 
ordinary household remedies. 

Seccion 3. This order shall take effect 
sixty (60^ days from and after this date. 
The White House. Wm. H. Taft. 

October 14, 1911. 



84 



THE CANAL RECORD 



Vol. V., No. 11. 



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November 8, 1911. 



THE CANAL RECORD 



85 



STEAMSHOVEL DIPPER TRIPS. 

Development of Unlatching Devices from Simple 
Lever to Steam Power Trips. 

An investigation is under way to determine 
the relative efficiency of the -steamshovel 

"trips," operated by steam, known as the 
Geddes and Wichman "trips." These are the 
culmination of a development in the improve- 
ment of tripping devices that began soon afti i 
the first steamshovels were set al work in 
Culebra Cut. 

In the accompanying sketch (t'l the dipper 
of the shovel is shown in dumping position, 
the emptying process being accomplished by 
pulling a latch, by which the door of the 
shovel is held. When the shovel is ready to 
dig, the dipper is near the ground with its 
center back of a vertical line through the 
center of the shipper shaft, as the shaft of the 
big gear is called. In this position the door 
of the dipper closes of its own weight and is 
latched firmly. When the dipper is loaded, 
the spoil within it bears down upon the door 
and tends to hold it so firmly in place that 
the power required to open the latch is often 
so great as to cause a serious strain on the 
craneman, who unlatches the door. Ease in 
opening the door is an advantage both to the 
craneman and in accelerating the work of dig- 
ging. The various improvements on methods 
of unlatching, or of "tripping" the latch, as it 
is called, have in view this dual advantage. 

When the shovels arrived on the Isthmus 
they were equipped with a single lever latch 
operated by a lj-inch rope in the hand of the 
craneman, and attached at its other end to the 
"trip" of the dipper. Several pulls were often 
necessary to open the latch, and almost invari- 
ably a great effort was required. The string 
by which this "trip" was operated passed 
through a sheave on the dipper stick near the 
dipper and thence to the craneman's hand. 

The first improvement was to compound 
this original "trip," and in the drawing here- 
with (A) the compound "trip" is shown. The 
original was the simple lever with the fulcrum 
at (a), the weight at (b) and the power at (c). 




SKETCH A. 

DOOR'OF PIPPER'OF 95 TON STEAM SHOVEL SHOWING 
I iCND LATCH TRIP. 

Height of door 4 ! feet 

Width 5j feet 

In the compound "trip," another fulcrum was 
made at (d) and the power was applied at (e), 
where the line was attached. By this device 
a movement of 20 inches in the line resulted 
in a 1-inch movement of the latch. 

Among improvements upon the compound 
device, one that was given a trial in 1909 was 
the "spring trip" which consisted of the lever, 
shown in the second illustration herewith, (5) 



and a bar passim; through a slot in the latch, 
with a spring attached at its outer end. the 
[rawer for unlatching being supplied by the 
spring. The rope by which the "trip" is 
operated is attached at (b); the fulcrums are 
at (c) and (d); at (a) is a toggle joint; at (e) 




O O : O O 



-y- Latch 



SKETCH B. 

PORTION OF STEAMSHOVEL DIPPER DOOR SHOWING 
ARRANGEMENT OF SPRING LATCH. 

(a) Toggle joint. (6) Powerto break joint, (c) Fulcrum 
of toggle lever, (d) Fulcrum of spring lever, (c) Weight 
of latch. (/) Power of spring. 

the weight; at (/) the power applied by the 
spring. The door is closed by its own weight, 
when in digging position, placing a tension of 
1,300 pounds upon the spring, and drawing 
the toggle joint erect. When the dipper is in 
dumping* position, the craneman pulls the 



wire, 31 coils, 2£-inchcs outside diameter, 
and 21 inches long when free. This del 
worked satisfactorily, but the toggle joint 
required constant renewing, and some diffi- 
eulty was experienced in obtaining suitable 
springs, so that the appliance was finally 
abandoned. 

The first steam power trip was a device 
placed upon his shovel by Thomas Custy, a 
steamshovel engineer, in 1908, but after a few 
month's trial this was discarded. This device 
was improved upon by A. H. Geddes, also a 
steamshovel engineer, until it became practi- 
cable, and a patent has been granted to him. 
It was described at length in The Canal 
Record of May 3, 1911. In this device a 
steam cylinder is located on the dipper stick 
near the dipper, the piston is connected with 
the dipper latch through a chain and a series 
of levers, and when steam is admitted to the 
cylinder the thrust of the piston operates the 
levers and unlatches the door. Steam is 
admitted and exhausted from the cylinder 
through a three-way valve located on the boom 
beside the craneman's seat. A steam pipe 
extends from the valve along the boom oppo- 
site the dipper stick slot, and at the end of 
this pipe, and on the cylinder, are universal 
joints which are connected with one another 
by a flexible hose. After a thorough trial this 
device was adopted, upon the recommenda- 
tion of a committee of two mechanical experts 
and a steamshovel engineer, who reported 
that the capacity of a shovel was increased 100 
cubic yards a day by its use. 

The latest device, that shown in the illu- 
stration, was invented by F. S. Wichman of 




SKETCH C. 

STEAMSHOVEL BOOM, SHOWING DIPPER STICK, DIPPER, 
AND OPERATING GEAR. WITH WICHMAN 
TRIPPING DEVICE. 
A — j-INCH WIRE ROPE. B-WINDING DRUM. C-STEAM 
CYLINDERS. D OPERATING LEVER. 

rope, thereby breaking the toggle joint and 
allowing the spring to exert its pull upon the 
latch, which flies back, permitting the dipper 
to empty. The spring required was of J-inch 



the Mechanical Division. The latch is opened 
by a pull that is made on a i-inch wire rope 
by the outward thrust of the piston of an air 
brake cylinder. The mechanism is fixed upon 
the boom of the shovel. A drum is mounted 
upon the face of the thrusting gear, or shipper 
shaft, which revolves with the shaft, thus 
winding or unwinding the tripper rope, 
according as the dipper shaft moves up or 
down. In this way the rope is kept taut at 
all times. To give the lengthwise pull of the 
cable, a 6-inch diameter steam cylinder is 
mounted below- the drum. This cylinder has 
a push piston, the outer end of which is 
bifurcated to receive a sheave, over which the 
cable passes on its way to the drum. Steam 
is admitted to the cylinder, when it is desired 
to trip the dipper door, through a three-way 
cock, operated by a lever at the craneman's 
seat. When the steam exhausts, the spring in 
the cylinder pulls the piston back into position, 
and the tripping operation may then be 
repeated. This device has undergone a suc- 
cessful test on two 95-ton steamshovels. 



86 



THE CANAL RECORD 



Vol. V., No. 11. 



CONDITIONS AT CAMP OTIS. 



Tenth Infantry, U.S.A., in Crowded Quarters at 
Las Cascadas. 

The Tenth Regiment of Infantry, U. S. A., 
on November 4 completed its first month 
of service on the Isthmus. The temporary 
quarters in Camp E. S. Otis, at Las 
Cascadas, require a great deal of crowding 
of men and officers and the grounds afford 
no space for even company formations; no 
authorization has been made for improve- 
ments and no one in the regiment knows 
whether it is to stay on the Isthmus or is rest-' 
ing over here before making another move. 
It is the expectation, however, that a few 
more quarters will be erected shortly, pre- 
sumably Commission buildings removed from 
the Gatun Lake area. 

One of the new buildings will house the post 
exchange. This is a combined general mer- 
chandise store and clubhouse for the men. 
The necessaries of wearing apparel, and 
sutler's supplies are on sale, under a credit 
system which automatically extends the men's 
spending period over the month. In the same 
building are rooms for reading and for cards, 
billiards and other amusements. 

None of the men are quartered in tents, 
though several of the company messes are 
under canvas. By direction of the War 
Department, the regiment obtains its commis- 
sary supplies from the Commissary Depart- 
ment of the Panama Railroad Company. 
Every morning by nine o'clock the mess 
sergeants give their lists of foodstuffs for a 
day's provisioning to the regimental commis- 
sary, who combines them in a bulk order on 
the Cristobal store, from which they are 
delivered the next morning at 6.45 at the regi- 
mental storehouse. From this point detach- 
ments from the messes take their supplies 
away on their backs or in wheelbarrows, as 
the road chrough the camp is, for the most 
part, at present impassable for wagons. 
Some of the messhalls and tents are three 
quarters of a mile from the storehouse. The 
regulation Army ration costs here 31 cents per 
day. At Fort Sam Houston, where the regi- 
ment was stationed before its embarkation for 
the Canal Zone, the day's ration cost 22J 
cents per man. The cost of the ration is calcu- 
lated from the prices prevailing in the vicinity 
and the mess allowances are made accordingly, 
the company commander spending as much 
extra on the mess as he deems wise, from the 
company fund. On November 4, there were 
810 enlisted men present with the regi- 
ment, and the aggregate monthly expenditure 
on their rations is about $8,500. 

The sick of the regiment are treated at 
Ancon Hospital. The sanitation of the camp 
area is in charge of the regimental sanicary 
department, which also maintains a dispen- 
sary. The camp is well drained and the 
quarters are screened. The health of the 
soldiers has been excellent, the few cases of 
illness being due principally to maldigestion. 
Numerous permits are granted for visiting 
Panama and Colon and the Canal Zone vil- 
lages. The members of the regiment and 
their families are given half-rates on the 
Panama railroad, and avail themselves exten- 
sively of the opportunities of observing the 
Canal construction. At present, on account 
of restricted grounds, there are no formations, 
except squad, in rank. Rolls are called in the 
quarters, the men standing at attention beside 
their bunks. "Fatigue" duty has provided 



exercise, and it is hoped shortly to have target 
practice and service marches. Band concerts 
are given on Monday and Thursday after- 
noons at three o'clock and on Wednesday and 
Saturday evenings at seven-thirty. At these, 
and at any time during the day, the public is 
welcome. Of the thirty-five officers present, 
eighteen have their families with them. 



Examinations for Commissions in Volunteer 
Forces. 

Examinations will be held on November 14 
at 10 a.m. in the Administration Building, 
Ancon. to test the fitness of applicants 
for commissions in the volunteer forces 
of the United States, in accordance with the 
law of January 21, 1903 and the General 
Orders of the War Department, March 25, 
1909. The gist of the law and regulations was 
published in The Canal Record of June 17, 
1911. The examining board will consist of 
Lieut.-Col. Charles F. Mason, Medical Corps, 
Maj. Joseph H. Ford, Medical Corps, Maj. 
Charles Gerhardt, Capt. Ethelbert L. D. 
Breckcnridge, and Capt. James J. Mayes, 
10th Infantry. 

Health Lectures in Three Languages. 

The last in the course of free health lectures 
for the people of Colon, which was instituted 
last May by the Cristobal Woman's Club, 
aided by the Department of Sanitation of the 
Isthmian Canal Commission, was held in the 
conversorium on Tuesday evening, October31. 
The speaker was Dr. J. Tomaselli, of Santa 
Tomas Hospital, Panama, and the lecture was 
in French, the audience of more than 400 
being composed of members of the French 
colony of Colon. Stereopticon views showing 
the progress and development of the tubercu- 
losis bacillus were used. There have been 
seven lectures in the course; four being in 
English, two in Spanish, and this last for the 
French speaking people. The lectures will 
be resumed after the beginning of the new 
year. 

Baseball. 
It has been decided to issue passes to not 
more than 12 men of each team in the Isth- 
mian Baseball League playing at other than 
their home grounds, on condition that the 
League adopt a resolution that no player shall 
be enrolled as a member of any team who has 
not been employed by the Isthmian Canal 
Commission or the Panama railroad for at 
least six months.an exception being authorized 
in the case of enlisted men of the Marine 
battalion stationed on the Isthmus and of the 
10th Infantry. 

Activities of Various Organizations. 

The regular meeting of the Paraiso Woman's 
Club was held in the lodge hall on Wednesday 
afternoon, November 1. Following the busi- 
ness session, there was a discussion on club 
work. A committee has been appointed to 
arrange for the placing of swings in the school 
yard. At the meeting on November 15, there 
will be a program on hygiene and sanitation. 
The membership of the club is increasing. 

At the meeting of the Cristobal Woman's 
Club on Wednesday, November 1, Mr. James 
Ten Broeck Bowles gave a talk on garbage 
disposal. The program was under the home 
department. Miss Alexander, of the division 
of schools, will speak on primary education 
at the meeting under the education committee 
on December 6. 

Hallowe'en entertainments were held last 
week: in Cristobal by the Union church, at 



Gatun by the Sunshine Society, at Las 
Cascadas by the residents for the children of 
the village, at Empire, at Paraiso, where the 
Pacific Dancing Club celebrated by a masquer- 
ade ball, and at Corozal hall, where a pro- 
gram for the children was followed by informal 
dancing. 

I The second monthly meeting of the teachers 
of the Canal Zone public schools was held in 
the Ancon school building on Saturday morn- 
ing, November 2. On the afternoon of the 
same day Mrs. Maurice H. Thatcher gave a 
tea and reception to the teachers. There 
were about 35 present. 

On Friday, November 17, the annual 
bazar of the Ladies' Foreign Missionary 
Society of the Methodist Episcopal Church, 
Panama, will be held at Ancon Hall. A fea- 
ture of this sale will be a large supply of fancy 
articles suitable for Christmas gifts. The hall 
will be open both afternoon and evening. 

A request has been made for magazines for 
the prisoners at the stockade at Mandingo 
River. There are about 120 convicts there at 
work on the road, the larger percentage of 
these being English speaking men. Magazines 
may be sent to the District Quartermaster, 
Empire, designated for the Mandingo River 
Stockade. 

Zone Contribution to Red Cross. 

The following is a copy of a letter received 
from the Secretary of the American National 
Red Cross, acknowledging receipt of check 
for $709.63, the amount raised by the Canal 
Zone Chapter for the Endowment Fund: 
Lieut.-Col. C. A. Devol, 

Chairman, Canal Zone Red Cross Chapter, 
Culebra, C. Z. 
My dear Colonel Devol: 

Your letter of September 9, received this 
morning, enclosing check for $709.63, the 
amount raised in the Canal Zone for the 
Endowment Fund. The Canal Zone Com- 
mittee is one of the first to complete its share. 
Very sincerely yours, 

Chas. L. Magee, Secretary. 

Steamboat Inspection Laws. 

The law providing for the inspection of all 
steam vessels navigating the waters of the 
Canal Zone, promulgated in Executive Order 
No. 1.3S6, dated July 21, 1911, goes into effect 
on Tuesday, November 14. The law was 
published in full in The Canal Record of 
August 16, and the final clause of the order 
provided that it should take effect ninety days 
after such publication. The general purpose 
of the law is to prevent the use of unsea worthy 
vessels, regulate the carrying of passengers, 
and to avoid accidents resulting from failure 
to observe the usual rules in handling ships. 



The ladder dredge Gopher, which has been 
operated by the Pacific Division in the exca- 
vation of sand at Chame, is being overhauled 
at the Balboa shipyards. Its place at Chame 
has been taken temporarily by the Mole, 
which will return to its work in the Pacific 
entrance channel, opposite the shipyards, 
when the Gopher is returned to Chame. 

A train of rock will be sent from Culebra 
Cut to Cristobal every day, there to be dump- 
ed on the mole which is being extended from 
the shore into Limon Bav, as the approach to 
ths system of docks at the Atlantic terminus. 
The ma.erial used up to the present time has 
been from the borrow pit alongside the rail- 
way at Mount Hope. 



November S, 1911. 



THE CANAL RECORD 



87 



Fortification Work. 

The proposed dock for unloading dynamite 
at Mindi, at the junction of the Canal and the 
old French canal, will be built so as to be of 
use in unloading rock and sand for the forti- 
fication work at Toro Point. To accomplish 
this the plans published heretofore will be 
changed so that the deck of the dock will be 
13 feet above sea level, thu* providing for 
unloading by gravity from cars upon the dock 
into barges tied up alongside; a standard 
,e track will be laid along the face of the 
dock as close to the front as possible, and a 
chute will be constructed upon the front of 
the dock, so as to fold against the face when a 
ship ties up there, and so fastened that it may 
follow the fall of the barge in loading. 



COMMISSION CLUBHOUSES. 



Lumber and Piling. 

Orders recently placed for lumber aggre- 
gate about 600,000 board feet. 

The Entiger Lumber Company has been 
awarded contracts for the following materia!: 
42, $75 board feet of vellow pine in pieces 1 
by 12 inches, and 2 by 12 inches, and in 30 
and 35 foot lengLhs. This lumber is to be used 
in making sticks or poles for tamping dyna- 
mite, the sticks to be 1, \\, and \h inches in 
diameter. Four by lour timbers, from 12 to 
26 feet long, 55.000 board feet. Four by six 
timbers, from 12 to 16 feet long, 100,000 
board feet. 

W. R. Grace & Co. have been awarded 
contraccs for the following materials: Spud 
timbers for use on dredges, two 36 by 36 inches 
and 70 feet long; two 24 by 24 inches and 60 
feet long; eight 20 by 20 inches and 70 feec 
long. Creosoted piling for use ir. the founda- 
tion of the wing wall of Mtraflores locks, 750 
lengths, 40 teet long; 25U lengths, 45 feet long; 
500 lengths, 50 feet long; tips oi all to be not 
less than eight inches in diameter. 

Yellow pine or Douglas fir boards: 1 by 10 
inches. 14. 16, and IS foot lengths, 50,000 feet; 
1 by 12 inches. 12 to IS foot lengths, 100,000 
feet; 3 by 12 inches, 16 foot lengths, 50,000 
feet; 4 by 6 inches, 16 to 24 foot lengths, 70,- 
000 feet; 3 by 14 inches, 16 and 20 foot 
lengths, 5,000 ieet; 4 by 12 inches, 22 and 26 
foot lengths, 20,000 feet; 6 by 8 inches, 18 
and 24 foot lengths, 10,000 feet; 8 by 16 
inches, 23 and 30 foot lengths, 130,000 feet. 



Work has been begun looking toward the 
installation at Gamboa. where the construc- 
tion railroad from Culebra Cut joins the re- 
located line of the Panama railroad, of a 24 
lever mechanical interlocking plant, two 
power-operated home signals, to govern the 
movement of trains passing from one system 
of tracks to the other. The relocated line in 
this section will be used by trains from Culebra 
Cut until the excavation north of the summit 
is completed. 

Motor car No. 7. built at Gorgona shops, 
has been placed in service. It will accomo- 
date seven passengers, has a 40 horsepower 
gasoline engine, and is capable of running 
forty miles an hour on level track. It is 
stationed at Culebra, and at present is used 
as an inspection car for visitors wishing to see 
Culebra Cut. 



Married. 

TUDOR-WHEELER— At Cristobal on October JO, 
Anna Elizabeth Wheeler of Brooklyn. N. V.. to Walter 
Pierce Tudor of Empire. Canal Zont_\ the Rev. A. A. 
Nellis officiating. Canat Zone residence. Empire. 

SMITH-HARRIS— At Empire on November 3, 
Ina Clytie Harris to Cart Francis Smith, the Rev. A. A- 
Nellis officiating. 



Activities of the Young Men's Christian Associa- 
tion. 

The standing of the teams in the Isthmian Basket 
Ball League on November 4, was as follows: 

Team. Won. Lost. P.C. 

Cristobal 5 1.000 

Gatun 4 1 . 800 

Gorgona 3 1 . 750 

Culebra 2 3 .400 

Corozal 4 . 000 

Empire 5 .000 

Results of games played on November 4, 1911: 
Cristobal. 27; Empire. 10. Gatun, 22; Culebra. 20. 

Games to be played November 11, 1911. — Cristobal 
at Gorgona; Corozal at Empire. 

COROZAL. 

Over 300 people attended the Hallowe'en Entertain- 
ment at the Clubhouse. Lingo's orchestra furnished 
music for the evening. A vaudeville troupe from Gor- 
gona entertained the audience with songs and two short 
sketches. Mr. King of Miraflores sang three songs. 
M.ssrs. Boyd and Jewens were the prize cake walkers. 
Refreshments consisting of sandwiches, doughnuts, 
coffee, apples and pop corn were served during the 
evening. 

Eighteen men attended the meeting of the Discus 
sion Club on Wednesday night. The subject for discus 
sion at the weekly meetings during November will be 
"Sanitation and Hygiene". 

CULEBRA. 

The results of the bowling games on Saturday night, 
November 4, were as follows: 

Culebra 752 801 864 

Gatun 748 763 801 

The Gatun basket ball team defeated the local team 
on Saturday night by the score of 22 to 1 8. Following is 
the line-up: 

Culebra. Gatun. 

Cushing Huber 

Koperski Wright 

Hepler Mirinoth 

Mitchess Mitchell. J. 

Van Zant Fitzpatric 

Barcroft 

Kenny 

In the local bowling tournament recently finished. 
S. S. Baumer won the first prize and A. T. Sjoblom the 
second prize. 

A billiard tournament will begin as soon as names of 
those desiring to play are received. 

All men interested in the Thanksgiving bowling 
tournament should hand their names to the bowling 
alley manager or leave them at the desk. 

EMPIRE. 

The following high scores were bowled on the alleys 
during the past week: Tenpins — Pinney, 214, 202, 221, 
204; Parkis. 202, 204; Nelson, 210. Duck pins — 
Rodeighiro, 101. 103; Pinney. 113, 121; H. King, 102. 

Empire took three games from the Gorgona team on 
Saturday night November 4. Scores were as follows: 
Empire. Gorgona. 

Gustaveson.. 217 178 167 Arnold 148 124 148 

Spinks 179 158 147 Sims 194 191 107 

Rodeighiro... 192 176 158 Bishop 131 169 140 

Pearson 195 246 234 Burmcster. 125 139 121 

Huson 16S 172 184 Orr 137 136 157 

Total 951 930 890 759 735 673 

Pearson's score of 246 for one game and a total of 675 

pins for three games are the best scores in this year's 

tournament. Empire still holds first place in tenpin 

bowling by again winning the Isthmian tournament. 
The preliminaries in the billiard tournament having 

beenplayed, thestanding isas follows; ClassA, Messrs. 

Wood and Hersh; Class B, Messrs. Zinn and Rossiter; 

Class C, Garrett and Sawtelle. The finals will be played 

at once. 

GORGONA. 

Two hundred and fifty people attended a sociable 
held in the gymnasium on November 1. Hallowe'en 
games were played, stories told, contests engaged in. 
and refreshments were served. 

J. D. Safford delivered an illustrated lecture on 
"Alcohol" on the evening of November 2. 

At bowling la I Saturday night, Gorgona lost three 
games on the local alleys to Empire, the scores being as 
follows : 

Empire. Gorgona. 

Pinney.. 162 204 156 Roper 168 145 138 

Giavelli. 154 177 148 M. Van... 148 141 155 

lei 134 158 174 Sexton 150 136 156 

Davis in i si tig R. Van . 120 157 155 

Parkis... 173 1 7 S 148 Haggerty . 131 155 113 

Total. . 764 895 746 723 734 717 

About 120 people were present at the sunset song 

service last Sunday night. Mrs. R. C. Shady played 



the piano, E. Reinhold the violin and J. T. Hopkins the 
cornet. 

GATUN. 

Gatun won all three games of bowling from Culebra 
on Saturday evening by the following scores: 

Gatun 791 852 743 

Culebra. ... 650 659 684 

The second meeting of the Drop-in Discussion Club 
was held immediately after the band concert on Sunday 
evening. Thirty-two men were present. Among those 
who spoke were Messrs. Windes, Gilkey, Gayer, Dillon, 
Christianson, Hastings, and Brown. The subject was 
''Dangerous and Unsanitary Conditions". The Secre- 
tary acted as leader. 

Gatun won its fourth consecutive victory at basket 
ball on Saturday evening November 4, when it defeated 
the Culebra team by a score of 22 to 20. 

A Spanish class will be organized on Wednesday 
evening November 7. The method will be conversa- 
tional. No books will be required. The teacher is 
Senor Jose Gomez. 

A mid-week boys' Bible class will be organized in the 
near future and placed under the direction of the physi- 
cal director. 

A match game of basket ball was played on Saturday 
evening November 4, between Gorgona's regular team 
and a scrub team from Gatun. The Gatun players were 
Rogers. Taylor, Kenney, Hortenstine and Whiston. 
The score was 41 to 24 in favor of Gorgona. An informal 
reception with singing was held after the game. 

The receipts from the barber shop, pool room, and 
refreshment counter for the month of October were the 
largest in the history of the clubhouse. 

Themembership was increased 26 members during the 
month of October. 

Miss Harris entertained the members on Thursday 
evening November 2, with piano selections. 

Open house was observed on November 3, in honor 
of the independence of Panama. 

CRISTOBAL. 

The last games in the Isthmian Ten Pin League will 
be rolled with the Camp Elliott team on the local alleys 
on Saturday night, November 11. 

In the tournament held on November 3, for the duck 
pin individual championship of Cristobal, twenty-five 
men participated. The winners scored as follows: 
M.A.Smith, 111.81, 109.-301; C. G. Jaques, 93,111, 
84,-288; F. E. Herrington, 95, 103. 84,-282. 

In rolling off the prize for high score between Smith 
and Jaques, Smith won. 

The following high scores were made during the week 
ending November 4, 1911: Duckpins — Orr. E., 103, 
105; Herring, 110; Barrett. 110, 108; Russell, 100; 
Wheeler, 100. 109; Howard. 105. 104. 107. 106, 102; 
Marques. 118; Louch, 105. 102; Abernathy, 102; 
Gibson, 103; Herrington. 103; Jacques. Ill; Smith, 
111, 109; Harrison, 101. Ten Pins— Gibson. 201. 207, 
211.207.201; Collins, 206, 202. 209; Louch, 212, 206, 
221; Buser, 209. 209; Bullard. 226, 202; Henry, 213. 
208; Wallace. 209; Strong. 203. 

Wednesday night. November 1st, 223 people attended 
the motion picture show. The next entertainment in 
this series will be given on Monday November 13. 

The basket ball game between Empire and Cristobal 
on Saturday night was won by the Cristobal team. 

The Bible discussion club on "Social Christianity" 
will hold its next meeting on Monday evening November 
13. from 7.30 to 8.15 o'clock. The topic for discussion 
will be "Unsanitary Occupation." All men are cordially 
invited to this forty-five minutes study. 

A lecture on "Tuberculosis" will be delivered in the 
auditorium on Tuesday evening November 14. at 8.15 
o'clock, by Dr. J. J. McCormick, assistant health officer, 
Panama. No admission fee will be charged and the 
meeting is open to the public. 



Tide Table. 

The following table shows the time of high and low 
tides at Panama for the week ending November 8.191 1 
(75th meridian time): 



Date. 


Low. 


High. 


Low. 


High. 


Low. 


November 9 . . . . 
November 10. . . . 
Novembei 1 1 . 
November 12... 

November 14. . . . 
November IS.. 


A.M. 

12.32 
1.25 
2.27 
3.35 
4.50 


A.M. 
5 (111 
5 45 
6.33 
7 . 25 
8.25 
9.40 
11.00 


A.M. 
1 1 25 
12 ID 
1.00 
1.50 
3.53 
4.05 
5.20 


P.M. 
5 ;n 
6.18 
7.10 
8.05 
<>. 10 
10.25 
11.40 


P.M. 
11.45 



Band Concert. 

A band concert will be given by the Isthmian Canal 
Commission Band at Gorgona. C. Z., on Sunday, No- 
vember 12. 1 9 1 1 . at 6 p. m . 

The next concert will be given at Hotel Tivoli. Ancon, 
November 19. at 7.30 p. m. 



88 



THE CANAL RECORD 



Vol. V., No. 11. 



OFFICIAL CIRCULAR. 



October Rainfall for Three Years. 



MOVEMENT OF OCEAN VESSELS. 



Acting Division Engineer, Atlantic Division. 
Culebra, C. Z., October 30. 1911. 
Circular No. 418: 

EffectiveOctober 31, 1911, and during the absence on 
leave of Lieutenant Colonel Win. L. Sibert. Major 
Chester Harding will be in charge of the Atlantic Divi- 
sion as Acting Division Engineer. 

Geo. W. Goethals, 
Chairman and Chief Engineer. 



Sale of Panama Cafe Building. 

Panama Railroad Company, 
Office of General Superintendent, 

Colon. R. P., October 27, 1911. 
Sealed proposals for trie purchase of building located 
on lot north of Panama passenger station, and known as 
"Panama Railroad Cafe" building, will be received in 
tnis office until 3.00 p. m.. November 20, and then 
opened. 

Bids must be made for the building as it stands on the 
ground, the successful bidder to remove the building 
within tnirty days' time after notified that bid has been 
accepted. 

Proposals snould be accompanied by certified c.ieck. 
Post Office money order, or cpsh, for 5 per cent of the 
amount of bid, which will be returned to unsuccessful 
bidders. 

The successful bidder will be given a freight rote of 
S2.25 per ton in case it is desired to ship the material to 
any point along the line. 

1 9 Envelopes containing bids should be endorsed: "Pro- 
posal for purchase of Panama Railroad Cafe Build- 
ing." and addressed to 

J. A. Smith. 

General Superintendent, 

Panama Railroad Company. 



Supplies for the Canal. 

The following steamers, with supplies for the Isth- 
mian Canal Commission, arrived at the ports of Cris- 
tobal and Colon during the week ending November 4: 

Prinz Joachim, October 29, from New York, with 267 
cases blasting caps, for stock. 

Panama, October 30. from New York, with 72 pack- 
ages locomotive crane parts, 65 kegs bolts, for Atlantic 
Division; 32 kegs bolts, for Pacific Division; 12 crates 
steel plant material, 7 cases electrical material, for 
Mechanical Division; 38 cases drugs and sundries, for 
Sanitary Department; 27.600 pieces building tile, for 
Panama Railroad Company; 12 cases castings, 14 cases 
grindstones, 54 cases salt water soap, 100 cases laundry 
soap. 100 cases toilet soap, 100 cases sapolio, 100 bales 
oakum, 490 barrels engine oil, 105 kegs bolts, 22 cases 
bolts. 14 cases fusees, 10 cases chinaware, 272 bundles 
steel bars and plates, for stock, and a miscellaneous 
cargo, the whole consisting of 29,413 packages, weigh- 
ing 510 tons. 

Venus, October 31. from Jacksonville, with 2,289 
pieces untreated piling.35,121 pieces yellow pine lumber, 
for stock; 395 pieces creosoted piling, for Atlantic 
Division; 271 pieces cypress lumber, for Mechanical 
Division. 

Atenas, November 2, from New Orleans, with 1,629 
pieces yellow pine lumber, for Mechanical Division; 
6,738 pieces yellow pine lumber, 75 sacks cotton seed 
meal, 577 bales straw, 1,272 bales hay, 20 pieces un- 
treated piling. 68 peices creosoted piling, for stock; 
1,348 pieces creosoted ties, for Panama Railroad Com- 



Station. 


1909 


1910 


1911 




bfl 

ca 
U 
V 

> 

< 

a 
o 
*J 
d 

i/3 


hi 
O 



0J 

TO 

V 

> 


CO | 

>» 

■a 

1 


Pacific Section- 

Miraflores .... 
Pedro Miguel . 
Rio Grande. . . 
Central Section- 

Alhajuela 

El Vigia 

San Pablo .... 
Tabernilla. . . . 

Trinidad 

Monte Lirio . . 
Atlantic Sec- 

Gatun 

Brazos Brook . 

Porto Bello. . . 
Nombre de D. 


8.77 
11.20 
17.53 
17.47 
18.52 

17.70 
20.63 
21.14 
16.98 
19.32 
20.93 
18.90 
15.81 
17.02 
16.34 
14.58 
13.38 

15.55 

14.82 

19.31 

8.70 

1 S . 1 V 


8.86 
9.98 
13.40 
13.42 
14.72 

13.51 

17.20 
12.57 
12.90 
15.37 
16.90 
13.33 
16.88 
14.72 
14.53 
16.30 
16.46 

16.02 
12.22 
15.65 
9.54 
5.61 


10.90 
8.47 
9.71 
12.92 
16.65 

17.06 
18.81 
14.97 
12.75 
13.39 
14. 13 
13. 19 
8.63 
10.86 
13.24 
15.56 
18.46 

16.92 
14.56 
16.53 
13.78 
10 12 


10.46 
9.07 
12.37 
13.06 
13.62 

11.60 
14.56 
14.24 
12.77 
13.52 
16.44 
13.11 
14.04 
16.73 
16.60 
14.76 
15.46 

16.91 
14.73 
14.20 
9.82 
1 1 . 30 


15 
13 

4 
4 
7 

23 
6 
7 

29 

13 
4 
8 
5 
5 

18 
4 
4 

7 
6 
42 
4 
3 


17 
15 
21 

18 
22 

25 
25 
25 
24 
24 
22 
20 
24 
26 
27 
26 
30 

25 
29 
25 
24 
26 



Rainfall from October 1 to 31 


, 1911, 


Inclusive. 


Stations. 


c 

i£ 

.5 v 

X c 
n) O 


d 
Q 




Pacific Section 


Ins. 
4.47 
2.58 
2.00 
1.93 
2.34 

2.64 
2.91 
2.15 
1.76 
2.03 
1.78 
1.68 
3.07 
1.86 
2.41 
2.49 
1.94 
6.25 

2.42 
2.23 
2.73 
2.67 
3.50 
2.66 


9 
9 
18 

24 
5 

1 
1 
1 
21 
21 
24 
24 
24 
24 
24 
30 
2.S 
30 

24 
30 
24 
2 
30 
18 


Ins. 
10 90 




8 47 


*Miranores. . 


9 71 


Pedro Miguel 

Rio Grande 

Central Section — 

Culebra. . 

*Camacho 


12.92 
16.65 

17.06 
18.81 




12 75 




12 26 




13 39 


*E1 Vigia. . 


14 13 




13 19 




8.63 




10 86 




13 24 




15.56 




18 46 


Atlantic Section — 


16 92 




14.56 




16.53 


Porto Bello 


13.78 




10. 12 




10.44 



♦Standard rain gage 
Automatic rain gauge 
midnight to midnight. 



— readings at 5 p. m. 
at unstarred stations- 



daily, 
-value 



Stages of the Chafires. 
Maximum heights of the Chagres River for the week 
ending midnight, Saturday. November 4, 1911 
heights are in feet above mean sea level. 



All 



Santa Maria, November 2. from New York, with 36 


Station. 




Vigia. 


d 

3 
p 
'3 

A 

< 


d 
o 

.O 

a 
a 



6* 

2 
o 

m 




Day and Date. 
The following ships arrived at, or departed from 
the Port of Balboa during the week ending November 
4 1911: 


a . 


Arrivals — October 30, Chile, from Guayaquil;October Sun., Oct 29.. . . 
30, Quilpue, from Valparaiso; October 31, City of Para, Mon., Oct. 30. . 
from San Francisco; October 30, Urubamba, from £ues.,Oct. 3 } ■ " 
Callao. Ss Nov 2' 

Departures — October 30. Manavi. to Buenaventura; Fri^Nov 5 
October 30, Ucayali, to Callao; November 1. Ecuador, Sat.. Nov. 4. . . 
to Guayaquil; November 1. Aysen, to Valparaiso; 
November 3. Stanley Dollar, to San Francisco; Novem- Height of low 


127.0 
131.9 
128.0 
127.8 
131.1 
136.4 
128.2 


93.4 
96.9 
94.6 
93.9 
96.2 
99.7 
94.3 


46.4 
50.1 
49.2 
48.9 
49.1 
52.4 
49.3 


17.5 
18.0 
18.3 
18.4 
18.0 
19.4 
19 3 


17.3 
17.0 
17.6 
17.7 
17.6 
17..X 
18.3 


125.0 


92.0 


44.0 







WEATHER CONDITIONS, CANAL ZONE, OCTOBER, 1911. 





Press're (reduc'd 
to mean of 24 
hours.) 


Temperature. 


4» 

> . 

«! 

re 3 

§ 


Precipitation. 


Wind. 


Stations. 


a 

V 

s 


S 

s 
S 
■P 

Bfl 

s 


<u 
O 


a 

9 

a 

a 

s 


■22 




V 

o 

a 


? 

od 

a 

.2 v 
•9 M 

3 a 

1) 


Is 

A 


gal 


al 

« a 
>.- 
£•« 

a. 


2- 
> p 

M.5 

« — 
3 





3 


d 
O 




29.844 
29.837 
29.828 


79.4 
:■•: 9 
80.0 


•'0 
92 
95 


16 
16 

16 


72 
69 
69 


7 
26 
19 


87 
93 
94 


16.53 
17.06 
10.90 


14.20 
11.60 
10.46 


25 
25 
17 


5,386 
3,491 
4,797 


N.W. 
N.W. 
N.W. 


28 
35 
38 


N.E. 

s. 

S.E. 


29 






3 





NEW YORK TO CRISTOBAL. 

Colon P. R. R.. Monday.. Nov. 

Advance P. R. R.. Saturday .Nov. 

Panama P. R. R.. Saturday . Nov. 

Allianca P. R. R..Friday... .Nov. 

Colon P. R. R.. Friday.. . . Dec. 

Advance P. R. R.. Thursday. Dec. 

Panama P. R. R..Thursday.Dec. 

Allianca P. R.R.AVednesdayDec. 

Colon P. R.R.AVednesdayDec. 

Advance P. R. R.. Tuesday. .Jan. 

Panama P. R. R. .Tuesday. . Jan. 

Allianca P. R. R.. Monday. .Jan. 

Colon P. R. R.. Monday.. Jan. 

Advance .... P. R. R. .Saturday . Jan. 

Panama P. R. R..Saturday.Feb. 

Allianca P. R. R.. Friday... .Feb. 

Colon P. R. R..Friday... .Feb. 

Advance P. R. R..Friday... .Feb. 

Panama P. R. R.Thursday.Feb. 

CRISTOBAL TO NEW YORK. 

Allianca P. R. R..Saturday.Nov. 

Colon P. R. R..Saturday.Nov. 

Advance P. R. R. Friday.. . . Nov. 

Panama P. R. R..Friday... .Dec. 

Allianca P. R. R..Thursday.Dec. 

Colon P.R.R.. Wednesday Dec. 

Advance P.R.R.. Wednesday Dec. 

Panama P.R.R.. Wednesday Dec. 

Allianca P. R. R.. Tuesday. Jan. 

Colon P. R. R.. Tuesday. . Jan. 

Advance P. R. R.. Monday. .Jan. 

Panama...- P. R. R.. Sunday. ..Jan. 

Allianca P. R. R. .Sunday.. .Jan. 

Colon P. R. R.. Saturday. Feb. 

Advance P. R. R.. Friday Feb. 

Panama P. R. R..Friday Feb. 

Allianca P. R. R.Thursday.Feb. 

Colon P. R. R.Thursday.Feb. 

NEW YORK TO COLON. 

Metapan U. F. C..Thursday...Nov. 

Prinz August Wilhelm.. . .H.-A. . . .Saturday. .Nov. 

Zacapa U. F. C.Thursday.. .Nov. 

Prinz Eitel Friedrich H.-A. . . Friday Nov. 

Trent R. M.. .Saturday . ..Nov. 

Almirante U. F. C.Thursday. . . Nov. 

Prinz Joachim H.-A. . . Saturday . . . Nov. 

Santa Marta U. F. C.Thursday.. .Nov. 

Prinz Sigismund H.-A. . . . Friday .... Nov. 

Oruba R. M . . Saturday . . .Nov. 

Metapan U. F. C.Thursday.. .Nov. 

Prinz August Wilhelm. . . .H.-A.. .Saturday. . .Dec. 

Zacapa U. F. C.Thursday. ..Dec. 

Prinz Eitel Friedrich H.-A.. .Friday Dec 

Magdalena R. M . . Saturday . . . Dec. 

Almirante U. F. C.Thursday. . . .Dec. 

Prinz Joachim H.-A. . . Saturday. . . . Dec. 

Santa Marta U. F. C.Thursday. . . Dec. 

Prinz Sigismund H.-A. . .Friday . . . .Dec. 

Clyde R. M. . .Saturday . .Dec. 

Metapan U. F. C.Thursday . . Dec. 

Prinz August Wilhelm. . . .H.-A. . ..Saturday. . Dec. 

COLON TO NEW YORK. 

Prinz Sigismund H.-A Saturday . . Nov. 

Oruba R. M . . . Tuesday . . . Nov. 

Metapan U. F. C. . Thursday. . Nov. 

Prinz August Wilhelm. . . .H.-A. . .Tuesday.. . .Nov. 

Zacapa U. F. C.Thursday. . .Nov. 

Prinz Eitel Friedrich H.-A . .Saturday. . .Nov. 

Magdalena R. M . . Tuesday. . . . Nov. 

Almirante U. F. C.Thursday. . . Nov. 

Prinz Joachim H.-A .. .Tuesday.. . .Dec. 

Santa Marta U. F. C.Thursday.. .Dec. 

Prinz Sigismund H.-A. . . Saturday. . . Dec. 

Clyde R. M. .Tuesday Dec. 

Metapan U. F. C.Thursday. . . Dec. 

Prinz August Wilhelm. . . .H.-A . .Tuesday.. . .Dec. 

Zacapa U. F. C.Thursday.. .Dec. 

Prinz Eitel Friedrich H.-A. . . . Saturday . .Dec. 

Thames R. M.. . . Tuesday. . .Dec. 

Prinz Joachim H.-A. . . .Tuesday.. .Jan. 

NEW ORLEANS TO COLON. 

Heredia U. F. C.Saturday . . . Nov. 

Abangarez U. F. C.Wednesday. Nov. 

Parismina U. F. C.Saturday. .. .Nov. 

Cartago U. F. C . Wednesday.Nov. 

Turrialba U. F. C.Saturday. .. .Nov. 

Abangarez U. F. C.Wednesday . Nov. 

COLON TO NEW ORLEANS. 

Tivives U. F. C. .Thursday. . Nov. 

Atenas U.F.C. .Thursday. .Nov. 

Abangarez U. F. C. . Thursday . . Nov. 

Heredia U. F. C.Thursday.. Nov. 

Cartago U. F. C. . Thursday. . Nov. 

Parismina U. F. C. . Thursday. . Nov. 

The Leyland Line steamship Median will sail 
Port Limon and Texas City. on November 19. 



6 

11 
18 
24 

7 

14 

20 

27 

2 

9 

15 

22 

27 

3 

9 

16 

23 

29 

11 

18 

24 

1 

7 

13 

20 

27 

2 

9 

15 

21 

28 

3 

9 

16 

22 

29 

2 

4 

9 

10 

11 

16 

18 

23 

24 

25 

30 

2 

7 

8 

9 

14 

16 

21 

22 

23 

28 

30 

11 

14 

16 

21 

23 

25 

28 

30 

5 

7 

9 

12 

14 

19 

21 

23 

26 

2 

4 
8 

15 
18 
29 

9 
9 

16 
16 
23 
23 
for 



STATEMENT OF 



CONSTRUCTION EXPENDITURES 



TO SEPTEMBER 30, 1911 

(Part II of The Canal Record. November 8, 19110 



STATEMENT OF CONSTRUCTION EXPENDITURES TO SEPTEMBER 30, 1911. 



Table No. 1. 

Includes administrative and general expenses, but does not include general items or expenditures for sanitation, hospitals, or civil government. 





First Quarter. Fiscal Year 1912. 




ro June 30, 1911 




Total to Sept. 30, 1911. 


Items. 


Quantities. 


Unit 
Amount. ' Cost. 


Quantities. 


Amount. 


Unit 
Cost. 


Quantities. 


Unit 
Amount. Cost. 


,-i.tlantic Division — 


Cubic Yards. 

197,65. 

1,001 

1,212.08! 


S14S.390.74 S0.735< 
2.806.55 ) 80fi( 


Cubic Yards. 

>j 1,757, 12e 

28,60 = 

23,972.128 


SI. 184. 637. 5: 

8,864. 7i 

5,647,574.78 


Cubic Yards. 

$0.67421 1,954,77! 

.3099' 29,60" 

.2356: 25,184,2K 


$ 1.330.028.2' 

11.671.3; 

5,961,155. 1( 






3942 




313.580. 3; 


.258' 


'367 


Gatun Spillway — ■ 










1.544,202 

36.96S 

143,747 


1.096.180.5? 

75.779. 8S 
1.149.289.13 

19,831.19 
8,093.23 


.7099! 1,544,202 
2.0499.' 39,18? 
7.99521 158,382 


1,096, ISO. 5? 

82,599.31 
1.256,014.4. 

20.773.4! 

10,958.34 






2,221 
14,635 


6,819.4. 

106,725. 31 

942.29 

2,865.11 


3.070' 
7.292: 


2.1077 
7.9303 








6,482 


.442C 


14,654 


.5523 


21.13C 


.5185 










$117,352.13 






$2,349,174.03 






$2,466,526. lc 




Gatun Dam — 






38,425 
7,453,727 
7.909,615 

40,411 


$20,041.19 

3.041.510.93 

2,095,449.24 

14,719.69 


$0.5216 
.4081 
.2649 
.3642 


38,425 
8.082,646 
8,755.789 

40,411 


1 
$20,041 19 SO 5216 




628,919 
846.174 


$320,210.80 SO 5091 


3,361,721.731 .4159 




311,666.45 


.3683 


2.407.115.69! 2749 




14.719.69 .3642 










' 






$631,877.25 


|) | $5,171,721.05 




1 


$5,803,598.30] 


Gatun Locks — ; 




*S3 337.87 

16,880.31 

26,347.06 

3,347.11 

39,999.64 

18,816.39 

1,424,691.84 

108.280.12 

101,820. 10 

8.772.50 

853.43 


$2.9643 
.0930 

1 . 8601 

.8653 
7.2959 


4.555,395 

488.533 

186.425 

40,117 

8,196 


$3,083,951.58 

92,711.42 

363,241.90 

15,226.73 

18,764.75 


$0.6770 

.1898 

1.9485 

.3796 

2.2895 


4.555,395 

488,533 

195,313 

76,117 

29,700 

21,745 
1,620,212 


S3.080.613. 71 

109.591.73 

389,588.96 

18.573.84 

58,764.39 

18,816.39 

11,688,461.96 

1,089,142.58 

420,688.31 

11,873.75 

853.43 


SO. 6763 






.2243 


15 Preparing foundations, excavation 


8.888 
36.000 

21,504 

21.745 
195.272 


1.9947 
.2440 


17 Preparing foundations, concrete piling. 


1.9786 


18 Preparing foundations, wooden piling, 


.8653 




1,424,940 


10.263,770.12 

980.862.46 

318,868.21 

3,101.25 


7.2029 


7.2142 








255.550 
6,791 


.3984 
1.2918 


539,859 
2,717 


.5906 
1.1414 


795,409 
9,508 


.5289 




1 . 2488 


























$1,746,470.63 






$15,140,498.42 






$16,886,969.05 




Gatun power plant, (permanent) 


21.835 


$13,711.63 


$0.6280 








21.835 


$13,711.63 $0.6280 


Gatun-Mindi Levee — 














177,158 
20,398 


S 68.985. 15 
3,483.32 


$.03894 
.1708 


177.158 
20,398 


$68,985.15 
3,483.32 


$0.3894 










.1708 






















$72,468.47 
S665,382.65 






$72,468.47 
$938 754.34 






128.278 


$273,371.69 


$2.1311 


359,890 


$1.8488 


488,168 


$1.9228 






Total construction cost, Atlantic Division 




$3,244,560.94 






$30,240,321 7H 






$33,484,882.64 




28 Plant and equipment to be absorbed in 










$2,930,450.28 
















Total expenditures, Atlantic Division. . . 








1 


$36,415,332.92 




Central Division — 


4.185,856 


2.444,131.02, $0.5839 



77,338.235 
2,280 


$66,992,606.52 

139,316.41 

9,798.40 
6,224.44 


$0.8662 
61.1037 


81,524,091 
2,280 


69.436,737.54 

139,316.41 
9,798.40 
7,686.22 
3.435.53 


$0.8517 


30 Clearing Canal line, without excava- 


61.1037 














107 
3.260 


1.461.78 
3.435.53 


13.5979 
1.0538 


1 020 


6.1024 


1.127 
3,260 


6.8201 


2,3 Masonry, cement gun facing (sq. yds.) . 


1.0538 










Total construction cost Central Division 


1 S2. 449,028. 33 


11 ' $67,147,945.77 


|| 1 $69,596,974.10 




34 Plant and equipment to be absorbed in 












$557,145.07 


































$70,154,119.17 




Pacific Division — 
35 Dry excavation, prism 


135,060 

1,395,613 

285.987 


S96.812.61 
235,355. 10 
149.981.39 


$0.7168 
.1686 
.5244 


437.943 

28.586,972 

197,677 


$362,161.93 

7.046,255. 17 

129,802.26 


$0.8270 
.2465 
.6566 


573,003 

29,982,585 

483.664 


$458,974.54 

7,281,610.27 

279,783.65 


SO. 8010 
.2429 




.5785 


Pedro Miguel Dam — 










4.074 
260,852 


6,167.28 
126,001.82 


$1.5138 
.4830 


4.074 
304.581 


$6,167.28 
140,812.70 


$1.5138 




43.729 


14.810.88 


$0.3387 


.4623 










$14,810.88 






$132,169.10 






$146.979.98 


Pedro Miguel Locks — 




$769.79 

27,996.16 

352,093.00 

42,706.87 

32,014.53 

8,206.51 


2 . 8094 
6.2850 


\ 

1,035,0801 

121.795 

665,056 


$998,706.11 
346.198.59 

3,590,785.64 
519.401.06 
118.389.54 


$0.9649j 
2.84241 
5.3992| 


1.035,080 
131,760 
721,077 


$999,475.90 $0.9656 




9,965 
56,021 


374,185.75 

3,942,878.64 

562,107.93 

150,404.07 

8,206.51 


2.8399 




5.4680 








55.467 
8.708 


.5772 
.9424 


283,325 


.4179 


338,792 
8,708 


.4439 




.9424 












S46.;.7S(, 86 





I $5,573,471.94 






S6.037.25S. 80 




Miraflores Dam — 


161.098 


$64,780.65 
6,963.53 


$0.4021 


816,499 


$443,947.43! 

22.740.30 

429.51 

19,991.26 


$0.5437 


977,597 


$508,728.08 

29,703.83 

429.51 

19.991.26 


$0.5204 




























14,536! 


1.3753 


14.536 


1.3753 
















$71,744.18 








$558,852.68 




Mirafiores Spillway — 




$1,460.21 












Sl.460.21j 
















1 





♦Denotes credit. 



(2) 



Table 1 — (Continued.) 





First Quarter, Fiscal Year 


1912. 


To June 30, 1911. 


Total to Sept. 30. 1911. 




Quantities. 


Amount. 


Unit 

Cost. 


Quantities. 


Amount. 


Unit 
Cost. 


Quantities. 


Amount. 


Unit 
Cost. 


Mirafiores Locks — 


1 

! 


5.885 
1,597,835 
390,647 
332,703 
201.788 
274,563 


$2,028.98 
1,622.729.54 
142.379.66 
195,299.02 
389.542.77 
1377.270.28 
543.027.96 
127,493.79 


.3448 

1.0156 

.4598 

.5870 

1 . 9305 

5.0162 

.2184 


5,885 
1,877.043 
309.647 
332.703 
209,725 
420,489 

612,749 


S2.028.98 

1.822,027.47 

142.379.66 

195,299.02 


SO. 3448 




279.208 


$199,297.93 


$0.7138 


.9707 

. 4598 










. 5870 




7.937 
145,926 


23,634.84 

696.530.29 

71,280 93 

20,317 35 


2.9778 
4.7732 


413.177 . 61 1.9701 




2,073.800.57 4.9319 




614.308.89 
147,811.14 




58 Backfilling 


28.937 


.7021 


583.812 


.2412 




SI. 011.061. 34 




1 $4,399.772.00 


S5. 410.833. 34 




LaBoca Locks and Dams — (abandoned) 








78,233 


$158,343.29 
315.350.07 
159.306.40 


2.0240 


78.233 


S158.343.29l $2.0240 










315.350 07 ... 

















159.306.40 . . . 
















1 




: 


$632,999,76 






$632.999.76 




















$667, 27 






-. i :. i. 






$58,773.33! 
















Total construction cost. Pacific Division 


$2,045,679.84 




1 


S18. 821,846. 72 




1 S20.867.526.56 1 


63 Plant and equipment to absorbed in 






1 








$2,520,118.04 










1 




















S23 387,644 60 






$18,603.87 





. 


SI4.374.88 






$32,978. 75[ 




















; 


S129.990.075 44 






1 ll ' 











Item 27 — Colon Breakwater. Figures shown include fill from Toro Point and large rock from Porto Bello. 

Item 31 — Dredging F.xcava'ion. Prism. Preliminary surveys. 

Item 33 — Operation of cement gun used in facing walls of Cut. 

Item 36 — Dredging Excavation, Prism. With the accounts for tne month of April the total cost of the dredging plant had been absorbed into the work, hence no abitrary 
for plant is charged in this quarter. 

Item 47 — Mirafiores Dams. Hydraulic Filling. Expenditures represent cost of pipe lines, flumes, etc. 639.098 cubic yards havebeen deposited in dams from dredg- 
ing and hydraulic excavations in lock chamber and in the prism below the locks, the total expenditures therefor being charged to "Excavation". 

Items 59, 60, and 61 — These expenditures were incurred prior to the adoption of the Mirafiores as the site for the lower locks and dams, at the Pacific entrance of the 
canal. 

Items 28. 34, and 63 — Plant. Tne expenditures for plant and equipment are absorbed into construction costs on tne basis of estimated total r st of Plan and th<" 
estimated quantities of work to be done. The amounts shown under ihese items represent the balances which are to be absorbed into construction costs after September 
30. 1911 

General — When excavated material is used i r filling, sucn as dams, back filling, etc.. the cost o f dump'ng only is charged to the items benefited, all other expenses be 
charged to "Excavation". 



DAM CONSTRUCTION. 



Detailed cost per cubic yard for quarter 


ending Sept. 30, 1911: 


Table No. 2. 






















Gatun Dam. 


MlRAFLORES DAM. 


Pedro Miguel Dam. 




July. 


Aug. ' Sept. Total. 


July. 


Aug. 


Sept. 


Total. 


July. 


Aug. 


Sept. 


Total 




201,996 : 


232,426 1 194,497 1 628.919 


54.415 


72.203 


34.480 


161.098 


14.865 


24.812 


4.052 


43.729 










$0.0003 
.0041 
.0571 ■ 

0039 
.1513 
.1284 

0281 


SO. 0046 |$0.0010 SO. 0021 
.0017 i .0196 ! .0081 
0682 ORX1 ! 0708 




























$0.0308 


$0.0181 


$0.0691 


$0.0333 


$0.0599 SO. 0288 


SO. 5082 

1172 

1804 

.0649 

.1300 

.0502 


SO. 0838 




.0057 
.1276 
.1285 
0313 


.0007 .0036 
.1562 1440 
.1290 .1286 
0384 0325 




. 0003 
0349 


.0002 




.0632 1 .0461 
.0678 ' .0564 
.0216 .0213 


.1041 
.0940 
. 0594 
.1800 
.0127 


. 0643 
.0683 
.0295 

.1800 
0100 




0307 




.0161 0272 

.0503 .0150 

1300 .1300 

.0039 .0048 


0370 




.0316 






1017 


0364 .0709 1 .0680 
0198 j .0194 ; .0190 


. 1800 
.0110 


.1800 
.0080 


. 1300 




.0178 


0087 










(0 1927 

.0283 


$0.4238 
0346 


SO. 5233 
0341 


SO. 4767 
.0324 


$0.3744 
0172 


$0 3299 
.0116 


$0.5193 
.0263 


SO i.x54 
.0167 


SO. 2602 $0.2410 


SI. 0509 
.0918 


$0.3226 


^Administrative and general expense 


.0075 


.0089 


.0161 


•M ■» 






$0.5210 1 


$0.4584 SO .5574 SO. 5091 
259,389 | 261.838 846,174 


mi 3916 


$0.3415 


$0.5456 


$0.4021 


$0.2677 


$0.2499 


SI. 1427 


$0.3387 


. 






























Ml t f 

.0080 

.1044 
0111 
0328 
0043 

.0613 
0018 

.0354 
0500 

.0063 


mum 
iiiiiiiiiii 




























































































































Small boats 











































































Total division cost. . 


$0.3157 
.0185 


$0.4020 $0 3326 $0.3474 
.0243 i 0206 .0209 

































$0.3342 


















1 















LOCKS AND SPILLWAYS CONSTRUCTION. 



Table No. 3. 



Detailed cost per cubic yard for quarter ending September 30, 1911: 



Items. 


Gatun Spillway. Gatun Locks. Pedro Miguel Locks. Miraflores Locks. 


July. 


Aug. 


Sept. 


Total. 


July. 


Aug. 


Sept. 


Total. 


July. 


Aug. 


Sept. 


1 
Total. ,, July. 


Aug. 


Sept. 


Total. 


Dry excavation — Quantities — 






















95.464 






279.208 


















































$0 0747 


















































































































.0764 
.0331 










































































.0220 


























\ 1 

























0525 










































































.U-y | .UJ13 ,UZJ3| .U^BO 








































































1 1 












Preparing foundations, excava- 
tion — Quantities — cubic yards. 


903 


742 


576 


2,221 


5,994 1.191 


1,703 


8,888 


6,273] 684 3,008 9,965 


2,4201 2.940 2.577 7.937 








$0. 3009 $0. 4204 $0 2948$0 3157 


£0.2586, 1 


$0.7304:$0.3833 
.2981 1368 


$0.3420 
.4265 






$0. 1043 
.1301 








.2328 .2341 1 0086 1900 0744 1 . . 








$0.1979 SO. 4177 $6.4086 


$6.3259 


.05671 .0722! 


.0479 .16801 
1.2150, .5373 






.1058 
1 0736 








.8956 
.0410 


1.8574 


2 0109 


1.5062 ,7793 ! 2.7753: 1.6571 
0167 3382.; 200? 1383 


53 8444 


1.5619 


1 9883 1 6607 


1 41 JO 


1 6805 




2139 2094 3988 


.08641 1853 
.2384 .3395 


.3906* .2415! .1543 
.0821! .0380! .2791 






.0544 


.1805 


.0650 


.0015 


.0520 


. 0639 


.0202! .4048 


.1850 


1296 


















0927 


.5759 




.13971 .0242 


.0212 


.0405 (1289 




.0218 0211 .0522 


0314 




.2680 


.8150 


.0779 


.4015 
.0883 
.2000 
.1944 






.2173 
. 1190 




1322 

1190 

. 1379 


1125 
.6076 

.38 19 


.4738 
.2000 
. 1789 


1950 1071 


3281 2654 1 70(1 






. 2986 . 2000 


.2000, ' .0006 0002j .0001 

. 1785i .1156 .3303 .1567] .1427 


0600! .0235 0400 0400 




.1314 .2516: .2195 


2309 ,1438 1002 1562 








$1.8702 $3.6947 $3 0974 
.17791 .35001 .3206 


$2.7980 
.2724 


$2.0912 
. 1909 


$5.4321 
.5193 


$3 0154 


S3 7 15') SI 8994 S5 1084 S3 3780X2 5660 


S3 7360 $2 2353 $2 3481 $2 7295 


Admin, and general expense. . 


.26121 .2484' .1901 .4668 .3039j .2434 


.3479 .2028] .2067) .2483 




$2. 0481 '$4. 0447 $3.4180 


.V! 1)7(14 


$2.2821 


$5.9514 


$3. 2766IS2. 9643«2. 0895 


$5 5752 Si 6819 $2 8094 


$4.0839 $2.4381 $2. S548i$2. 9778 


Preparing foundations, concrete 










8,244 


1 
7 700 10 560 


21,504 










1 










































$1 9440 SI S901 


$1 5512 $1.7454 




























.0409 
.0220 


. 0053 
.0155 


.0148 
.0225 


.0232 
.0214 
















































































$2 0069 
.0481 


$1.9199 

.2549 


$1.5885 $1.7905 
.03901 .0696 










































































$2 0551.1 


$2.1748 


$1.6275'$1.8601 
















Preparing foundations filling — 












36,000 


36,000 








1 














































$0.0930 


$0.0930 





















































SO 0'l.iO 


$0.0930 








1 






Preparing foundations, wooden 




1 






8.845 


12.900 


21,745 










































$0. 7339 $0.7462$0. 7412 
.0016 .0075 0051 














































.00971 .0050 


.0069 


















































$0.7452 
.0654 


.7587 
. 1441 


$0.7532 
.1121 








































































$0.8106$0.9028 


SO 8653 


• 








Masonry. 

Concrete — Quantities — cubic yds . 


5,935 


5,050 


3,650 


14,635 


64.199 


59,332 


51,650 


175,181 


16,410 


19.708 


14,740' 50,858 : 32,840 


56,890l 56,013 


145,743 




$1.5698 

1 . 6568 

.6471 

.1824 


$1.5662'$1.6344 

2.0334 1.8485 


$1.5S47 

1 . 8346 

.7382 

.2522 


$1.5563 


S1.5729S1.5648 


$1. 5644 ! $1. 7184 


$1.7491 

7719 
.3995 

.3378 


SI 8285 SI. 7622 $1.8287 
.7626 ,7752 .7905 
.3948, .3982 .3995 


$1.7500 SI 6912 


$1.7451 




1 9915 2 2000 2. 1484 


2.1084 
.9178 

. 1433 


. 7905 

. 3995 

1 .3215 


.7719 
.3995 
.1850 


.7658 
.3966 
.2142 


.7737 




.8037 
.2738 


.7958 
.3358 


.8365 
. 1335 


.9811 
. 1446 


.9461 

. 1541 


.3984 




.3285 


3298 .2984 


.2218 








$4.0561 


$4.6771 


$4.6145 


$4.4097 


$4.5178 
5,370 


$4.8986 
4.416 


$4.8134 
1,634 


$4.7339 
11,420 


$3 . 2299 


$3 2583 


$3 3144 


S3 2654 


$3.3171 


S3. 1064 


S3. 0678 


$3.1390 


Large Rock — Quantities — cubic 








































$0.7806 
69.569 


$1.2564 
63.748 


$1.1203 
53,284 


$1.0132 
186.601 


















Masonry — Quantities — cubic 


5,935 


5,050 


3,650 


14.635 


16,410 


19708 


14,740 


50.858 


32.840 


56,890 


56.013 


145.743 












$4.0561 


$4.6771 


S4.6145 


$4.4097 S4.1690 


$4.5592 
.087C 
.4774 
.1282 
.3632 
.0244 
.096* 
.047C 


$4.6658 
.0344 
.3698 
.1506 
.3725 
.0157 
.0831 
.0751 


$4.4442 
.0620 
.4277 
. 1355 
.3513 
.0158 
.0836 
.0535 


$3.2299 


(3 258 


$3 3144 


S3.2654!|$3.3171 


S3. 1064 


$3.0678|$3.139O 






.0603 
.4265 
. 1302 










.5037 


1.0274 


1.0702 


.8257 


.5399 

.0057 
.5688 
.0597 
.0293 
.0444 


.5315 
.0016 
.5019 


.7801 


.6062 


.4354 
.0586 
.1923 
.0262 
.0175 
.0468 


.3098 
.0413 
.1695 

.0175 
0366 


3413 .3502 




.0136, 0064 
.5890 


11406 .0450 




.4808 
0622 


.7184 
.2295 


.8467 
.0528 


.6540 
. 1176 


.3240 
.0083 
.0719 
.0425 


.1488! .1667 






.0192 
.0291 


0079 0089 




.0204 
.0275 


. 0405 


.0670 
.0235 


.0365 












0259| 0325 


.0339 




0136 
.2238 
.4670 
.0918 


.0399 
.2225 
.3126 
.1392 


.0041 
.2533 
.3960 
. 1560 


.0202 
.2307 
.3960 
. 1242 








.2001 

7110 
.0821 


.1771 

1 . 0644 

. 103: 


.1637 
.8800 
.0874 


.1818 
.880C 
.0909 


.1962 

1.0228 

. 1238 


1646 

1.0189 

. 1099 


.1843] .1805' .2163 

1.0204: 1.0206] .5310 

.1085! .11401 .0916 


.1780 
.5305 
.0631 


. 1294 
.5305 
.0548 


.1679 

.5306 




.0664 






Admin, and general expense.. . 


$5 . 8990 
.3067 


$7. 3666 $7. 3936 $6. 7781 
.52861 .5214 .4368 


$6 2259 
.1983 


S7.12S? 
.227C 


S6.8981 
.1967 


$6.7263ii$5.8205 
| .2076: .3362 


$5 . 6346 $6. 0767,$5 . 8228 li $4.9328 
.2548. .3063: .2959, .2931 


S4.4S27 
.1900 


S4.41 16'S4. 5451 
1979j .2163 




$6.2057 


$7.8952|$7.9150 i $7.2149 


$6.4242 $7.3555 


$7.0948 $6.9339 $6.1567 


$5. 8894l$6. 3830 $6. 1187 $5.2259 


$4.6427l$4.6095l$4.76I4 



Table No. 



-{Continued) 



Items. 


Gatun Spillway. 


Gatun Locks. 


Pedro Miguel Locks. 


MlRAFLORES LOCKS. 


July. Aug. 


Sept. 


Total. 


July. 


Aug. 


Sept. Total. 


July. 


Aug. 


Sept. 


Total. 


July. 


Aug. 


Sept. 


Total. 


Masonry, reinforced — Quanti- 








1.477 


3.180 


4,014 8.671 3,496 


1.028 


639 


S.163 




113 


70 


183 





















$2.2820 
1.9997 

.7548 
1.5547 
5.0664 

.5233 


$2.2500 


S2 . 2040 $2 . 234ol'S? 41 04 


$2.3802 

.7380 

.3737 

.5246 

1 . 2848 


$2.3232 
.7302 
.3694 
.4722 

1 l.'ll! 


$2.3936 

.7495 

.3733 

2848 

1. 1618 




$3.0512 

.7419 

.3761 

1536 

5,4028 


$2. 3306 $2. 7729 










2.3353 1 9788 2 1131 7564 


.7263 

.3720 

.1666 

9.3954 


.7359 










1 0054 .9010 


9144 .3739 

"2X2 : . 1801 

4. 0754 1 .5849 


.3745 




::::::: .:..::: 






1.1060 

3.5433 

.2012 


. 5568 

4. 1322 

.2005 


. 1586 










6.9301 










.2557 
















.0011 
1291 


0015 
.2719 

1.8411 
.0204 
.0633 

1 , 0006 
.2382 


Illl r, 


0017 






.0310 
.3540 

1.0724 
.0521 
. 1074 
.5300 

1.1836 


.0145 












.7727 
1.9732 


. 7264 
.6520 


.6328 
1.3569 


7(1(13 


9490 2S90 

1 4251 1.0036 
.0405, .0091 
.1016 0252 

1 0156 1.0175 
3612 .1711 




.1887 

6J74 
.1904 
.5300 
.5144 


.2519 












1 '034 .6803 


.4102 












.0209 .0097 
.2221 ,1451 
.8800, .8800 


1.0228 
.1166 


.0307 










.0942 
.7110 
.4879 


.0716 
.9585 


.1586 










. 5300 












.3864 .3258 


.3756 


.7704 


























16.2199 

1 7526 


13 2361 13.4318 
1.1013 1 1841 


13.8349 
1 . 2506 


$6.2556 $8. 7383 1 1 .9137 S7 450? 




Il.1665il6.3214 
. 84591 1 . 3550 


13.1383 












.3875 ,5171 .8676 


.4727 


1.0407 



























17.9725 
71.046 


14.3374 14 6159 


15 0855 


S6 6431 S9 2554 12 7813 


$7 9229 
56.021 


12.0124,17 6764 

32,840 57,003| 56.083 


14.1790 


Total Masonry — Quantities — 


5,935 


5,050 


3.650 


14,635 


66.928 57.298 195.272 19,906 20,736 15.379 


145.926 










$6.2057 


$7.8952 $8 2257 S7.2925 1 


$6 6643 


$7 6876 $7 6217 S7 2959 $6. 2421 S6. 0563 S6 6489 


$6,2850S5 2259 $4 6573 S4. 6258 


$4 7732 


Back filling — Quantities — cubic 


770 


1 5,712 


6.482 


62,641 


78,650 114,259 


255,550 


13,707| 18.786 


22,974 


55,467 


340 


6.117 


22.480 , 28.937 
















SO. 0047 SO 0034 


$0.0030 
.0088 
0150 






















SO. 0034 

.0194 

1358 


.0165 
0196 

.1332 
0388 


.0065 
0095 
















SO 0499 
.2488 




SO. 0058 
.2350 












.:::::: 




SO. 1152 


. 0X40 


1 1 1 9 SO 1 749 SO . 0835 SO 1 1 38 


$6.1186 
.0783 
.1685 
.0371 
. 1100 
.0250 


$4 9329 
6.6555 

.1100 

3.X42 


$6.3570 
.0276 


$0 (H,JX SO. 1822 




.0977 


.0665 0361 


.0361 
.0616 
.0222 

0192 
.0156 


.0370 .1224 
.0953' .2112 


0700 .0587 
.1587 .1509 
.0327| .0346 
.1100 ,1100 
.0230| .0192 


.1008 .0841 






.0548 
0117 


.0834 145l! 1048 


.1707] .1324 .2172 




.0400 


0151 


.0834 0183 
.02541 .0649 
0240 0262 


.0360 
.0348 
.0209 


.0472 
.1100 
.0376 


.0069 J .0495 

1100 .1100 

.0328 .0161 


.0399 
.1100 




.0307 0177 


.0278 


.0240 










$0.4671 $0.2616 

.04971 i .0259 


$0. 3985 J$0. 4726 

.0435 .0509 


$0.4270 $0.2581 
.0414 .0236 


$0.3627 
.0357 


$0.7033 
.0571 


$0.4779 $0.4872 
.0318 .0358 


$0.5375 
.0397 


112.0826 
.7982 


$0.7050 SO. 4716 
.0529 .0312 


$0.6574 


Admin, and general expense. . . 


.0447 




SO. 5168 $0.2875 


SO. 442ol ($0.5235 


SO. 4684 SO. 28 17 SO, 3984 


$0 7604 


$0.5097 $0.5230 


$0.5772 


1 ! 8808 mi 7579l$0.5028 


$0.7021 


Filling center wall — Quantities 










400 


200 6,191 6.791 


998 


.3,302 


4,408 8.708 






















































$0.0271 




SO 0016 
0355 






$0.1555 $0.0787 
.0166 .0198 
.3773 .5692 
0082 0081 




















$0 0389 




$0.0300 
.9183 
.0106 
0406 
















3.6623 


SI 5948 


7137[ 9133 SO 2618 









































.0081. .0073 
.21701 .2170 
.0409 .0480 


. 1100 


0709 


.0513 
.1164 
.0384 
















::::::: 




.6S10 
.0586 


.1187 .1161 
.0502 .0381 


::.:::: . 
















.1521 
































$3.8415 
.2074 


$2. 3044 S1.0186S1. 2227 
.0808] .0597| .0691 


$0.3718 


$1. 1684 SO. 7827ISO. 8819 
.01,75' .06901 .0605 


1 






































Totat cost 1 








||$4.0489 


$2.3852 Sl.0783lSl.2918 


SO. 3718 


SI 2359 SO. 8517 SO. 9424 










DRY EXCAVATION— PRISM. 



Detailed cost per cubic yard for quarter ending September 30, 191 1 


Table No. 4. 


















Atlantic Division. 




Central Division. 






Pacific Division. 






July. 


Aug. 


I 
Sept. | Total. 


July. 


Aug. 


Sept. 


Total. 


July. 


Aug. 


Sept. 


Total. 


Dry excavation — Quantities — cubic yards 


58,125 


65,041 


74,487 197,653 


1,337,833 


1.442.402 


1.340,173 


4,120,408 


43,799 


54,164 


37,097 


135.060 




Ml II MS 

. 1225 
.0791 
.0966 


$0.0341 
.0779 
.0453 
0707 


$0.0041 $0.0257 
.0421 0775 
.0444 0549 
.0841 (1X34 
. 1268 


$0.0556 
0656 
.0496 
.0858 
0740 
0460 
0044 
(1X14 
0500 
0155 


$0.0625 
.0682 
.0458 
.0906 
0717 
0525 
.0049 
0831 
.0500 
.0167 


$0.0533 
.0696 
.0539 
, 1323 
.0610 

0447 
.0037 

0844 
.0500 
.0154 


SO. 0573 
1107 X 
.0497 
, 1026 
.0690 
1117') 
nii4i 

(IXJ'I 

.0500 
.0159 


SO 0542 
(1343 
1248 
.1482 
.0830 
2 2 f. 
.0224 
.0489 
. 1300 
.0288 


$0.0311 
.0184 
. 1014 
. KI72 
.0657 
.0196 
.0212 
.0659 
. 1303 
.0232 


$0.0365 
.0128 
.2112 
.1355 
.0593 
.0260 
.0367 
.0891 
.1301 
.0279 


$0 . 0400 




.0221 




.1392 




. 1283 




.1410 1337 


.0695 












.0223 






.0115 
.1330 
.2724 
.0238 


.0204 
.0426 
.2000 
.0175 


.0115 
.0817 
.2000 
.0214 


.0258 




.0744 
.1190 
.0238 


.0668 




.1301 




.0263 








mi run: 
.0615 


$0.8024 
.0476 


$0 5820 
.0332 


(0 6893 

0463 


SO. 5279 
,0437 


$0.5460 
.0369 


SO. 5683 
0405 


S0.S474 
.0403 


0.6972 
.0502 


$0.5840 
0364 


$0.7651 
.0562 


$0.6704 
.0464 




so :m: 


$0 8500 




to . 156 


SO 5716 


SO. 5829 


SO. 6088 


SO, 5877 


7474 


$0 6204 


$0.8213 


$0.7168 


Dry excavation — Prism, by contract — 










22.2X4 


21.892 


21.272 


65.448 
















< 














SO 2888 
0500 


$0.3048 
.0500 


$0 3007 
. 0500 


$0 2980 




1 












































SO 3388 


I0.3S48 


SO 3507 


Mi 34X0 












Total dry excavation — Quantites — cubic 


58.125 65,041 


74.487 197.653 


1.360.117 


1.464.294 


1.361.445 


4.185.856 


43.799 


54.164 


37,097 


135,060 








$0.7617 $0.8500 


$0 6152 $0.7356 


$0.5678 


SO 5795 


$0.6048 


SO 5839 


$0.7474 


$0.6204 


$0.8213 


$0.7168 



DREDGING EXCAVATION— PRISM. 

Detailed cost per cubic yard for quarter ending Sept. 30. 1911: 



Table No. 5. 



Atlantic Division. 



Pacific Division.* 



July. 



August. 



September. 



July. 



Quan 

tities. 

cu. yds. 



Quan- 
Unit tities. 
cost cu. yds. 



Quan- 
Unit tities. Unit 
cost. cu. yds. cost. 



Quan- 
tities, 
cu. yds. 



Quan- 
Unit tities. 
cost. cu. yds. 



Unit 
cost. 



August. 



September. 



Quan- ; Quan- 

tities, Unit ] tities, 
tu. yds. cost. cu. yds. 



Total. 



Unit 
cost. 



Quan- 
tities, 
cu. yds. 



Unit 
cost. 



Pipe lines 

Dykes 

Clearing 

Op'n, seagoing suction dredge 
R'p'rs, seagoingsuction d redge 
Operation, ladder dredges. . 
Repairs, ladder dredges .... 
Operation, dipper dredges. . 
Repairs, dipper dredges. . . . 
Operation, pipe line dredges. 
Repairs, pipe line dredges.. . 
Op'n. tugs, clapets and scows 
R'p'rs. tugs, clapets, and scows 

Drilling 

Blisting 

Operation, drill barges 

Operation, rock breakers. . . 

Small boats 

Repairs, misc. equipment. . . 

Plant arbitrary 

Division expense 



' 



298,778 
298,778 
88.300 
88.300 
37.117 
37,117 



SO. 0399 265,542 SO. 0384 
.00241265,542 .0051 
.0825 61.212 0907 
.2098 61.212 1393 
.1329 411.7(12 .1131 
.4367 40.702 .3132 



420.434 $0, 
293.621 
.W.l, 21 

66.304 

66.304 

60.509 

60,509 



nolo 

0312 
0026 
0638 
1218 
1140 
1094 



,212,085 SO. 0006; 
857,9411 .0365!; 189.565 



857,941 
215,816 
215.816 
138,328 
138,328 



0(133 
.0791 
. 1627 
. 1188 

.2572 



1S9.565 

181.355 

181,355 

80.000 

80,000 



$0.0600 
.0147 
.0501 



212,002 
212.002 
225,884 
0112!l225,884 
0519' 42,429 
0418 42.429 



$0. 0544| 259,755 
.0220!' 259.755 
.0488 1X5.775 
.0134:185,775 
.07901 18,848 
.0780 18,848 



$0.0381 
. 0087! 
.0514, 
. 0303| 
.24011 
.0492 



661,322 $0.0497 
661,322 .0147 



593,014 
593,014 
141,277 
141,277 



125,417 

125,417 

24.725 

24.725 



.0822 101,914 
.0394, 101.914 
. 1 129' 43.300 1 
.2634j ] 43,300 



424,195 
424,195 
424.195 
424.195 



002h 367.456 

.0031 367.456 

.0610 367,456 

.0074 367.456 



Total division cost 

Admin, and general expense 



Total cost 



Earth excavation — per cent . . 
Rock excavation — per cent . . 



424.195 
424.195 



$0.2744., 367.456 
.0236,367.456 



$0.2980 367.456 



399.470 
>24,725 



94.17 324.156 
5.83 43.300 



0912 
.0492 
.08001! 

1605I 1 



126,813 
126.813 

39,540! 

39.540! 



0625 

.0347 

1062 

1(,86 



0039 
0004 
0265 
0087 



420,434 
420,434 
420,434 
420.434 



.0039 
0037 
0450 
0067 



SO 2228 420,434 $0.2079 
.0292 [420.434: .0170 



$0.2520,1420.434 $0. 2249 



88 22 580.894 
11.7811 39.540 



90.60 
9 40 



354.154 .0778 261.355 
354,154 .0406 261,355 
107,565 .0972 5,675 
107,565 .1871 5,675 

! 5,675 

5,675 

212,085 0024 450,920 

,212,085 .0025! 450.920 

1,212.085| .0450 450.920 

1,212.085, .0075450.920 



. |. 



.0576 268.313, 
.0150' 268,313 

I 13,425 

.27321 13,425 

2.1615" 13,425 
,2382l| 13.425 
.0025 480.315 
.0038 480,315 

;! 480.315 

(1055 480,315 



.0638 204,623 
.0195 204,623 

21.187 

21.187 

.7558! 21,187 
.0849 21,187 
.0028, 464,378 
.0045' 464,378 

||464.378 

.0060 464,378 



. 0663' 
.0223 



.4788 
.0497 
. 0020 
.0029, 

. 0042 



734.291 

734,291 

40.287 

40,287 

40,287 

40,287 

1,395,613 

1,395,613 

1.395,613 

1.395,613 



j l,212,085!$O,2357 450,920!$0. 1602 480,315 SO. 1601 1 464,378 $0. 14291 1,395.613 
I 1.212.085 . 0230 ! 450.9201 .0157!, 480.315 .0137 464.378 .0133 1.395.613 



1.212.085 $0.2587 



1.104,520 
107.565 



91. 13 
8,87 



450.920!$0. 1759i!480.315 $0, 1738 



445, 245 98. 7411466.890 97.20 
5,675 1.26 13,425 2.80 



464.378 $0. 1562|i 1.395,613 



443,191 
21.187 



95.44! 1,355,326 
4.5611 40.287 



.0500 
.0180 
.0852 
.0563 



.0623 
.0187 



.0385 
.8081 
.0880 
.0024 
.0038 

^0052 



$0.1544 
.0142 



$0.1686 



97.11 
2 89 



NOTE — *The total cost of the Dredging Plant had been absorbed at the close of April, hence no charge appears for this quarter. 



STONE PRODUCTION. 



Detailed cost per cubic yard for quarter ending September 30. 1911: 



Table No. 6. 





Porto Bello Quarry. 




Ancon Quarry. 






July. 


Aug. 


Sept 


Total. 


July. 


Aug. 


Sept. 


Total. 




43.352 


41,826 


44.352 


129,530 


61,362 


58.962 


63,426 


*185 121 








$0.0079 
.0587 
.1181 
. 1018 
0814 
.0400 
.0274 
.0417 
.3300 


$0.0216 
.0636 
.2744 
.0923 
0851 
0334 
.0398 
.0799 
.5072 


$0.0106 
.0465 
.2142 
.0833 
.0793 
.0198 
.0409 
0756 
.4170 


$0.0132 
.0561 
.2015 
.0924 
.0819 
.0309 
.0360 
.0657 
.4170 


$0.0217 
.0473 
.0508 
.0389 
.0565 
.0229 


$0.0309 
.0572 
.0340 
.0382 
.0580 
.0163 


$0.0226 
.0527 
.0449 
.0382 
.0476 
.0222 


$0.0248 




.0520 




.0430 




.0382 




.0534 




.0204 








.0327 
.2400 


.0452 
.2400 


.0396 
.2400 


.0388 




.2400 








SO 8070 


SI 1973 


$0.9872 


80 9947 


$0.5108 


$0.5198 


$0.5078 


$0.5106 




43,352 


41,826 


44,352 


129.530 


61 362 


58,962 


63,426 


185 121 








$0.0644 

.0468 

.0509 

.1702 

1700 


$0.0331 
.0168 
.0512 
.1303 
.2616 


$0.0266 
.0120 
.0525 
.0769 
.2150 


$0.0413 
.0253 
.0515 
.1254 
.21S0 


$0.0184 
.0042 
.0183 
.0773 
.0739 


$0.0209 
.0047 
.0172 
.0175 
.0742 


10.0155 

.0038 
.0166 
.0265 
.0740 


$0.0180 




.0042 




.0173 




.0403 




.0740 






Total 


$0.5023 


$0.4930 


$0.3830 


$0.4585 


$0.1921 


$0.1345 


$0.1364 


SO. 1538 








SI 3093 


SI 6903 


$1 . 3702 


$1.4532 


$0.7029 


SO 6543 


$0.6442 


$0.6644 




43,352 


41,826 


44,352 


129,530 




1 










$0.1645 

.0844 

1710 


SO. 1843 
. 1480 

.2748 


$0.1662 
.0690 
.2220 


$0.1715 
.0996 
.2220 






























SO 4199 


SO. 6071 


$0.4572 




1 




43.352 


41,826 


44,352 


129,530 






















$0. 1270 
.0249 
.0628 
.2070 


SO. 1148 
.0218 
.1038 
.3312 


$0.0957 
.0182 
.0429 
.2680 


$0.1123 
.0217 
0692 
2680 






* 












::::::::::::::::::.: 












SO 42 1 7 


$0.5716 


SO. 4248 


$0 4712 








17,292 


18,950 


1 17.730 


53,972 


61,362 


58,962 


63,426 


185,121 




$0.1093 
.0045 


$0.0954 
.0055 


$0. 1017 
.0083 


S0.101S 
.0061 


$0.0422 
.0024 
.0098 
.0124 
.0700 


$0.0402 
.0033 
.0090 
.0161 
0700 


$0.0380 


SO. 0398 




.0019 




0084 
.0190 
.0700 


.0090 




.067C 


.0768 


.0669 


.0704 


.0157 




.0700 
















$0. 180! 


$0 1777 


$0.1769 


SO 17.84 


|| $0.1368 


SO 1386 


$0.1354 


$0.1364 




$0.040« 


$0.0438 


$0.032 J 


$0.0385 


j| $0.020c 


$0.019S 


$0.0141 


$0.0180 








$2.263( 


$2.9934 


I $2.3554 


$2.530< 


1 $0.8603 


$0.8128 


$0.7937 


$0.8188 



•NOTE — Under "Total Quantities" 1.371 cubic yards have been added, to adjust the difference between cross section measurements of stock pile and book 
balance. This amount was not added to monthly quantities. 



SAND PRODUCTION. 



Detailed cost per cubic yard for quarter ending Sept. 30, 1911: 



Table No. 7. 



Items 



NOMBRE DE DlOS. 



CHAMK. 



July. 



Aug. 



Sept. 



Total. 



July. 



Aug. 



Sept. 



Total. 



Dredging— Quantities — cubic yards . 



Operation, dredges 

Maintenance of equipment 



Total 

Plant arbitrary. 



Total cost of production. . . 
Towing — Quantities — -cubic yards. 



Operation, tugs and barges . 
Maintenance of equipment . 
Plant arbitrary' 



Total 

JnloadinR — Quantities — cubic yards 



Operation, cableways and cranes . 
Power. 



Maintenance of equipment . 
Plant arbitrary' 



Total 

Rail Transportation to Storage — Quantities — cubic yards 

Operation of trains 

Repairs to tracks 

Dumping in storage 

Maintenance of equipment 

Plant arbitrary 



Total . 



Division expense 

Total lost in storage . 



*Indicatesciedit. 



27,818 



$0.2753 
.0295* 



$0.2458 



Ml 1X110 



SO. 2058 
.0113 



$0.2171 



$1.0613 



$0 72SX 
24,512 



$1 2784 

iTSis 



32,401 



SO. 1769 
.0524 



$0.2293 



$0.7890 



SI. 0183 



$0.2149 

.0152 



$0.2301 



$0.1294 
.0454 



$0.1748 



41,029 



39.863 



$0.0852 
.0972 



SO. 0960 
. 0403 



$0.1824 



$0.1363 



$0.7890 $0.0300 $0.0300 



SI 0191 



$0 0300 



32,401 



84.731 



SO .2048 

33/114 



I $0.2124 



SO. 1663 



$0.2297 
.0838 
.2110 



t0. 5245 

24,512 



$0.2244 
.1630 
.3446 



SO. 2240 
.1251 
.2820 



SO. 2257 
. 1257 
.2820 



$0.1289 
.0692 
.0600 



$0 7320 
27.818 



$0.6311 

32.401 



SO. 1123 

te|.0153 

» .0605 

. 1620 



si) 5501 



$0. 1185 
. 0235 
.1104 
.2654 



$0.5178 



$0.0961 
.0217 
.0472 
.2170 



$0.3820 



tO .6334 

84,731 



SO. 1081 
.0205 
0718 
.2170 



SO. 4174 



11.553 



13.432 



SO. 1093 
.0045 



SO. 0954 
.0055 



.0768 



$0.1808 $0.1777 



$0.0122 : $0.0115 



$1.6977 $2.6255 



11,743 



t0. 2278 

33.014 



$0.1017 
.0083 



.0669 



$0.1769 



$0.0085 



S2.1040 



$0.1018 
.0060 



$0.0550 
. 0630 
.0179 
.0167 
.0900 



$0.0463 

, 02 73 

.0132 

! .0192 

0900 



$0 0432 
0384 

.0125 
0220 

.0900 



SO. 1784 $0.2426 SO 1960 $0.2061 



SO. 0105 SO. 0191 SO. 0134 ! SO 0116 



$2.1577 



$0.9524 



SO. 8384 



$0.8229 



HYDRAULIC EXCAVATION-PRISM. 



Table No. 8. 



$0. 1020 
.0621 



S01641 



SO. 0300 



$0 1941 
114.806 




1 14,806 



SO. 0479 

(1417 
(1143 
0194 
. 0900 



SO. 2133 



SO. (II 44 



SO. 8667 



Items. 



Atlantic Division. 



July. 



Aug. 



Sept. 



Total. 



July. 



Pacific Division. 
Aug. Sept. 



Total. 



Quantities — cubic yards. 



Drilling 

Blasting 

Pumping station 

Pipe lines and monitors. . . . 

Dredging pumps 

Relay pumps 

Dykes 

Maintenance of equipment . 

Power 

Plant arbitrary 

Division expense 



1.000 



69,772 



149.926 



66.289 



S2.4430 



$2 . 4430 



SO. 0792 
.0629 
.0622 



SO 0229 

0394 

SO 0490 .0902 

.0573, .0706 

.0125 0623 



285.987 



S.0053 
.0092 
. 0659 
.0618 
.0361 



Total division cost 

Administrative and general expense. 



1546 



1546 



(1886 
.1421 
.1001 
.0141 



.0096 
.0612 
.0794 
.0966 
.0081 



0939 
1000 

.1317 
.1012 
.0162 



$2.5976 
.2090 



fotal cost . 



$2 . 8066 



$2.5976 
.2090 



sn svi: 

. 0307 



$2.8066 



$0 5799 



SO. 3737 
.0160 



SO. 7284 
0425 



.0268 
.0769 
1 068 
. 0985 
.0114 



t0 4')87 
.0257 



SO. 3897 SO. 7709 ( $0.5244 



MANUFACTURING CONCRETE PILES. 



Table No. 9. 



Atlantic Division. 



July. 



August. September. Total. 



Quantities— lineal feet . 



"" 



1.500 



750 



10.455 



12.705 



Cement so 0860 

Stone ,0671 

Sand .0178 

Mixing .0511 

Placing .0744 

Reinforcements 1 .0581 

Forms . 2320 

Maintenance of equipment .0410 

Plant arbitrary . 1700 

Division expense . 0624 



$0.0960 
.0820 

009.' 
. 2083 
. 134X 
.7729 
.1292 

0158 
.2030 
.0502 



$0.0799 
.0679 
0085 
.0789 
.0436 
.6990 
.0829 
. 0005 
. 1810 
.0207 



$0.0816 
. 0686 
.0097 
.0832 
.0527 
.7457 
.1032 
.0062 
.1810 
.0274 



Total cost i SI. 8599 $1.7014 SI. 2629 



SI. 3593 



COLON BREAKWATER. 



Table No. 10. 



Items. 



Toro Point Fill. 

Excavation — Quantities — Cubic yards. 



Surveys 

Clearing 

Drilling 

Blasting 

Loading by power 

Tracks 

Transportation 

Maintenance of equipment. 



Total . 



Filling — Quantities — Cubic yards . 



Trestles 

Dumping 

Maintenance of equipment . 



Total 

Plant arbitrary. . . 
Division expense . 
Tug service 



Total division cost 

Administrative and general expenses. 



Total cost filling 

Porto Bello Large Rock. 

Quarrying — Quantities — cubic yards . 



Colon Breakwater. 
July. | Aug. Sept. Total. 



46.179, 44,958 



$0,022 
. 1647 
.063 
.0647 
.0940 
.0765 



SO. 4851 



SI. 1696 
.0082 
.0220 



$1 . 1998 

$071690 
.0340 
.0663 



$1.9542 
.1398 



SO. 0204 
.1481 
.0933 
.0435 
.0S98 
.0725 



$0.4676 



33,813 



124,950 



SO. 0058 $0.0171 



.0625 
. 1339 

.0442 
.0944 
.0364 1 



. 1311 
.0931 
.0515 
0926 
.0642 



SO. 3772 $0.4496 



44.95S 33,813 124.950 



SO 9 154 
.0084 
.0066 



SO. 6741 
.0119 
.0175 



$0. 9440 
.0093 
.0152 



Si) 9304 sn 7035 ,S" 9685 

$0.4548 ,"$0.3100 $0.3100 

.0381 1 .0388 .0368 

0844 .0793 .0764 



$1.9753 
.2446 



SJ 09+0 S> 2199 



$1.5088 
.1642 



SI. 6730 



$2.0253 



Stripping. 
Drilling . . 
Blasting. . 
Loading. . 



506 



$0.1034 

1.1407 

.5438 

.9001 



2,822 



SO. 0016 
.4178 
.9227 
.3021 



3,328 



SI. 8413 
.1840 



Items. 



Porto Bello Large Rock — Continued. 

Transportation 

Tracks 

Loading on barges 

Power 

Maintenance of equipment 

Plant arbitrary 



Total 

Towing — Quantities — cubic yards' . 



Operation, tugs and barges. 
Maintenance of equipment . 
Pla^t arbitrary 



Total 

Placing — Quantities — cubic yards . 



(operation, cranes 

Operation, trains 

Maintenance t-f equipment . 
Plant arbitrary 



Total 

Division expense . 



SO. 0171 
.5277 
.8651 
.3930 



Total division cost 

Administrative and general expense. 



Total cost, large rock 

Total material placed — Quantities — cubic 
yds 



Total cost . 



Colon Breakwater — Cont'd. 



July. 



Aug. Sept 



.2041 
1. 1411 
.0336 
.7305 
.9228 
.2690, 



.2337 
.2277 
.1486 
. 1430 
.6375 
.2690 



$5.98911 $3.303: 



Total. 



.2292 
3666 
.1311 
.2323 
.6809 
.2690 



$3.7120 



506 



SO. 7817 
.1691 
.4930 



$1.4438 



2,822 



$0.2690 
. 0298 
.4930 



$0.7918 



506 



$0.4647 
.4447 
.0814 
. 1400 



$1.1308 
$0.4847 



$9.0484 
1.2386 



$10.2870 



46,179 4S.464 



$2.0940 



$2.3097 



2,822 



3,328 



$0.3470 
. 0509 
.4930 



$0.8909 



3,328 



$0.2807 
.1172 
.0300 
.1400 



SO. 5679 
$0.1877 



$4.8511 
.4995 



$5.3506 



$0.3087 
.1670 
. 0378 
.1400 



$0.6535 
$0.2329 



$5.4893 
.6118 



$6.1011 



36.635 



SI. 9290 



128,278 



$2.1311 



PERMANENT r POWER HOUSE-GATUN 



Table No. 11. 





July. | Aug. 


Sept. 


Total. 






20,625 


1.210 


21.835 












$0.0034 


SO. 0074 
.2861 
.0275 
.0486 
.5043 
.0751 
.0505 
.2000 
.0752 


$0.0036 






.0159 








.0015 






.0313 
.0676 
.1392 
.0958 
.2000 
.0171 


.0323 







.0918 






.1356 






.0934 






.2000 






.0203 












$0.5544 
.0290 


$1.2747 
.1122 


$0.5944 






.0336 












$0.5834 


$1.3869 


$0.6280 










CANAL 




RECORD 



ANCON, CANAL ZONE, WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 15, 1911. No. 12. 



Volume V. 



The Canal Record 

Published weekly under the authority and supervision of 
the Isthmian Canal Commission. 



The Canal Record is issued free of charge, one copy 
each, to all employes of the Commission and Pana?na 
Railroad Company whose names are on the gold rolL 
Extra copies and back numbers can be obtained from the 
news stands of the Panama Railroad Company for five 
cents each. 

Address all Communications 

THE CANAL RECORD, 

Ancon, Canal Zone, 

Isthmus of Panama. 

No communication, either for publication or requesting 
information, will receive attention unless signed with the 
full name and address of the writer. 

NOTES OF PROGRESS. 



Dredge Corozal Accepted. 

It has been decided to accept the 1000- 
yards-an-hour ladder or elevator dredge 
Corozal, upon the report of the test it has 
undergone in Scotland. This is the dredge 
built on the Clyde for excavation in the Paci- 
fic entrance of the Canal and for maintenance 
work. 

Erecting Lock Gates. 

The work of erecting the upper guard gates 
in the twin locks at Gatun has been completed 
and the riveting on these gates is about fifty 
per cent finished. The gates will probably be 
hung and swung back against the walls in 
December, at which time they will be entirely 
completed, except for putting a concrete walk, 
with handrail, on top of each, and making the 
final adjustments and connections for the 
electric operating machinery. The gate 
erection now underway at Gatun is that of the 
upper operating gates, both flights. 

At Pedro Miguel, the upper guard gates in 
both chambers are 80 per cent in place, and 
the upper operating gates in the east chamber 
about 35 per cent. A new erection bridge 
and a new crane, for the McClintic-Marshall 
Construction Company, have arrived, and will 
be placed over the location of the lower oper- 
ating gates at Pedro Miguel. When the bridge 
and crane now in use at Pedro Miguel have 
completed their work on the upper operating 
and guard gates they will be moved to Mira- 
flores, leaving the rest of the gate construction 
at Pedro Miguel to be done with the new 
bridge and crane. 

On November 1, of the 50,000 tons of 
structural iron required for all the gates of the 
canal, 15,000 tons had arrived on the Isthmus 
and 3.000 tons had been erected. 



Nombre de Dlos and Chame Sand Service. 

Sand dredging at Nombe de Dios will be 
discontinued about November 15. The 
storage pile at Gatun, which contains about 
80,000 cubic yards, will be left full, and when 
sufficiently depleted a suction dredge and 



barges will be returned to the excavation area 
to restock the storage pile. It is estimated 
that only one such restocking will be neces- 
sary and that if the pile is full on July 1, 1912, 
it will contain enough sand to finish the con- 
crete work at Gatun. The lS-inch suction 
dredge which has been excavating sand at 
Nombre de Dios, will be set at work between 
Mindi and the lower end of Gatun Locks. 
Its greatest monthly output of sand amounted 
to 47.8S5 cubic yards and was in March, 1911. 
The Pacific Division will furnish hereafter, 
from the pit at Chame, all of the sand for all 
divisions except the Atlantic, for the Panama 
railroad and the relocation, and for sale to 
private parties. The Pacific Division is now 
using about 45,000 cubic yards of sand a 
month. The excavation at Chame is made by 
the ladder dredge Gopher, now temporarily 
supplanted by the Mole, while undergoing 
repairs at the Balboa shipyards. 

Pedro Miguel Locks. 

The laying of the foundation for the upper 
center wall of Pedro Miguel locks has ad- 
vanced to within 130 feet of the upper end. 
Old steel rails, embedded in the concrete in a 
vertical position, provide the reinforcement 
at this stage. Steamshovel 50 is at the upper 
end of the wall site, excavating for the con- 
tinuance of the foundation. 

A locomotive crane, equipped with an 
orangepeel bucket, is excavating residuum 
at the lower end of the east side wall, in pre- 
paration for the erection of the wing wall at 
this point. Besides this, there remains no 
further excavation at this end of the locks, 
except for the removal of the railroad embank- 
ments, on which lie the tracks to the west 
backfill and dam. 



Atlantic Terminal Docks. 

About twenty per cent of the structural 
steel for the caissons of the Atlantic terminal 
docks has arrived on the Isthmus and the 
remainder is to be here by the first of Jan- 
uary. The steel is received in flat sheets, 
and rolled and riveted in 5-foot sections at 
the Cristobal boiler shop. 

Thirteen caissons have been sunk to bed- 
rock and filled with concrete at pier 16. At 
pier 17, eight caissons have been set and sunk 
to depths vaiying between 25 and 55 feet 
below mean sealevel. 

The trestle of the mole, which is to extend 
across the inshore ends of the piers and carry 
the railway tracks to them, has been extended 
1,300 feet from the shore and a fill to mean 
sealevel extends 550 feet from shore. The 
end of the mole trestle is to be built 420 feet 
farther. 

Tidal Data for Pacific Entrance. 

In an examination of tidal data, compiled 
during the time of the French Canal companies 
and now on file in Washington, records were 
found recently that appear definitely to con- 
nect the Naos Island tide gauge with one that 
was established at Balboa. If such connection 



can be established reliably it will permit the 
use of over five years continuous records 
from the Naos Island station that have not 
been available up to the present time. The 
work of establishing this connection has been 
authorized. The additional data will be of 
value in a more definite determination of 
mean sea level at both the Atlantic and Paci- 
fic entrances to the Canal, and in the deter- 
mination of what tidal changes, if any, have 
already taken place or are in progress on 
account of the construction of the Pacific 
breakwater, the deepening of the channel in 
the Bay of Panama, and the changes that 
have been made in the basin of the Rio 
Grande above Balboa. 



Sale of Buildings in Lake Region. 

The sale of 65 Canal buildings in the Gatun 
Lake region, advertised for October 28, re- 
sulted in satisfactory bids being received for 
47 of them, the total of the bids being $3,052.- 
75. The few structures yet remaining in the 
villages of Bohio, Tabernilla, and San Pablo 
will be disposed of at private sale, or will be 
demolished and the material used elsewhere. 
The purchasers under the recent sale were as 
follows: 

H. A. Jacobs, Empire, five buildings at San 
Pablo, $460; Panama Republic, one at San 
Pablo and two at Tabernilla, $335.00; D. J. 
Gordon, Empire, one at San Pablo, $40 
George Clarke, Gatun, one at Bohio, $40; E 
B. Thornton, Empire, 12 at San Pablo, $568 
H. J. Wempe, Cristobal, four at Tabernilla 
$435; Fred Reuben, Culebra, two at Taber 
nilla, $30; T. F. Robertson, two at Bohio, $S0 
Frederick Samuels, one at Tabernilla, $3.00 
R. C. A. Cadogan. Colon, one at Tabernilla 
$95; E. Sardi, Bohio, two buildings at Bohio 
$50; Anthony Guardiola, one at Tabernilla 
$45; A. W. Piper, LasCascadas, four at Taber 
nilla, $308; C. B. Thaxton, Cristobal, two at 
Tabernilla, $102.25; J. A. Gordon, Empire, 
two at San Pablo, and one at Tabernilla, S105; 
J. Yon Redhead, Las Cascadas, one at Taber- 
nilla, $15; P. Canavaggio, Colon, one at 
Tabernilla, SI 26; Mezele Gustave, Empire, 
one at San Pablo, $125.50. Of the total of 
47 buildings sold, 5 are situated at Bohio, 20 
at Tabernilla, and 22 at San Pablo. 

In all there have been sold in the region 
between Gatun and Gorgona, the section that 
will be flooded by Gatun Lake, since January 
1, upwards of one hundred buildings from 
which over S4,700 has been realized. About 
90 per cent of these were structures included 
in the purchase from the French. Many of 
them had been repaired, fitted with new roofs, 
and made to serve as quarters for the Ameri- 
can Canal employes, while a lew were not used 
by the Americans, but merely sold at the best 
price obtainable. The buildings recently sold 
will be removed between now and January 1. 
1912. Most of them w ill In- rebuilt at hamlets 
along the relocated line of the railroad, others 
will be set up in the jungle on tracts leased 
from the railroad or Commission, and a few 



90 



THE CANAL RECORD 



Vol. V., No. 12. 



NOTES OF PROGRESS. 

(Continued.) 



will be removed to Panama and Colon for use 
in buildings there. 

It is the aim to have all the lake region 
between Gatun and Gorgona cleared of build- 
ings before the present line of the railroad is 
taken up because otherwise the hamlets 
would be isolated. The railroad will be taken 
up during the coming dry season (January to 
May) by the end of which the excavation in 
progress at Bohio and San Pablo will be com- 
pleted. All this clearing of the lake region 
is incident to the rise of the water in Gatun 
Lake, which will take place as soon as the dam 
in the spillway of Gatun Dam is raised to 50 
feet above sea level, which likewise will be 
accomplished during the coming dry season. 
One year hence the water in the lake will be 
at 55 feet above mean tide, within 30 feet of 
its final height. 



Gatun Dam Spillway. 

The concrete work in the Spillway of Gatun 
Dam is about 72 per cent completed, 161,667 
cubic yards, out of a total of 225,000, having 
been placed at the close of work on Novem- 
ber 11. A statement of the amount laid each 
working day last week, and of the total in 
place, follows: 



Date. 


Concrete 
Laid. 


Hours 
worked. 


No. 

Mixers. 


November 6 


140 
42 
72 
76 
88 
94 


6.30 
3.30 
4.00 
6.00 
5 30 
8.00 


1 
2 




1 


November 9 

November 10 


2 
1 
2 






Total 

Previously reported . . . 


512 
161,155 


33.30 


H 




161,667 









Porto Bello Crusher. 



Date. 


Hours 
worked. 


Cubic 

Yards. 




4.55 
3.50 
3.40 
2.55 
4.20 
4.50 


2,003 




1,604 




1.659 
1.386 




1,722 




2,006 






Total. .. 


24.30 


10.380 







Ancon Crusher. 



Date. 


Hours 
worked. 


Cubic 
Yards. 


November 6 


7.45 
6.30 
7.15 
8.15 
7.40 
3.00 


2,509 
3.151 




2 478 




3 020 




3,143 




1,088 






Total 


40.25 


15.389 



Central Division Unloaders. 
Lidgerwood cars were unloaded on the 
Central Division dumps during the month of 
October, as follows: 



Location. 


No. of 
unloaders. 


No. of 

trains. 


No. of 
cars. 




3 
3 

*4 


974 

636 

1,0.50 


19.480 
12,720 
21,630 










Total 


10 


2,640 


53,830 





*1 unloader worked from 1st to 9th only. 

Visit of Congressmen. 
A party of Congressmen and members of 
their families, comprising in all thirty-five 



persons, sailed from New York for the Isth- 
mus on the Panama railroad steamship Cris- 
tobal on November 9, and are due to arrive at 
Colon on Thursday, the 16th. There are six- 
teen Congressmen in the party, nearly all of 
whom are members of the Appropriation 
Committee. The sailing list is as follows: 
Congressmen, Fitzgerald, wife and two sons; 
Burleson, wife and daughter; Johnson and 



wife; Page and wife; Saunders and wife; 
Byrns and wife; Kinkead and wife; Good 
and wife; Sherley, Rauch, Sisson, Cannon, 
Gillett, Malby, Foster and Webb. The 
party includes also Secretary Courts of the 
Appropriation Committee, Mr. Smith, Clerk 
of the Committee, and three stenographers, 
and the secretary to Representative Fitz- 
gerald. 



CONCRETE WORK IN THE LOCKS. 



Over 70 per cent of the concrete for the locks is in place, the amount at the close of work 
on November 11, being 2,979,489 cubic yards, out of a total of approximately 4,199,400. A 
total of 27,274 cubic yards of concrete was laid in the locks during the week ending November 
11. 

GATUN LOCKS. 

Over S4 per cent of the concrete for the system of three twin locks at Gatun has been laid, 
the amount in place at the close of work on November 11 being 1,695,238 cubic yards, out of 
a total of 2,000,000. A statement of the amount of concrete placed in the locks each working 
day for the week ending November 11, and of the total, follows; and a similar statement for 
the work in the spillway of Gatun Dam is published elsewhere in this issue. The construction 
plant works 12 hours, daily, and the auxiliary plant 9 hours. 



Date. 



Construction Plant. 
2-cubic yard mixers. 



Concrete Hours 
placed, worked. 



Auxiliary Plant. 
2-cubic yard mixers. 



No. of, Concrete Hours No. of 
mixers nlaced. ' worked, mixers 



Large 
stone. 



Total. 



November 6 

November 7 

November 8 

November 9. . . . . 
November 10. 

November 11 

Portable mixers. 



Total 

Previously reported . 

Grand total 



Cu. Yds. 
1.344 
1,568 
1,610 
1,208 
912 
1.316 



7,958 



28.20 
26.18 
26.32 
22.22 
16.38 
20.54 



141.04 



Cu. 



Yds. 

550 

382 

184 

138 

240 

416 

281 



Cu. 



6.40 


2 


4.40 


2 


2.40 


2 


2.40 


2 


3.40 


2 


5.40 


2 



2,191 26.00 



Yds. 

40 
104 

68 

52 

52 

52 



Cu. 



Yds. 

1.934 

2.054 

1,862 

1.398 

1,204 

1,784 

. 281 



10.517 
1,684,721 



.695,238 



*The 2S1 yards shown for the portable mixers are reinforced concrete, and were placed on the following days: 
November 6th. 9i; November 7th, 25 5; November, 8th, 100: November 9th. 51; November 10th, 38; November 
Uth. 57. 

PEDRO MIGUEL LOCKS. 

Concrete work in the locks at Pedro Miguel is over 91 per cent completed, 764,246 cubic 
yards, out of a total of 837,400, bucket measurement, having been placed at the close of work 
on November 11. The record for each of the six 8-hour working days of last week, follows: 





Auxiliary Plant. 


Large 
stone. 






2-cubic yard mixers. 

Concrete Hours No. of 
placed, worked. ' mixers 


>-cubic yard mixers. 


Total. 




Concrete 
placed. 


Hours 
worked. 


No. of 

misers 






Cu. Yds. 
944 
504 
772 
392 
662 
618 


24.00 
13.50 
18.50 
10.50 
18.00 
18.00 


3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 


Cu. Yds. 
283 
184 
5 
182 
327 
228 


13.50 
8.50 
1.00 
10.25 
24.00 
18.50 


2 

1 
1 
3 
3 
3 


Cu. Yds. 


Cu. Yds. 
1.227 
688 




777 




574 




989 




936 












3,892 


102.50 


3 


1,209 


75.75 


2.17 


4,423 


5,191 




759,055 




















4,423 


764,246 



MIRAFLORES LOCKS. 

Over 38 per cent of the concrete for the system of two twin locks at Mirafiores was 
in place on November 11, the total amount on that date being 520,005 cubic yards, bucket 
measurement, out of a total of approximately 1,362,000. The record for each of the six 8-hour 
working days of last week, follows: 





Construction Plant. 
2-cubic yard mixers. 


Auxiliary Plant. 




Date. 


2-cubic yard mixers. 


i-cubic yard mixer. 


Total. 




Concrete 
placed. 


Hours 

worked. 


No. of 

mixers 


Concrete' Hours No. of 
placed, worked. 1 mixers 


Concrete 
placed. 


Hours ,No. of 
worked. ' mixers 


Large 
stone. 




Nov. 6. . . . 
Nov. 7 . . . . 
Nov. 8.... 

Nov. 9 

Nov. 10... 
Nov. 11... 


Cu. Yds. 
730 
720 
758 
606 
846 
814 


27.50 
31.00 
35.00 
27.00 
31.50 
26.08 


7 
7 
7 
7 
7 
6 


Cu. Yds. 
848 
798 
818 
918 
906 
682 


13.10 
12.40 
13.60 
13.40 
12.70 
10.55 


2 
2 
2 
2 
2 
2 


Cu. Yds. 
391 
401 
426 
448 
302 
154 


27.00 
25.50 
37.00 
37.00 
24.50 
8.00 


5 
4 
5 
5 
3 
1 


Cu. Yds. 


Cu. Yds. 
1.969 
1.919 
2.002 
1,972 
2,054 
1,650 


Total . . . 
Previously 


4.474 


178.08 


6.83 


4.970 


75.75 


2 


2,122 1 159.00 


3.83 


3,693 
3,693 


11.566 
508.439 


Grand 




















520,005 

























November 15, 1911. 



THE CANAL RECORD 



91 



AIR AND WATER SERVICE. 

Method by which Drills and Steamshovels in 
Culebra Cut are Supplied. 

Without water the steamshovels could not 
operate, and without compressed air it would 
be necessary to have a fire in each of the boilers 
of the 130 well drills working in Culebra Cut. 
But compressed air is used for both the well 
and the tripod drills, and like the water for 
the shovels it must therefore be supplied. 
This dual supply would be a simple matter if 
the shovels and drills remained in one place, 
but they are constantly moving forward, 
while as the excavation advances the eleva- 
tion at which they work also changes. An 
indispensable part of the digging of Culebra 
Cut, therefore, is furnishing a constant supply 
of water and compressed air, and this duty is 
assigned to a special section of the Central 
Division organization, which does no other 
work. 

Water is supplied from the reservoirs at 
Rio Grande and Camacho, and the pumping 
stations at Bas Obispo, Lirio, La Pita Point, 
Gamboa, and Dump Xo. 5 on the relocation 
of the Panama railroad, air from the compres- 
sor plants at Rio Grande, Empire, and Las 
Cascadas. A common method is used in 
distribution. 

Culebra Cut is, roughly speaking, 8i miles 
long. Across the south end, at Paraiso, runs 
the Panama railroad trestle, across the north 
end is the dike that guards the cut from flood- 
ing by the Chagres River, while about midway 
between these two points the suspension 
bridge at Empire spans the canal. A parallel 
system of air and water mains, 6, 8, and 10- 
inch pipes, runs along each side of the Cut, 
and the mains are connected by way of the 
trestle, dike, and bridge referred to, making a 
complete circuit around the Si miles of exca- 
vation, with a connection half way. At regu- 
lar intervals, usually about 1,5U0 feet, are 
gate valves by means ef which the water or air 
may be shut off from any section of the cir- 
cuit, without cutting the supply off from the 
remaining sections. At intervals of 500 feet 
lateral mains of 2, 4, and 6-inch pipe run from 
the supply mains over the edge of the Cut. 
These likewise are supplied with gate valves, 
and at their free ends are connections to which 
pipe or hose can be attached to carry water 
or air to the shovels or drills. 

In all there are 181,200 linear feet, or 34.31 
miles of 6, 8, and 10-inch air and water mains 
in use; and 45.300 feet or 8.6 miles of lateral 
drop pipes. An average of over 4UU,0U0 linear 
feet. 75.7 miles, of supply pipes to the drills 
and shovels from the lateral drops is taken 
up and relaid monthly. To keep the service 
in working order, the Superintendent of 
Municipal Work and Pipe Lines has at his 
order218 men, including one general foreman. 
seven foremen, and two steam engineers, all 
Americans on the gold roll, and the following 
silver roll men: Pipefitters, 62; pipefitters' 
helpers, 70; carpenters, 4; laborers, 54; messen- 
gers, 4; clerk, 1; watchman, 1; stationary 
engineer, 1; foremen, 8; oilers, 2; waterboy, 1. 

Day and night some men of this force patrol 
the edges of the Cut looking for leaks, breaks, 
and evidences of such movements in the banks 
as may result in breaks or in forcing a removal 
of the mains to other positions. In addition 
all the workers of both the night and day 
forces report mishaps of any character, and 
thus the the Superintendent at Empire is 
kept informed of the location of trouble. The 
"trouble" work is in addition to the regular 



work of changing pipes as the shovels and 
drills move forward. 

One night recently a portion of the bank on 
the east side of the Cut opposite Culebra slid 
into the Canal carrying with it a section of the 
mains from which water was supplied to half 
a dozen steam shovels near Gold Hill, and air 
to a battery of drills. Within half an hour 
after the break was reported the repair gang 
was at work. It was not possible to restore 
the mains at once, so the gate valves on either 
side of the break were closed, and pipes were 
laid from the mains on the west side of the 
Canal, across the bottom of the Cut — through 
the Culebra slide, over ditches, and under rail- 
road tracks — to the shovels and drills. It was 
after midnight when the break occurred, yet 
water and air were available at 7 o'clock that 
morning and the shovels and drills began 
work on time. It took a week to restore the 
mains. 

One of the frequent causes of moving the 
mains are the slides. At Culebra the gradual 
breaking away of the bank made it necessary 
a few months ago to move back both the air 
and water mains a distance of several hundred 
feet from the edge of the Cut. A similar 
removal was necessary at Cunctte, near Em- 
pire, a year ago, and several smaller shifts 
have been made on the east bank on account 
of slides. Such changes as these amount to 
taking up and relaying whole sections of the 
mains; yet on account of the system of two 
complete circuits maintained, these removals 
have never delayed the work. 

Two months of the dry season and two of 
the wet season have been taken to indicate 
the amount of work that must be done in this 
branch of the Culebra Cut service in order to 
keep the excavation force from delays due to 
waits for water and compressed air. The 
number of feet of pipe installed and moved 
during January, February, August and Sep- 
tember is as follows: 



Months. 


Installed 
tin. feet. 


Moved 
lin. feet. 


Total 
lin. feet. 




503.620 
454,860 
445.510 
400.710 


447.020 
423.130 
424.320 
370.620 




February 


877.990 
869.830 


September 


771.330 



These figures include a small amount of 
work in the Chagres section. 

An analysis of the work done in September, 
as regards the size of pipe installed and re- 
moved, follows, figures being for Culebra Cut 
only: 



Size of Pipe. 



Installed 
lin. feet. 



Removed 
lin. feet. 



Total 
handled 
lin. feet. 



j inch 4.930 

1 inch 168.400 



li inch. 
1 i inch. 

2 inch . 
2j inch. 

3 inch. 

4 inch . 
6 inch. 

10 inch. 



Total. 



21.060 
156,520 

32.S40 
7.(140 

1.540 

260 



400.710 



1,910 

146,380 

5.160 

17.640 

159,170 

30.960 

5,380 

1.7(," 

1,700 

560 



6.S40 

314,780 

10,740 

38.700 

315.690 

63.800 

12.420 

3,300 

4.240 

820 



370.620 I 771.330 



The concrete buttresses for the cofferdam 
erected on the caisson sill at the lower end of 
Gatm i .■. ill be sixty days old about the 

middle of December, and by that time the 
facing of the cofferdam will be finished. 
Suction dredges will then proceed with the 
removal of the earth dike in front of the 
locks, which now protects the lower chambers 
from inundation. It is planned to continue 
the construction of the side walls up to sea- 
level, placing bulkheads in the culverts to 
prevent their being flooded. 



STEAMSHOVEL RECORDS. 



Work In Culebra Cut and on P. R. R. Relocation. 

During the month of October the total 
amount of material excavated in the Central 
Division was 1,322,588 cubic yards, of which 
189.4S2 cubic yards were classified as earth. 
and 1,133,106 cubic yards as rock. 

Of this quantity 1,309,752 cubic yards were 
removed by steam shovels, 620 cubic yards 
by bucket crane, contractors removed 4,704 
cubic yards by sluicing, and 7,512 cubic yards 
by hand. 

The high record for the month was made by 
Shovel No. 224, working 25 days in the Cule- 
bra District, which excavated 46,657 cubic 
yards of rock. 

The second best record for the month was 
made by Shovel No. 254, working 20s days in 
the Culebra District, which excavated 45,- 
887 cubic yards of rock. 

^ The best record for a shovel of the seventy- 
ton class was made by Shovel No. 109, work- 
ing 24 days in the Culebra District, which 
excavated 29,362 cubic yards of rock and 
earth. 

Shovel No. 223, working in the Culebra 
District, made a high record for one day by 
excavating 3,219 cubic yards of rock on Oc- 
tober 7. 

Except where noted, monthly reports are 
computed by place measurement, while the 
daily reports are based on car measurement. 
The best records for the month and for one 
day are shown below: 

BEST RECORDS FOR THE MONTH. 

EKPIRE DISTRICT. 







Cubic 


Yards. 




Shovel 
No. 


Earth. 


Rock. 


Total. 


No. of 
days at 
work. 


215 


17,900 


17.849 
34.538 

33.110 


35.749 
34.538 
33.116 1 


26 


210 


26 


226 




26 









CULEBRA DISTRICT. 



224. I ; 46.657 46.657 ' 25 

254 : 45.887 45.887 20} 

207 I | 43.740 43.740 26 



PEDRO MIGUEL. 



122. 



24.786 24.786 



BEST RECORDS FOR ONE DAY. 



> 
o 

— 


Location. 


Date. 


Character of 

material 
excavated. 


Cubic 
yarda. 


'(,= 


Empire 

Pedro Miguel 


Oct. 23 
Oct. 21 
Oct. 9 
Oct. 7 
Oct. 2 
Oct. 1 1 
Oct. 6 


Rock 


2,500 


(05 


Rock 


2.260 


73? 


Rock 


2.225 


>M 


Ro> k 


3,219 


707 


Rock 


3.177 


>S4 


Rock 


2.679 


122 


Earth 


1.520 



Relocated Line of Panama Railroad. 

The total steamshovel excavation on the 
relocated line of the Panama railroad amount- 
ed to 367. OSS cubic yards. 

The best month's record was made by 
steamshovel No. 257, working on the Gatun 
section, which excavated 59,220 cubic yards 
of solid rock. 

In the 70-ton class, the best month's record 
was made by steamshovel No. 128, working 
on the Gatun section, which excavated 33,280 
cubic yards of earth and 8,000 cubic yards of 
solid rock, a total of 4 1 ,2S0 cubic yards. 

The best day's record for shovels with 5- 
yard dippers was made by steamshovel No. 
257, which excavated 3,380 cubic yards of 
rock on October 10. 



92 



THE CANAL RECORD 



Vol. V., No. 12. 



The best day's record for shovel with 3- 
yard dippers was made by steamshovel No. 
128, working on the Gatun section, which 
excavated 1,900 cubic yards of earth on Oc- 
tober 3. 

Month's records are by place measurement, 
and day's records by car measurement. All 
material was loaded in 10-yard dump cars. 
BEST RECORDS FOR THE MONTH. 



d 

.j 


Location. 


Cubic Yards by Cross Section. 


> 
o 

X 

ft 


Days 
worked. 


Earth 


Rock. 


Total. 


257 

128 
263 
121 
123 


Gatun 

Gatun .... 
Gatun .... 
Paraiso . . . 
Empire... . 


22 
26 
26 
26 
25 


"33.280 ' 

3,740 

26,585 

19,315 


59.220 
S.000 

37,280 
4,300 

11,000 


59,220 
41,280 
41,020 
30,885 
30,315 



BEST RECORDS FOR ONE DAY. 









Character of 






Location. 


Date. 


material 


Cubic 


o 
— 






excavated. 


yards. 


257 


Gatun 


Oct. 10 


Rock 


3,380 


262 


Monte Lirio . 


Oct. 11 


Earth and rock. . . 


3,220 


263 


Gatun 


Oct. 5 


Rock 


3,120 


266 


Paraiso 


Oct. 3 


Earth 


2,410 


128 


Gatun 


Oct. S 


Earth 


1,900 



Total steam shovel output during the month of 
October, 367,085 cubic yards. 

Total number of steam shovel working days, 270. 
Average output per working day, 1,360 cubic yards. 



Half-rate Transportation for Employes. 

The Panama railroad is preparing to sell 
mileage books to employes of the company 
and of the Isthmian Canal Commission at the 
rate of 2 J cents a mile for first class carriage. 
The books will be issued in 200 and 400 mile 
form, at S5 and $10 respectively, and in the 
case of the head of a family will be good for 
use by the holder and dependent members of 
his family. Two hundred and fifty pounds of 
baggage may be carried for each book. The 
books will be on sale at the stations of the 
railroad for cash, it having been decided not 
to use the deduction from salary system. The 
present system of issuing half rate tickets to 
employes will be discontinued as soon as the 
new system is put into effect. 

Second class carriage will be regulated by 
the terms of the following circular: 
Circular No. 401: 

Effective December 1, 1911. the issuance of second 
class half-rate requests, and the sale of second class half- 
rate tickets, will be discontinued. A flat rate of two 
cents per mile will be granted all second class passengers 
and revised passenger tariff covering is now being pre- 
pared. . J. A. Smith. 

General S upcrinleudcH t . 

Pilots, Mates, Masters, Engineers, Chauffeurs. 

Examinations for pilots, mates, masters 
and engineers; and for chauffeurs, will be 
held by the Board of Local Inspectors at the 
Administration Building, Ancon, on Novem- 
ber 22, 1911. All applicants for licenses as 
chauffeur must secure from the Department 
of Civil Administration, Executive Office, 
Ancon, forms of application, and information 
respecting the filling out of the same, not 
later than the day previous to the examina- 
tion. All applicants for examinations must 
be present at the Administration Building 
at 8.00 a. m. on November 22, with papers in 
proper form. In addition, applicants for 
chauffeurs' licenses must demonstrate their 
capacity properly to operate an automobile, 
and must have the automobile with them. 



The steamship Leelanaw arrived at the port 
of Balboa on November 10, from San Fran- 
cisco, towing the ship Babcock, with a full 
cargo of wine and barley for New York. 



CYLINDRICAL VALVES. 



Installation of Valves and Operating Machines. 

The work of installing the first of the cylin- 
drical valve machines in the locks was begun 
at Gatun last week and will probably be 
finished this week. This is the machine for 
valve No. 559, which is in the center wall of 
the upper locks at Gatun, and closes one of the 
30 openings from the center wall culvert into 
the lateral culverts of the three west lock 



the twin chambers may be used independent- 
ly of one another. In the side wall culverts the 
flow of water is regulated by gate valves in the 
culverts themselves, and there are no cylindri- 
cal valves controlling the flow through the 
lateral culverts. 

In the accompanying sketch (A) the posi- 
tion of the valves and the machines that 
operate them is shown with relation to the 
center wall culvert. The valves themselves 
are embedded in the concrete during the con- 




SKETCH A. 

TYPICAL SECTION OF CENTER WALL OF LOCKS AT CENTER LINE OF CYLINDRICAL VALVE. 

A— Macninery Operating Tunnel. B— Duct Space. C— Drainage Tunnel. D— Cylindrical Valve Machin- 
ery Chamber. E— Main Culvert. F— Lateral Culvert. G — Cylindrical Valve. H— Valve Stem Casing- 
K — Valve Stem. 



chambers. The number indicates only posi- 
tion, because in all there are only 120 of these 
valves in the locks — sixty at Gatun, twenty 
at Pedro Miguel, and forty at Miraflores. 
The object of the valves is to control the flow 
of water from the center wall culvert into the 
lateral culverts beneath the floor, whence it 
rises through wells in the floor into the lock 
chamber. This control is necessary in the 
case of the center wall culvert, in order that 



struction of the wall, an opening being left for 
the rising stem, and the chamber for the 
machine also being left open at the top until 
the machine is installed, after which the deck- 
ing of reinforced concrete will be laid. After 
they were placed some of the valves under- 
went tests, all of which were satisfactory, and 
.the machine now being installed also passed its 
test at the plant of the manufacturer in 
Wheeling, W. Va., in October. It is proposed 



November 15, 1911. 



THE CANAL RECORD 



93 



now to test both the valve and machine in 
place. 

Valves — The valves consist of two concen- 
tric hollow cylinders, one stationary and tin- 
other movable. The opening is closed when 
the movable cylinder is in its lowest position, 
at which time the upper end of the movable 
cylinder comes in contact with a leather 
washer making a seal; simultaneously the 
lower end is pressed against a turned metal 
surface, known as the valve seat. 

In the accompanying illustration (B) a 
section through a valve is shown. The upper 
cylinder is fixed and in it moves up and down 
the lower cylinder, in harmony with the im- 
pulse of the screw or stem. When the valve 
is closed this movable cylinder presses 
against the seat in the fixed casting at the 
bottom of the valve chamber, thus making a 
watertight seal. The opening from the center 



shown in skrlrli (A.) At its upper end the stem 
has fastened to it a non-revolving nut. This 
nut, and hence the valve and valve stem, is 
moved vertically through a distance of 3 I eel 
by means of a res olving screw, the end thrust 
being taken up by a roller bearing at the upper 
end ol the screw. The screw is actuated by a 
bevel mar, which is driven by a pinion on an 
extension of the motor shaft. A combination 
casing and bedplate carries the motor, limit 
switch, bearings, and all moving parts. A 
small oil pump geared to the motor shaft 
lubricates the thrust bearings, and motor 
shaft extension bearings. When the valve 
reaches its seat, shock to the machinery is 
prevented by allowing the thrust screw to 
rise through the thrust sleeve, giving the 
motor time to stop without shock. 

A test of two of the cylindrical valve 
machines, including that now being installed, 



heavier oil was substituted. The results of the 
test for machine No. 559 were as follows: 




i v '- 



SKETCH B. 

SECTION THROUGH CYLINDRICAL VALVE. 

Diameter of outlet from central culvert i\ feet; of outlet under valve <>! Feet; of movable cylinder of valve 
7 feet 1 J inches. 

culvert to the valve chamber is approxi- 
mately rectangular in shape, 4V X 13'-0". 
When the valve is entirely open the moveable 
cylinder is within the fixed cylinder, leaving 
2 feet 11 inches opening completely around 
the valve for the flow of water. The diameter 
of the moveable cylinder is 7 feet 1 'inches, 
that of the culvert below the valve 6' feet, 
for two feet below the valve seat, changing 
at a point three feet lower into an elliptic 
whose major axis is 8 feet and minor 6 feet 
6 inches. This elliptical culvert extends 
across the lock chamber under the floor. 

Machine — The stem by which the 
movable cylinder is raised or lowered, in other 
words by which the valve is operated, passes 
through a stuffing box mounted upon the 
upper end of the valve stem casing, which is 
bolted to tin fixed cylinder and thence through 
a metal casing to the operating mach'ae, as 



with the motors and limit switches, was made 
at the plant of the manufacturer, under the 
direction of a representative of the Commis- 
sion,' during September and October. For 
this purpose the machines were mounted in 
position similar to that they will occupy in the 
locks, and they were operated under various 
conditions with weights of 9,000 and 14,000 
pounds. After preliminary tests to check 
alignment, the fit of various parts, and the 
strength of the testing platform, the machines 
were operated through 100 cycles at intervals 
of from one to three minutes with four differ- 
ent motors and limit switches. In each 
instance the machine operated satisfactorily 
and in .i< with the specifications. 

Two kinds of lubricant were Used. Turbine 
oil proved so light that it was thrown or sque- 
ezed out by the centrifugal pressure so that a 



Stroke 

Time 

Running tor- 
que 

H. P. at coup- 
ling 

Amperes 

K. \Y. at mo- 
tor term'als 

Machine effi- 
ciency*. . . . 



Up Down 
9000 lbs 9000 lbs 



10.8 
34 



10 9 



18.5 
•0 



Up 

1.400 lbs. 



Down 
1.400 lbs. 



35} + li in. 35J + Uins 
11.4 sec. 9.4 sec. 



13.0 

44 

14 1 
*51.Sp. c. 



20 
-1.27 



•Efficiency, is the ratio of energy input to the motor, 
divided by actual energy output. This accounts for 
both electrical and mechanical losses. 



Washington Hotel Sea Bath. 

Work is nearing completion on the sea bath 
that will form part of the equipment of the 
new Washington Hotel now in process of con- 
struction on Colon beach. As soon as the 
bath and its houses are completed, it will be 
opened to the public. Canal and railroad 
emplo5'es, and guests of the Washington 
Hotel, not using the dressing rooms will be 
charged 5 cents for the use of the bath, and 
those using the dressing rooms will be charged 
25 cents, which will include the use of a shower 
bath and toweU. There will be ten bath 
houses for each sex, each house being for one 
person. 

The swimming pool is 125 by 100 feet, and 
from 3 to 9 feet deep. It is open on the sea 
side so that there is a continual change of 
water. 

Family Quarters for Tenth Infantry Officers. 

The War Department has authorized an 
additional expenditure of $25,000 from the 
"barracks and quarters" appropriation, for 
the construction of suitable quarters on the 
Isthmus for the families of officers of the 10th 
infantry. At present the families of the offi- 
cers are housed in very inadequate quarters 
at Camp Otis near Las Cascadas. 

Work has been begun on the removal of 
buildings from Tabernilla and San Pablo, and 
when they are re- erected at Camp Otis there 
will be suitable quarters for 45 officers. The 
Commission hotel at San Pablo will be moved 
to the camp and run as a post exchange. In 
all §50,000 has been apportioned for the bar- 
racks and quarters at Camp Otis. 
Electrical Engineers. 

Word has been received from the United 
States that a party of members of the Ameri- 
can Institute of Electrical Engineers, number- 
ing about 120 persons, will arive at Colon on 
January 25 and will leave for the States on 
February 1. The midwinter meeting will be 
held here and informal meetings will be held 
on board the ship both coming to the Isth- 
mus and returning to the States. 

Stamps in Books. 

Books of stamps, with the gummed side 
shielded by paraffine paper, will presently be 
on sale at the Canal Zone post offices. Only 
two cent stamps will be sold, and these in 
books of 12, costing 25 cents, and 24, costing 
49 cents. 



In the street improvements in the city of 
Panama, in the area bounded by Fourth of 
July Avenue and the Balboa Road, and lying 
west of Sixteenth Strict, 1.40(1 feet of sewer 
pipe has been laid and covered on AnCOn 
Boulevard, between the Balboa Road and a 
point south of the National Institute. 
Laterals are being laid from this main and the 
laying of water mains has begun. 



94 



THE CANAL RECORD 



Vol. V., No. 12. 



SOCIAL LIFE OF THE ZONE. 



Salvation Army. 

The dormitories of the new building of the 
Salvation Army Social Institute in Cristobal 
were opened this week with 86 beds, this being 
an increase of 12 over the number in the build- 
ing destroyed by fire in March. Since the 
opening of the present building in September, 
100 meals on an average have been served 
daily in the restaurant. The Commission has 
granted to the army the site occupied by the 
old building where a hall for holding services 
will be erected. A request has been made for 
permission to erect a building similar to the 
one now in use for institutional work in 
Panama. 

On Monday, November 13, Commis- 
sioner Richards, of the South African forces 
of the Salvation Army, and Col. Sydney Maid- 
ment, of the West Indies and South American 
Division, arrived on the Isthmus for an eight 
days' visit. During the week meetings have 
been held in the Wesleyan churches in Colon, 
Gatun and Panama, and in St. Andrews 
church, Gorgona, by courtesy of the Commis- 
sion and of the superintendents of the congre- 
gations. On Monday, November 20, Colonel 
Maidment, accompanied by Adjutant Catlin, 
head of the work for Panama and the Canal 
Zone, will leave for a visit to Bocas del Toro, 
Port Limon, and other points, and Commis- 
sioner Richards will return to England. 



Benefit for Widow of Captain Hammond. 

The following letter is published for the 
information of subscribers to the fund for the 
benefit of Mrs. Edwin D. Hammond: 

Empire. C. Z., November 9. 1911. 
Mrs. Annabell M. Hammond, 

South Orange, N. J. 
Dear Mrs. Hammond: 

Capt. A. W. Haynes of the Panama R. R. S. S. Alli- 
anca will hand you herewith a set of resolutions in mem- 
ory of the late Capt. Edwin D. Hammond, by his many 
friends on the istnmus of Panama and with the Panama 
Railroad and Steamship Company. 

Also he will hand you a Treasury draft for one thou- 
sand, One Hundred and Fifty Dollars (SI, 150.00). This 
amount was subscribed by the late Captains' friends to 
be used in a manner elected by you. 

Very respectfully, 

W. G. Ross, 
Secretary and Treasurer to the Committee. 

Convention of Isthmian Sunday School Associa- 
tion. 

The Isthmian Sunday School Association 
held a convention at Gorgona on Sunday 
afternoon, November 12, the occasion being 
the annual visit of the secretary for the Inter- 
national Sunday School Association, the Rev. 
Aquila Lucas. Fifteen Sunday schools in the 
Canal Zone were represented, 100 teachers, 
workers and officers being present. The meet- 
ing was presided over by the president of the 
association, the Rev. A. A. Nellis, Commission 
chaplain at Empire and Culebra. Addresses 
were made by Mr. Maurice H. Thatcher, who 
spoke on the Sunday school as a historic insti- 
tution; Justice Thomas E. Brown, Jr., who 
spoke on some values of Bible knowledge 
taking ethical, literary, and historical stand 
points; and the Rev. Mr. Lucas, who brought 
messages from the International association, 
and outlined the plans of that organization 
for the year. These plans fall under seven 
heads as follows: (1) Increase of effective 
organization; (2) incrtase of membership; 
(3) addition to the mission schools already 
organized; (4) additional interest in teachers' 
training classes; (5) organization of classes of 
adults for Bible study; (6) visiting, in con- 



nection with the home department of the 
Sunday schools; (7) conversions. 

After a period of inactivity a Sunday school 
was reorganized in Bas Obispo on November 
12 by the Rev. J. C. Elliott, and a school was 
started at Paraiso on the same day. 



of Red Men; Independent Association of 
Mechanics, Canal Zone No. 699; Independent 
Order of Paraman Kangaroos, Cristobal 
No. 8; Knights of Pythias, Panama No. 1. 



Saint Luke's Chapel and Guild. 

The annual meeting of the Woman's 
Guild of St. Luke's Hospital chapel, Ancon, 
was held at the Hotel Tivoli on Tuesday after- 
noon, November 7. For the first time since 
its organization, on December 2, 1907, the 
guild had been in recess, meetings having been 
suspended during the months of September 
and October. Events of the past year in 
which the guild had share or interest were, 
the decorating of the church for the services 
at Thanksgiving and Christmas, the children's 
service and Christmas tree on December 28, 
when about 40 children were remembered with 
gifts, the annual picnic for the Sunday school 
at Tobaguilla, an entertainment for the organ 
fund, and a reception to Bishop Knight on 
his annual visitation in January. Gifts to the 
church during the year are a credence shelf, 
a litany desk, altar linens, and silk fittings for 
use in the altar service. During Lent meet- 
ings were held each Tuesday morning at the 
Hotel Tivoli, at which a series of addresses on 
church history and ritual were given by the 
chaplain. The officers elected for the year are 
as follows: President, Miss J. M. Beattie; 
Vice-President, Mrs. Charles F. Mason; Secre- 
tary, Mrs. J. P. Fyffe; Treasurer, Mrs. H. C. 
Hanson. The next meeting will be held at the 
home of Mrs. W. C. Gorgas on Tuesday after- 
noon, November 21, at 3.30 o'clock. 

Under the direction of the guild the Sunday 
school of St. Luke's church will be reopened on 
Sunday, November 19. Instead of being as 
formerly from 9 to 10 o'clock, the school will 
meet immediately after the morning service, 
at 11 o'clock. 

The usual service will be held at St. Luke's 
church on Thanksgiving day at 9 o'clock. 
The service will be short. There will be an 
address and suitable music will be provided. 

The Rt. Rev. Albion W. Knight, bishop of 
Cuba, will arrive on the Isthmus on December 
30 for his annual visitation. He will remain 
about ten days. 



Church and Lodge Hall at Cristobal. 

Because of the encroachment of the work 
on Cristobal Point it has been found necessary 
to remove the offices of the District and Cir- 
cuit Courts from the rooms in Building No. 1, 
and the building erected by the Commission 
for church and lodge purposes has been re- 
modelled to accommodate the courts. The 
lower story will be used by the District, court 
and the upper story by the Circuit court, 
with offices for the officials. 

The Union church at Cristobal hopes to be 
able to erect a church building, but in the 
meantime, services will be held at the usual 
hour, every Sunday evening at 7.45, in the 
Commission clubhouse, and the Sunday school 
will remove into the room formerly occupied 
by the District court. 

Meetings of the lodges and societies will be 
held in the former rooms of the Circuit court. 
Following are the names of the societies that 
are affected by this change: Isthmian Order 
of Engineers and Conductors; Independent 
Order of Odd Fellows, Cristobal No. 2 and 
No. 474; Daughters of Pocahontas, Osceola 
Council, auxiliary to the Independent Order 



PERSONAL. 



Chief Justice H. A. Gudger, accompanied 
by his wife and daughter, arrived on the Colon 
from his annual vacation in the States on 
November 12. 

Sir Sydney Olivier, Governor of Jamacia, 
accompanied by members of his official house- 
hold, arrived on the Isthmus on November 
13, for a visit of four days. 

Major G. M. Hoffman sailed on the Alli- 
anca on November 11 to spend his annual 
leave in the States. 



Visitors to the Canal. 

The Hotel Tivoli has made reservations for 
the following parties of tourists. House Com- 
mit :ee on Appropriations, November 17, 35 
persons; American Bankers' Association, No- 
vember 30- December 2, 350 persons; Uni- 
versity of Cincinnatti students, Christmas 
holidays, from 40 to 200 persons ; House Com- 
mittee on Interstate and Foreign Commerce, 
December 18, 50 persons; American Insti- 
tute of Electrical Engineers, January 21 to 
February 1, 120 persons; Gregory tourists 
from St. Louis, January 25 to February 1, 
100 persons; Business Men's League of St. 
Louis, February 15 to 22, 100 persons; Steam- 
ship New York, luncheon, February 2, and 
March 6, indefinite number of persons. 



Church Notes. 

There will be a Thanksgiving service in 
Christ Church, Colon, on Thanksgiving Day 
at 9 a. m. On Sunday, November 19, the 
annual harvest festival services will be held 
in the church. 

The Ladies Auxiliary of the Empire Chris- 
tian League will hold a Thanksgiving enter- 
tainment in the chapel on Friday, November 
24. The program will consist of songs and 
recitations by the children of the village. 
The proceeds will be devoted to mission work 
in the Canal Zone. 

The "Fidelity" Bible study class for women 
has been organized in Empire, with Mrs. H. 
A. Smith as the president, and Mrs. Stephen 
Witt as chairman of the social committee. 
The meetings are held on the first Tuesday 
in each month in the chapel. At each meeting 
a program is provided; mothers' meetings are 
a feature, and a reception follows each meet- 
ing. 

I. B. of S. S. andD. M. 

Local No. 19, I. B.'of S. S. and D. M., will 
hold its regular meeting on Sunday, November 
19, at Empire lodge hall at 12.15 p. m. All 
members are requested to attend. 



Loyal Order of Moose. 

All members in good standing of the Loyal 
Order of Moose who are located on the Isth- 
mus are requested to communicate with Wm. 
A. Fawks, care of Division Engineer, Corozal, 
Canal Zone. 



The monthly outing of the Boy Scouts was 
held on November 3, the day being spent at 
Toro Point. A Commission launch was de- 
tailed to carry the boys over and return and 
transportation was given on the Panama 
railroad for the party, which consisted of 53 
b vs and six scout masters. The next outing 
will be held on Thanksgiving day. 



November 15, 191 1. 



THE CANAL RECORD 



95 



EXECUTIVE ORDER. 

Permits for Carrying Firearms. 

By authority of the President of the United 

States, it i« ordered: 

That Act No. 14 enacted by the Isthmian 
Canal Commission, by authority of the Presi- 
dent under date of September 3, 1904, emit led 
"An Act to Establish a Penal Code for the 
Canal Zone, Isthmus of Panama," as amended 
by the Executive Order issued under the 
authority of the President by the Secretary 
of War, December 1, 1909, be, and the same 
is herein", amended so that Section 456 of said 
Penal Code as amended in said Executive 
Order, shall now read as follows: 

"The license fees for permits issued by the 
Treasurer under the provisions of this Title 
shall be as follows: For every permit issued 
to carry a firearm abroad, five dollars ($5); 
for every permit authorizing an overseer or 
watchman engaged by a private employer, 
ten dollars ($10), for each watchman or over- 
seer so authorized to earn* a firearm; for 
each hunting permit, five dollars ($5); pro- 
vided that no charge shall be made for hunting 
permits issued to enlisted men of the land or 
naval forces of the United States stationed on 
the Isthmus of Panama. The treasurer shall 
keep a record of all licenses issued by him, 
with the name and residence of the persons to 
whom they are issued, and the date and serial 
number thereof." 

Henry L. Stimson, 

Secretary of War. 
War Department, Washington, D. C. 
November 3, 1911. 



OFFICIAL CIRCULARS. 



Consignment of Freight for Individuals or Com- 
panies. 
Culebra. C. Z., November 6, 1911. 
Heads of Departments and Divisions: 

It has been brought to my attention that certain 
repair parts ordered by the Darien Gold Mining Com- 
pany and the California-Atlantic S. S. Company were 
recently forwarded from the Gorgona Shops consigned 
to the Pacific Division at Balboa on I. C. C. billing. 
This was done to expedite shipments and save time. 
Although the facts in this instance were duly reported 
to the Panama Railroad Company in order that bill 
might be rendered against the two consignees, the 
practice is disapproved. For the protection of the 
Panama Railroad Company it is directed that all 
freight intended for individuals or companies be accu- 
rately consigned. Geo. W. Goethals, 

Chairman and Chief Engineer. 



Acting Superintendent of Construction, Atlantic 
Division. 
GATUH. November 10. 1911. 
Effective November 11, and during the absence on 
leave of the undersigned, Mr. C. R. Hughes, Superin- 
tendent. will.be in charge of construction work of the 
Gatun Dam and Spillway. 

He is hereby authorized to sign my name over his 
initials to property papers. 

G. M. Hoffman. 
Approved: Resident Engineer. 

Chester Harding, 

Acting Division Engineer. 



Sale of Panama Cafe Building. 
Panama Railroad Company, 
Office of General Superintendent, 

Colon, R. P., October 27, 1911. 
Sealed pioposals for tne purchase of buil^ 
on lot north of Panama passenger staiion, and known as 
"Panama Railroad Cafe" building, will 1>< 
tnis office until J. 00 p. m.. No\ ember 2U, and then 
opened. 

Bids must be made for the building as it stand? on the 
ground, the successful bidder to remove the building 
within tairty days' time after notified that bid has been 
accepted. 

Proposal-* snould be accompanied by certified c.ieck. 
Post Office money order, or c?sh. for 5 per cent of the 
amount of bid, whicn will be returned to unsuccesslul 
bidders. 

The successful.bidder^will be given, a freight rate of 



S per ton in case it is desired to ship the material to 
any point along the line. 

Envelopes containing bids should be endorsed: "Pro- 
of Panama Railroad Cafe Build- 
ing." and addressed to 

J. A.Smith. 

General Superintendent, 

Panama Railroad Company. 



Misdirected Letters. 



Ancon, C. Z., November 15. 1911. 
The following insufficiently addressed letters origi- 
nating in the United States and its possessions, have 
been received at the office of the Director of Posts, and 
may be secured upon request of the addressees: 

LETTERS UNCALLED FOR NOVEMBER 8. 



Cartier. Henry F. 
Cartv. John I. 
Clarke. John VY. 
Crawford. E. M- 
Edwards. Claud R. 
Grindstaff, Frank 
Gorno. John (or Gomo) 
W. H. 



McGeorge, James 
Marshall, John 
Mehenimed, Husein 
Napier. Mis^ A 
Ridenhour. J. P. 
Ridenhour. J. P. (pkg.) 
Rose. John 
Rouse. Frederick 



M udrickson, Wm.H.(pkg.)Seyboid, G. E. 
Kelly, Larneh Spangler, Leonard G. 

Kidston. W. S. (2) Thomas. Emanuel 

Kidston, W. S. (pkg.) Turner, Mrs. C. 

McCowan. F. P. Wiltshire. Charlotte 

McGowan, F. P. 

LETTERS UNCALLED FOR NOVEMBER IS. 



Atherly. Arnold 
Auer. Geo. 
Baseshore. A. 
Bennick. F. G. 
Burns. Lawrence 
Campani. Sidney 
Cook. Otis 
Cutler, Harry 
DeGraham. F. F. 
Fitzgerald. Emmett 
Ford, A. P. 
Foster. Frank 
Griffin. John J. 
Harrison, Fred. N. 
Hersh.S. J. 
Hess, William 
Hicks. Hugh C. 
Hopkins, S. C. 
Humphrey. E. E. 
Jennings. S. W. 
K.ratli, John O. 



Leigey. Paul 
McLaughlin. Patrick A. 
Martin. Mrs. A. 
Mitchell. J. C. 
Novensky, Miss Pearl 
Pro. John 
Quick. P. H. 
Rodriguez. Jesus & Co. 
Shire, William 
Shrimpton, Mrs. Bessie W. 
Smith, J. T. 
Strom. Charles A. 
Swartzenholzer, Lawrence 
Syhut, Stanislaw 
Vanneman, Rolt 
Vaughan, Chas. C. 
Villane. Guglielino 
Walters. Felise 
Willing. Lt. E. S. 
Witmer. G. S. 
Zirkle. John L. 



Rainfall from November 1 to 11, 1911, Inclusive. 



Stations. 



Pacific Section 

Ancon 

Balboa 

*Miraflores 

Pedro Miguel. . . . 

Rio Grande 

Central Section — 

Culebra 

♦Camacho 

Empire 

Gamboa 

♦Juan Mina 

Alhaiuela 

*E1 Vigia 

♦Gorgona 

San Pablo 

Tabernilla 

Bohio 

*Monte Lirio 

tic Section — 
in 

♦Brazos Brook. . . 

Colon 

Porto Bello 

♦Nombre de Dios . 



1 c 








3* 




X c 


,3 


C« O 




s 


a 


Ins. 




74 


4 


.80 


7 


1 05 


10 


.96 


8 


2.67 


11 


2.28 


11 


2 22 


4 


2.78 


11 


2.28 


11 


1.41 


4 


2 46 


fi 


1.58 


4 


1.46 


4 


.97 


5 


1.25 


.■> 


2.80 


4 


3.17 


11 


3.79 


6 


7 . 55 


7 


2.98 


7 


1.71 


7 


1.35 


/ 



I71S. 

2 07 
1 91 
4.39 
4.36 
8.43 

7.95 
7.47 
6.87 
6 79 
5.01 
8.69 
6 50 



41 
5.39 
5.82 

11.74 
13.45 

12.13 
II 50 
8 20 

17.27 
7.23 



*Standard rain gauge — readings at 5 p. m. daily. 
Automatic rain gauge at unstarred stations — value 
midnight to midnight. fTo 5 p. m. November 10. 



Stages of the Chagres. 
Maximum heights of the Chagres River for the week 
ending midnight. Saturday. November 4, 1911. All 
heights are in feet above mean sea level. 





Station. 


Day and Date. 


Vigia. 




cs 

o 
.5 

a 


d 


c . 


































< 





H 


CJ 




Sun.. Nov. 5.. . . 


127.6 


93 9 


48.7 


19.4 


18 


4 


Mon., Nov. 6. . 


129.6 




49.3 


20.2 


IS 


8 


■ iiv. 7. . . 


134.5 


98 7 




21.6 


19 


9 


Wed*, Nov. X. 




95.2 


50.2 


21.4 


20 





Thurs.. 


1 !S 4 




48 5 


20.4 


19 


9 


Fri., X 


129.4 


95.0 


48. * 


20.2 


19 


6 


Sat.. Nov. 11.. . 


Ul 2 


96.3 


51.8 


20.8 


19 


4 


Height of low 
















125.0 


92 


44.0 









COMMISSION CLUBHOUSES. 

Activities of the Young Men's Christian Associa - 
tion. 

The following is the schedule for moving picture shows 
for the week of November 20 to 25: Monday. Gorgona; 
Tuesday. Gatun; Wednesday, Cristobal; Thursday. 
Culebra; Friday. Empire; Saturday, Corozal- 

The standing of the teams in the Isthmian Basket, 
Ball League on November 11. was as foUi 

Train. Won. Lost. P. C. 

Cristobal 6 1.000 

Gatun 4 1 .800 

Gorgona 3 2 600 

Culebra 2 3 .400 

Corozal 4 .000 

Empire 5 .000 

Standing of the Isthmian Ten Pin League is as follows ; 
Team. Won. t. P. C. 

Empire 44 16 .733 

Gatun 34 26 .567 

Cristobal 33 27 .550 

Gorgona 26 34 .417 

Marines 2fi 34 .417 

Culebra 17 43 .283 

CULEBRA. 

A local bowling tournament was organized on Satur- 
day with four teams entered, each composed of six n tn. 

The following were high scores for the week: Ten 
pins— Driscoll. 201; Case. 217; Cushing. 222; Warner 
202. Duckpins— Palmer, 112; Case. 108; Dundas. 1C6, 
Judge. 106, 104. 

EMPIRE. 

The basket-ball game played Saturday. November 
11, between the "Has Beens" and the regular team 
resulted in the formers' winning by the score of 32 to 16. 
The line-up was as follows: 

"Hasbeens". First Team. 

Eason L. Forward Alley 

Warr R. forward Koperski 

Bartholemew Center Busl y 

King L. guard Adan s 

Conn R. guard Greening 

The regular monthly business meeting of the Literal y 
Society will be held Friday evening, November 17. A 
good program has been arranged for this meeting. 

Fifty new library books have just been placed in the 
library. They include some of the late fiction. 

GORGONA. 

The Social Study Club met Wednesday evening, 
November 8, and discussed the subject of accidents in 
industrial enterprises. At the meeting of the Club on 
November 15, the topic, ""Health a Christian Duty," 
will be taken up. 

Gorgona lost to Cristobal. Saturday night at basket 
ball, with a score of 12 to 10. The line-up was as follows: 

Cristobal. Gorgona. 

Sartor Forward Loudon 

Schlager Forward Moyer 

Wilier Center Swanson 

Luce Guard and Forward Earle 

Sterner Guard and Forward Carpenter 

Schwalenberg Guard Booz 

Causeneau Guard Calvit 

Next Saturday night the Gorgona team goes to Gatun. 

GATUN. 

Twenty-three men met on Sunday evening and dis- 
cussed the subject, "Unsanitary Occupations." under 
the auspices of the Drop-in Discussion Club. Those 
who spoke were: Messrs. Hastings. Windes. J. W. 
Smith. Christianson, Hanson, Gilkey. and Fitzgerald. 
The subject for November 19. will be "Sanitary Legisla- 
tion." 

One hundred and twenty-five new books were received 
from the States on Saturday. November 11, and 
placed on the shelves. The books are mostly popular 
fiction and books for boys. The addition of these books 
brings the number up to the thousand mark. Any 
member of the club may draw books by depositing one 
dollar and a half. 

Thirty-five menhave signed up for the Spanish classes, 
which meet every Wednesday evening under the leader- 
ship of Senor Gomez. 

The following equipment will be added to the club- 
house in the near future: New punching bag disc, pri- 
vate locker, one vaulting horse, one jumping board, one 
climbing rope, one vaulting parallel-bars and IS plants 
of various kinds to be used for decorating purposes. 
It is purposed to purchase material for a wrestling mat 
cover if such can be found on the Isthmus. 

A large chorus of mixed voices will be organized at the 
V. M. C. A. in i lie course of the next lew days. Mr. A. 
B. Dickson will act as leader. 

CRISTOBAL. 

The Checker Club effected a permanent organization 
on Thursday evening. The following officers were 
elected: President, H. B. Furlong; Vice-President, W. 
T. Harrison; Secretary. K. E. Herrington. 

The Chess Club also completed its organization. 
electing the following officers: President, G. K. Weston; 
Vice-President. W. V. Morrison; Secretary, E. S. 
Randolph. 



96 



THE CANAL RECORD 



Vol. V., No. 12'. 



COMMISSARY DEPARTMENT. 



For the Convenience of Bachelors. 

Effective November 6, 1911, the Commis- 
sary store at Corozal will be patronized only 
by bachelors and laborers from 11 a. m. to 1 
p. m., and from 5 to 7 p. m. Women a id 
children who wish to make purchases should 
do so between 8 and 11 a. m. and 3 and 5 p. m. 
Bachelors and laborers will be admittedat all 
times when the store is open. 



Leelanaw.irom San Francisco; November 10, Babcock, 
from San Francisco; November 11, Manavi, from 
Buenaventura; November 11, Peru, from Guayaquil. 
Departures — November 7, Quilpue, to Valparaiso; 
November 8. Chile, to Guayaquil; November 10. 
Pleiades, to San Francisco. 



The commissaries are open during the following 
hours; 

Cristobal, 8 a. m. to 12.30 p. m., and 2 to 7 p. m. 
Balboa, 8 a. m. to 12.30 p. m., and 2.30 to 7 p. m. 
Ancon, 8 a. m. to 1 p. m., and 3 to 6 p. m. 
All others, 8 a. m. to 1 p. m., and 3 to 7 p. m. 

There have been no material changes in the cold 
storage price list since its publication two weeks gao. 

Red Cross Finances. 
A statement of Red Cross finances for 
October follows: 

RECEIPTS. 

October 1. On hand S2.025.14 

October 1, Interest on cash. in 
bank. July and Au- 
gust 9-59 

Total receipts $2,034.73 

DISBURSEMENTS. 

October 2, Relief of destitute fa- 
mily at Empire. ... S5 00 

October 13, Relief of wife of pri- 
soner at Culebra. . . 15.00 

October 23, To assist in deporta- 
tion of family at 
Empire 100.00 

October 31, Relief of blind man 
at Cristobal, ac- 
count of Colon fire. 25 . 00 

Total disbursements $ 145.00 

October31, Balance on hand .. . $1,889.73 

John L. Phillips, Treasurer. 
Approved : 

C. A. Devol, Chairman. 



Family Quarters. 

Applications for married quarters were on file on 
November 1 , as follows : 



District. 



Ancon 

Ancon Hospital . 

Balboa 

Bas Obispo 

Corozal 

Cristobal 

Culebra 

Empire 

Gatun 

Gorgona 

Las Cascadas . . . 
Pedro Miguel . . . 

Porto Bello 

Toro Point 



Total . 



List 
No 1. 



4 (1) 



1 

1 (1) 
4 



1 (1) 
..... 



14 (3) 



List 
No. 2. 



46(11) 
6 (2) 
29 (6) 
28 (4) 
43 (5) 

120 
32 (2) 
64 (35) 

131 (43) 
75(27) 
24 

42 (9) 
10 (9) 
6 (2) 



6S6U55) 



Note — The figures in parenthesis show the number 
of applicants already occupying regular or nonhouse- 
keeping family quarters at stations other than those 
at which applications are filed. 



The following vessels arrived at, or departed from the 
port of Balboa during the week ending November 11: 

Arrivals — November 6, Barracoula, from San Fran- 
cisco; November 7, Pachitea, from Callao; November 
8, Quito, from Guayaquil; November 8, Limari, from 
Valparaiso; November 9, Newport, from San Francisco; 
November 10, Peru.irom San Francisco; November 10, 



Pacific Division Sand Service. 

A report of sand cars loaded and shipped 
from Balboa during the month of October, 
follows: 



Destination. 


Number 
Cars. 


Cubic 
Yards. 




2,428 

29 

40 

1 

7 

9 

35 


43,204 
435 




946 




25 




175 
225 




561 








2.549 


45.571 





Tide Table. 

The following table shows the time of high and low 
tides at Panama for the week ending November 22, 
(75th meridian time): 



Date. 


High. 


Low. 


High. 


Low. 




A.M. 

12.45 
1.40 
2.30 
3.10 
3.50 
4.25 


A.M. 
6.00 
7.05 
7.55 
8.43 
9.25 
10.05 
10.43 


P.M. 
12.20 
1.25 
2.18 
3.05 
3.45 
4.20 
4.55 


P.M. 
6.25 
7.25 


November 19 


8.18 
9.00 
9.45 




10.25 




n.no 



Supplies for Canal Work. 

The following steamers, with supplies for the Isth- 
mian Canal Commission, arrived at the ports of Cris- 
tobal and Colon, during the week ending November 11: 

Chatham, November 5, from New York, with 128,- 
367 bags of cement, for Atlantic and Pacific Divisions. 

Eva, November 5, from Mobile, with 43,000 pieces 
cross ties, for stock. 

Allianca, November 6, from New York, with 8,500 
pieces building tile, 192 bundles steel bars, for Panama 
Railroad Company; 21 cases pumps, for Pacific Divi- 
sion; 30 packages locomotive springs, 9 bundles loco- 
motive springs, for Mechanical Division; 15 drums 
welding compound, 41 barrels rosin, 32 drums kerosene, 
200 cases linseed oil, 1,000 kegs track spikes, 25 cases 
signal fittings, 83 cases lye, 8 cases chisels, 10 pieces 
castings, for stock; and a miscellaneous cargo, the 
whole consisting of 10,293 packages, weighing 337 tons. 

Corozal, November 9, from New York, with 4,537 
pieces steel rail, for stock. 

Heredia, November 9, from New Orleans, with 61 
pieces creosoted piling, for Atlantic Division; 7 cases 
incandescent lamps, 174 pieces white oak lumber, for 
Mechanical Division; 47 pieces white oak lumber, 
6,526 pieces yellow pine lumber, 25 pieces untreated 
piling, for stock; 1,215 pieces cross ties, for Panama 
Railroad Company; 19 cases castings, 150 packages 
switch stands, 280 packages switch points, 20 cases 
lampblack in oil, 53 rolls cotton duck, 924 bales rice 
straw, for stock. 

Melapan, November 9, from New York, with 500 
packages garbage cans, 11 cases hammer handles, 25 
cases putty, 14 bundles iron bars, 43 pigs tin, 21 cases 
fuse, 70 bundles wire, 80 cases brooms. 81 bundles iron 
pipe, 300 cases oil. 310 drums oil, for stock; 80 casks 
copper, for Mechanical Division; 50 pieces steel beams, 
for Panama Railroad Company. 

San Mateo, November 11, from New Orleans, with 
376 drums gasoline, 831 pieces yellow pine lumber, for 
stock. 

A concert will be given by the Isthmian Canal Com- 
mission Band at the Hotel Tivoli. Ancon, C. Z., on 
Sunday. November 19. 1911, at 7.30 p. m. 

The next concert will beigiven at Empire, C. Z., 
November 26, at 6 p. m. 



MOVEMENT OF OCEAN VESSELS. 



NEW YORK TO CRISTOBAL. 

Advance P. R. R.. Saturday . Nov. 1 1 

Panama P. R. R..Saturday.Nov. 18 

Allianca P. R. R..Friday... .Nov. 24 

Colon P. R. R..Friday.. . . Dec. 1 

Advance P. R. R.Thursday.Dec. 7 

Panama P. R. R.Thursday.Dec. 14 

Allianca P. R.R.. Wednesday Dec. 20 

Colon P. R.R.AVednesdayDec. 27 

Advance P. K. R..T uesday. . Jan. 2 

Panama P. R. R.. Tuesday. .Jan. 9 

Allianca P. R. R. Monday. .Jan. 15 

Colon P. R. R.. Monday.. Jan. 22 

Advance P. R. R..Saturda> .Jan. 27 

Panama P. R. R..Saturday .Feb. 3 

Allianca P. R. R..Friday... .Feb. 9 

Colon P. R. R..Friday....Feb. 16 

CRISTOBAL TO NEW YORK. 

Colon P. R. R..Saturday.Nov. 18 

Advance P. R. R. Friday... .Nov. 24 

Panama P. R. R..Friday.. . . Dec. 1 

Allianca P. R. R.Thursday.Dec. 7 

Colon P.R.R.. Wednesday Dec. 13 

Advance P.R.R.-Wednesday Dec. 20 

Panama P.R.R.. Wednesday Dec. 27 

Allianca P. R. R.Tuesday . Jan. 2 

Colon P. R. R.Tuesday.. Jan. 9 

Advance P. R. R.. Monday. .Jan. 15 

Panama P. R. R-. Sunday . . .Jan. 2 1 

Allianca P. R. R..Sunday.. .Jan. 28 

Colon P. R. R..Saturday.Feb. 3 

Advance P. R. R..Friday. .. . Feb. 9 

Panama P. R. R.. Friday Feb. 16 

Allianca P. R. R.Thursday.Feb. 22 

Colon P. R. R..Thursday.Feb. 29 

NEW YORK TO COLON. 

Prinz Eitel Friedrich H.-A.. .Friday Nov. 10 

Trent R. M. . . Saturday . . . Nov. 1 1 

Almirante U. F. C.Thursday. . . Nov. 16 

Prinz Joachim H.-A. . . Saturday . . . Nov. 1 8 

Santa Malta U. F. C.Thursday.. .Nov. 23 

Prinz Sigismund H.-A Friday Nov. 24 

Oruba R. M . .Saturday . . .Nov. 25 

Metapan U. F. C.Thursday. . . Nov. 30 

Prinz August Wilhelm H.-A. . . Saturday . . Dec. 2 

Zacapa U. F. C.Thursday. ..Dec. 7 

Prinz Eitel Friedrich H.-A. . . Friday Dec 8 

Magdalena R. M . . Saturday . . . Dec. 9 

Almirante U. F. C.Thursday.. ..Dec. 14 

Prinz Joachim H.-A.. .Saturday.. . .Dec. 16 

SantaMarta U. F. C.Thursday.. .Dec. 21 

Prinz Sigismund H.-A. . .Friday Dec. 22 

Clyde R. M. . .Saturday . .Dec. 23 

Metapan U. F. C.Thursday . . Dec. 28 

Prinz August Wilhelm. . . . H.-A . . . .Saturday . . Dec. 30 

COLON TO NEW YORK. 

Metapan U. F. C. .Thursday. .Nov. 16 

Prinz August Wilhelm . . . .H.-A. . .Tuesday.. . .Nov. 21 

Zacapa U. F. C.Thursday. . .Nov. 23 

Prinz Eitel Friedrich H.-A . .Saturday. . .Nov. 25 

Magdalena R. M . . Tuesday. ... Nov. 28 

Almirante U. F. C.Thursday. . . Nov. 30 

Prinz Joachim H.-A .. .Tuesday.. . .Dec. 5 

Santa Marta U. F. C.Thursday.. .Dec. 7 

Prinz Sigismund H.-A. . . Saturday. . . Dec. 9 

Clyde R. M. .Tuesday Dec. 12 

Metapan U. F. C.Thursday. . . Dec. 14 

Prinz August Wilhelm.. . .H.-A . . Tuesday. ... Dec. 19 

Zacapa U. F. C.Thursday.. .Dec. 21 

Prinz Eitel Friedrich H.-A Saturday . .Dec. 23 

Thames R. M Tuesday . . .Dec. 26 

Prinz Joachim H.-A... .Tuesday.. .Jan. 2 

NEW ORLEANS TO COLON. 

Parismina U. F. C.Saturday Nov. 1 1 

Cartago U. F. C.Wednesday. Nov. 15 

Turrialba U. F. C.Saturday. .. .Nov. 18 

Abangarez U. F. C.Wednesday . Nov. 29 

COLON TO NEW ORLEANS. 

Abangarez U. F. C.Thursday.. Nov. 16 

Heredia U. F. C. . Thursday. . Nov. 16 

Cartago U. F. C . Thursday. . Nov. 23 

Parismina U. F. C.Thursday.. Nov. 23 



CLASSIFIED EXPENDITURES. 



A statement of classified expenditures of the Isthmian Canal Commission to September 30, follows: 



Department 
of Civil 

Administration 



Department 

of 

Law 



Department 

of 
Sanitation. 



Department of 

Construction 

'and Engineering 



To June 30, 1909 3,427.090.29 

Fiscal year, 1910 709,351.37 

Fiscal year, 1911 I 755,079.44 

July. 1911 | 72.895.22 

August. 1911 74.768.45 

September, 1911 64,905.24 



Total . 



5,104,090.01 



2,527.35 
1,878.27 
1,805.83 



9,673.539.28 

1.803,040.95 

1,717,792.62 

137,635.83 

156,954.79 

146,912.23 



69,622,561.42 
26,300,167.05 
27,463.401.31 
2,084,530.55 
2,282.614.77 
2.203,821.59 



General Items. 



78,022.606.10 

2.863,088.83 

3,112,334.60 

317,751.38 

359,978.95 

243,114.65 



Fortifications. 



86,243.14 
86,275.56 



6,211.45 ! 13,635,875.70 ! 129,957,096.69 | 84,918,874.51 



Total. 



160.745,797,09 

31,675,648.20 

33.048,607.97 

2.615,340.33 

2,962,438.37 

2,746,835.10 



172.518.70 233,794,667.06 



CANAL 




RECORD 



Volume V. 



ANCON, CANAL ZONE, WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 22, 1911. 



No. 13. 



The Canal Record 

Published weekly under the authority and supervision of 
the Isthmian Canal Commission. 



The Canal Record is issued free of charge, one copy 
each, to all employes of the Commission and Panama 
Railroad Company whose names are on the gold roll. 
Extra copies and back numbers can be obtained from the 
news stands of the Panama Railroad Company for five 
cents each. 

Address all Communications 

THE CANAL RECORD, 

Ancon, Canal Zone, 

Isthmus of Panama. 

No communication, either for publication or requesting 
information, will receive attention unless signed with the 
full name and address of the writer. 

NOTES OF PROGRESS. 



Chairman's Report. 
The report of the Chairman of the Isth- 
mian Canal Commission for the month of 
October is published in full in other columns 
of this issue of The Canal Record. It 
gives a detailed account of the progress of 
the Canal work in all departments and divis- 



Upper Guide Wall at Gatun Locks. 

In (he construction of the cellular section 
of the upper guide wall at Gatun Locks, that 
is, of the southernmost 750 feet of the center 
wall which extends from the upper guard 
gates 1500 feet into Gatun Lake, the 45 feet 
next the M>lid portion of the wall have been 
completed. The wall is 60 feet wide and the 
top is 99 feet above mean sealevel. At the 
outer end of the wall, and advancing toward 
the locks, a section 200 feet long has been 
built up to an elevation of 61 feet. A stiff- 
legged derrick has been installed on its present 
top and will place the concrete for the remain- 
ing 38 feet of elevation. Between these 
portions, the work is in various stages ■ ! ad- 
vancement. About 30 per cent of the piles 
on which the wall is to rest have been driven. 
No difficulty is anticipated in having the wall 
built up to at least 23 feet above sealevel 
for its entire length by April 1. 1912, as re- 
quired by the scheduled raising of the surface 
of Gatun Lake. 



Miraflores Locks. 

Hydraulic excavation for the open channel 
and basin south of Miraflores Locks is ad- 
vancing with more satisfaction than was the 
case during the excavation for the lower lock 
chambers, the soil to the south containing 
less of gravel. During the month of October 
52,500 cubic yards were removed by this 
method, making the total to November 1, 
872,867 cubic yards. In this section the 
pumps removing the silt will be placed on 
stationary foundations beside sumps, it hav- 
ing been decided to abandon the concrete 
barges on which they have rested heretofore, 
because heavy rocks interfere with their 



movements. Two of the barges have been 
sawed to pieces and removed and the third 
barge will likewise be destroyed when the ma- 
chinery on it is transferred by means of a 
track now being built. Part of the silt pumped 
from this section will be used for completing 
the hydraulic core of Miraflores Dam, but 
the greater part will be piped to the east of the 
Canal channel and used for filling in swamps. 
A retaining fill of earth is being thrown along 
the east side of the proposed Canal channel, 
west of the embankment for the railroad track 
to the Balboa sand wharf, for several hundred 
yards and the basin thus formed will also be 
filled hydraulically, to the level of the adjoin- 
ing land. 

The laying of concrete for the east side wall 
of the lower locks was begun last week, berm 
crane "F" having placed foundation over an 
area about 40 feet long and of the full base 
width, 28 feet. 



Ancon-Sosa Swamp Reclamation. 

The fill of the tidal swamp between Ancon 
and Sosa Hills and to the south of the Panama 
railroad track to Balboa, is about 20 per cent 
completed. Three dump tracks are in use on 
it. One began just south of the Panama rail- 
road and parallel to it and is swinging radially 
to the south as the dump advances. Another 
began just north of the track leading to the 
Xaos Island breakwater and the other Balboa 
dumps, and fill is made from this toward the 
one first mentioned. The third lies south of 
the Naos Island track and the fill is made 
toward Ancon Hill. The material used is from 
Culebra Cut and approximately 600,000 
cubic yards will be disposed of, raising about 
66 acres an average of 6 feet, with a slope 
from the center to afford drainage. The 
elimination of the swamp will improve sani- 
tary conditions and afford a site for buildings 
or railway vards. 



Story of the Fossils. 

Another shipment of fossils collected from 
the excavations on the Isthmus will presently 
be sent to Washington for classification by the 
i iovernment experts there. The collection of 
tertiary fossils made on the Canal work up to 
the present time is said by Dr. T. W. Vaughan 
of the i - Geological Survey totbe the best that 
has ever been made in tropical America, and 
the information given by them and by a 
study of the rocks in which they occur will 
mark a new epoch in the geology of Central 
America. In fact, I >r. Vaughan said during 
his recent visit to tin- Isthmus th.it the geo- 
logical section now being studied here con- 
tains more data of vital import to the geology 
of the world than that of any other section so 
far studied. 

The University "l Princeton spent many 
thousands of dollars in explorations in South 
America that had to do with the history of 
animal life, both prehistoric and recent, but 
this work like similar work carried on by other 



scientific bodies, has heretofore lacked the 
confirming evidence of geology with regard to 
animal migrations between North and South 
America. ( >n this account biologists and 
paleontologists are waiting with interest for 
a history of the disappearing and reappearing 
land connection between the two Americas. 
The Carnegie Institution at Washington 
is contemplating a study of the geology of all 
the countries bordering upon the Caribbean 
Sea, with a view to correlating and broaden- 
ing the little known geology of the region. 
The geological work now being done on the 
Isthmus will form one of the standard sections 
of comparison in this broader work. 



Gatun Spillway Dam. 

Wooden forms are being placed on the west 
part of the Spillway for the construction of 
the inner shell of the concrete tunnel for ma- 
chinery operating devices. On the east wing of 
the Spillway all the forms of the correspond- 
ing phase of this construction have been 
erected and about 90 per cent of the concrete 
has been laid. The tunnel shell is of rectang- 
ular shape with arched roof, 10 feet wide, and 
is S feet high, interior measurement. Con- 
crete is to be laid around this form to make a 
shell one foot thick, and the outer walls and 
superstructure will be built so as to leave a 
space from 12 to 36 inches surrounding the 
shell on sides and top. The air space is to 
intercept seepage through the walls and assure 
the machinery protection from moisture. 
Channels at the base of the shell, between it 
and the outer walls, will drain off the seepage. 



Repair of Dredge Spud. 

One of the two holding spuds of pipe-line 
suction dredge No. 83, which is supplying 
hydraulic fill to the west wing of the Gatun 
Dam from the borrow pit below that wing, 
was broken on November 18, by the force of 
a caving-in of the bank against which the 
dredge was working. The dredge was towed 
to the coal chute trestle at the southern end 
of the lagoon and an emergency spud was 
it tiled for the broken one. the metal 
parts of which will be attached to new timbers, 
forming a new spud to be reserved for emer- 
gencies. The work of substitution re- 
quired the use of a 75-ton crane and it was 
necessary to renew some of the timber of the 
Ie and otherwisi bol im it before the 
crane could be sent out on it. 



Postal Business. 

During the month of October then were 
18,085 money orders issued, amounting to 
8417,576.85. ' Of this amount 
was issued payable in the United State-. 
$110,781.39 in the < v>07.61 in 

Martiniqi in I osta Rica. The 

fees amounted to SI. 893.08, and the amount 
of orders paid and repaid was S91.942.85. 

Postal sales during the month amounted to 
$6,501.00, and newspaper postage to $16.10. 



98 



THE CANAL RECORD 



Vol. V., No. 13. 



CANAL WORK IN OCTOBER. 



Monthly Report of the Chairman and Chief 
Engineer to the Secretary of War. 

Culebra, C. Z., November 15, 1911. 
The Honorable the Secretary of War. 
Washington, D. C. 

Sir: I have the honor to submit the follow- 
ing report of operations on the Isthmus for the 
month of October, 1911. 
Department of Construction and Engineering. 

The following table summarizes the prin- 
cipal items of construction work accomplished 
by the Atlantic, Central and Pacific Divisions 
during the month: 



Miraflores — Practically none of this mate- 
rial has been manufactured or shipped. 

LOCK GATE ERECTION. 

Gatun — Upper guard gates, 54 feet 8 inches 
high; leaves 37, 38, 39, and 40: These leaves 
were practically erected with bolts, and the 
interior riveting was done on October 1. 
The only additional work done during the 
month was the riveting of a total of 15 panels 
of sheathing in all 4 leaves, i. e., the equiva- 
lent of about one side of one leaf, making a 
total of 34 panels to date. There remain to be 
riveted on these 4 leaves, 70 panels of sheath- 
ing out of a total of 104. 



Item. 


Dnit. 


Atlantic. 


Central. 


Pacific. 


Total. 




Cubic yards 


66.031 

470.400 


1.314.483 
4.704 


136.245 
339.815 


1.516.759 
SI4.919 








536.431 


1.319.187 


476.060 


2,331.678 












Cubic yards — 

Tons (Gross)... 
Feet 


432,625 

56.794 

53.25 

49.962 




47,830 

86.510 

35.45 

96.316 


480,455 

143.304 

281.67 

522.347 
8.29 
23.29 

113,220 
153,637 








192.97 

376,069 
8.29 
16.26 












3.37 

43.638 
63.S17 

0.43 

1.797 

45.041 

7.374 
16.72 


3.66 

69.582 
89.584 




Cubic yards 




236 








Feet 

Feet 


1.675 

50 

43.530 

8.390 

13.42 


4,654 

461 

9,750 

5,301 

10.69 


8,126 

511 

98.321 

21,065 

13.52 







First Division, Office of the Chief Engineer. 

MASONRY AND LOCK STRUCTURES. 

The material under contract for work de- 
signed in this subdivision is being inspected 
by the force of the General Purchasing Officer 
in the United States, and the erection work on 
the Isthmus is being conducted by the Divis- 
ion Engineers, the inspection of which is cared 
for by this subdivision. Several experiments 
of flow of water through orifices were also 
conducted under supervision of this office. 

LOCK GATES AND PROTECTIVE DEVICES. 

Shop work in the United States — Up to the 
20th of October. 35.684 tons of material had 
been accepted at the mills, and 20,274 tons 
of structural material were shipped from the 
shops, or about 40 per cent of the total con- 
tract. (This item in the last month's report 
should have been 16,431 tons, instead of 20,- 
765 tons, as given). 

Gatun — The upper guard gates (4 leaves 
54 feet 8 inches high), the upper gates, and 
the middle gates, upper lock, (8 leaves 77 
feet high) have been manufactured and prac- 
tically all the material has been shipped. 
The safety gates and lower gates, upper lock 
(8 leaves 77 feet high) have been 98 per cent 
manufactured, and about 90 per cent has 
been shipped. The middle and lower gates, 
middle lock (8 leaves 77 feet 10 inches high) 
are about 12 per cent manufactured, and 
practically no material has been shipped. 

Pedro Miguel — The upper guard gates (4 
leaves 54 feet 8 inches high) have been manu- 
factured, and practically all structural ma- 
terial has been shipped. The upper and mid- 
dle gates (8 leaves 79 feet high) have been 
98 per cent manufactured, and about 90 per 
cent of the material has been shipped. The 
safety and lower gates (S leaves 79 feet high) 
have been 68 per cent manufactured, and 
about 45 per cent of the material has been 
shipped. In addition to this a considerable 
tonnage of castings and a few handrailings 
have been shipped. 



Upper gates, 77 feet high; leaves 33, 34, 
35 and 36: The erection bridges, which had 
been used at the upper guard gates, were 
moved into position at the upper gates Oc- 
tober 4-7. Since then, girders and frames 
have been erected, but not all riveted, 3 
panels high on leaves 33 and 34; 8 panels high 
on leaf 35, and 7 panels high on leaf 36. The 
girders and frames in 2 panels of leaf 35, and 
2 panels on leaf 36, have been riveted up. 
The work of adjusting these girders has been 
rather tedious, owing to some extent to too 
great haste in erecting the several stories with- 
out proper adjustment. 

Pedro Miguel — Upper guard gates, leaves 
50, 51, 52 and 53: Leaf 50, the skeleton has 
been erected with bolts during the month 
from top of 7th panel to top of gate, and 
riveted from third panel to top of tenth, 
sheathing bolted on 4 panels on downstream 
side, but none riveted. Leaf 51 — The skele- 
ton erected with bolts from top of the first to 
top of the tenth panel, and riveted to top of 
third panel; no sheathing erected. Leaf 52 — 
Skeleton erected with bolts from top of fifth 
to top of seventh panel, riveted from top of 
second to top of fourth panel; no sheathing 
bolted on. Leaf 53 — Skeleton erected with 
bolts from top of seventh panel to top of leaf; 
riveted from top of fifth to top of eleventh 
panel; sheathing erected with bolts 10 panels 
on downstream side, none riveted. 

The total work of the month consisted in 
erecting, with bolts, 13 panels of skeleton, 
and riveting 18 panels of the same. There re- 
main 9 panels to bolt together and 24 to rivet, 
besides all the sheathing. The work on these 
leaves, 51 and 52, has been much delayed by 
non-receipt of material. 

The total tonnage erected to date without 
regard to its being riveted or not is 2,800 tons, 
out of a total of about 58.000 tons, or 4.8 per 
cent, and the total number of field rivets 122,- 
000 out of 6,500,000, or about 2 per cent of the 
total. 



INSPECTION OF OPERATING MACHINERY AND 
ELECTRICAL EQUIPMENT. 

The force of this subdivision, reporting di- 
rectly to this office, has cared for the techni- 
cal matters relating to inspection as follows: 

(/) For the Stoney gate and cylindrical valve 
machines, purchased under Circular 614 — Pre- 
liminary tests have been made of the first 
Stoney gate valve machine erected at the 
shops of the contractor. In general, the ma- 
chine performed its functions satisfactorily, 
with the exception, when working under max- 
imum load, of a few minor details which are 
easily remedied; satisfactory results were 
obtained under the smaller loads. Complete 
tests have been made of the second cylindri- 
cal valve machine at the works of the con- 
tactor with motors of different manufacture 
and under different loads, and, with minor 
modifications, such as were made upon the 
first machine, it performs all of its functions 
satisfactorily. 

(2) For the rack railway and other material 
purchased under Cicular 619 — For Classes 1, 
2, 3, 4, 7 and 8, under this circular, which are 
now under contract, the state of completion 
of delivery varies from 6 to 33 per cent. On 
all portions of this circular under contract, 
satisfactory progress has been made during 
the month, with the exception of the rack 
castings, and the difficulty which the con- 
tractor has experienced with shrinkage cracks 
and washouts has been practically overcome. 

(3) For the gate operating machines, Class 
1, and miter forcing machine;, Class 2, pur- 
chased under Circular 627 — Satisfactory pro- 
gress has been made with the gate operating 
machines, but the contractor has experienced 
difficulty in obtaining a suitable main casting 
of the casing for the miter gate forcing ma- 
chine. 

(4) For the gate and girder hoisting machin- 
ery for the emergency dams, purchased under 
Circular 616 — Tests are in progress upon the 
three types of worm gearing hoists to be tried 
out as a part of this contract at the works of 
one of the sub-contractors. 

During the month considerable material 
consisting of steel ties, channels and washers 
and other track material for the locks has been 
received and inspected. 

The force organized for the installation of 
machinery and electrical equipment on the 
Isthmus completed two sets of wooden forms 
for the installation of foundation bolts for two 
Stoney valve machines, and installed all 
foundation bolts for machines Nos. 260 and 
261, and foundation bolts for cylindrical 
valve 559. Sixty yards of concrete were 
placed during the month. 

EMERGENCY DAMS. 

The inspection work in the United States 
has progressed satisfactorily during the month. 
Up to the 2Uth of the month a total of 241 
drawings of the turning and wedging machin- 
ery had been .:pproved. At the works of the 
contractors, t.bout 600 tons of nickel steel, 
and about 512 tons of carbon steel castings 
and forgings have been fabricated to date. 
Satisfactory progress has also been made on 
the roller bearings, all the roller bearings for 
one dam having been completed during the 
month. 

AIDS TO NAVIGATION. 

During the month 104 acres of land have 
been cleared in the Gatun lake section for 
sites for beacons and reference buoys, at an 
average cost of S10.83 per acre; 60,450 linear 



November 22, 1911. 



THE CANAL RECORD 



99 



feet of trochas were cut; and the necessary 
land for making surveys was cleared and pro- 
UK- taken. 

Work on the construction of Range 9-11, 
Pacific Division, continued during the month. 
The caisson for the front tower was completed 
and work on this tower will be begun at once. 
The tower walls, lantern, and lantern root ol 
the rear tower are in place, and the newel post 
for the circular stairs was constructed to a 
height of 12 feet during the month. Con- 
struction of the foundation for the front tower 
of Range 13- 1-t in the same division was 
Started during the month. 

Atlantic Division. 
GATUN LOCKS. 

Excavation — During the month one shovel 
was engaged on borrow pit excavation for the 
locks backfill, 21,723 cubic yards of material 
being removed. 

Backfill — Backfilling behind the side walls 
of the upper, middle and lower locks, and in 
the center wall of the upper lock, was con- 
tinued. The quantity placed during October 
aggregated 11-4,740 cubic yards, increasing the 
total to 913,466 cubic yards. On October 31 
the backfilling was 56.82 per cent completed. 

Receiving and Issuing Material — The con- 
sumption of rock exceeded the receipts by 
5,637 cubic yards, ami the receipts of sand 
and cement exceeded the consumption. 

Mixing and Placing Plants — Both plants, 
and all portable mixers, were kept in satis- 
factory operation during the month. 

Power Plant and Pumps — The operation of 
the power plant and pumps was satisfactory. 

Iron and Steel Work — During the month 
335.8 tons of fixed steel and 133,437 feet of 
reinforcing rods were placed; 65.8 tons of 
reinforcing rails and 150 feet of electric return 
track were laid. 

Concrete Work — There was a decrease of 
3,662 cubic yards in the amount of concrete 
laid as compared with the figures for the pre- 
ceding month. The daily average for the 26 
working days was 2,063 cubic yards, as com- 
pared with a daily average during September 
of 2,292 cubic yards. The total amount of 
concrete placed during the month was 53,- 
636 cubic yards, including 1,424 cubic yards 
of large stone. The bucket measurement 
exceeded the place measurement by 6343 
cubic yai^ls. Of the total concrete, 6,541 
cubic yards were placed in the upper lock. 5,- 
289 cubic yards in the middle lock, and 41,- 
806 cubic yards in the lower lock. The ion- 
Crete work for the entire lock system was 
83.68 per cent completed at the end of Oc- 
tober. 

OPERATION OF THE PERMANENT AND AUXILIARY CON- 
CRETE CONSTRUCTION PLANTS. 

Permanent Auxiliary 
Plant. Plant. 



II .48 



8.50 



5 . 49 
5.00 



1 mi 



Length of working day (hours) . . 
Average number of hours per 

day worked, per strand of 

cableway laying concrete and 

large stone (actual working 

time) 

Average number of mixers per 

day 

Average hourly output per mixer 

(actual working time),cu. yds. 
Average amount of concrete and 

large stone laid per hour, per 

strand of cableway (actual 

working time) cu. yds 

Large stone laid, cu. yds 

Concrete laid, cableways. cu.yds. 
Concrete laid, through chute in- 
to dump cars, cu. yds 

Concrete laid, derricks, cu. yds 4, 07-1 

Concrete laid, dump cars, cu. yds 5, 

Concrete laid, portable mixers 1.656.5 

Total amount of concrete an<j 

large stone laid. cu. yds 42,732 11.538.5 



59 91 



3.1.80 
1.424 

39.47S 



1,830 



GATUN DAM. 

Construction during the month incre 
the lot.il fill as determined by cross sections 
of the material in place, by 432,625 cubic 
yards, making the total amount in place 16,- 
200,725 cubic yards. 

Hydraulic Fill — The dredges increased (In- 
hydraulic fill by 214,320 cubic yards. The 
total hydraulic fill in place October 31 was 
8,472,486 cubic yards. 

Dry Pill — The material received from the 
Central Division and from stcamshovels 
Nos. 116 and 134, amounting to 218,305 cubic 
yards was placed on the north and south toes 
of the dam, east and west of the spillway, 
making the total dry fill in place 7,728,266 
cubic yards. 

GATUN SPILLWAY. 

Excavation — In preparing foundations for 
the spillway dam, 112 cubic yards of rock 
were removed by hand. On October 31, t he- 
total spillway excavation amounted to 1,586,- 
296 cubic yards. 

Concrete — The work of placing concrete was 
continued. The amount placed during the 
month aggregated 3.15S cubic yards, which 
increased the total to 162,539 cubic yards. 
The concrete work for the spillway was 72.23 
per cent completed. 

HARBOR AND CHANNEL SECTION. 

Excavation below sea level at Mindi — During 
the month two steamshovels removed 6,570 
cubic yards of earth and 59,349 cubic yards 
of rock from the canal prism. 

Dredging from the Ocean to Mindi — Six 
dredges removed 432,653 cubic yards of earth 
and 37,747 cubic yards of rock from the canal 
prism. On October 3 1st 40 feet of watercould 
be carried from Zero to Zero p'us 1,900 feet; 
35 feet to Mile 3 plus 2,400 feet; 30 feet to 
Mile 3 plus 3.600 feet; 20 feet to Mile 5 plus 
2,438.9 feet, at the junction with the Frenrh 
( '.in.il. 

PORTO BELLO. 
PERFORMANCE OF ROCK CRUSHER PLANT. 

Length of working day. hours 8.00 

Average number of hours worked per day. . 4 . 06 
Average number of cubic yards per hour of 

workingday 209. 79 

Average number of cubic yards per working 

hour 413.08 

Maximum day's output (Shouts 30 minutes) 

cu.yds.. " 2,358.00 

Wexage day's output (26 days) cu.yds.. ,. 1,678.38 
Average hourly output (193 hours 50 min- 
utes, cu. yds 225. 13 

Total output for the month, cu. yds 43,638.00 

SAND, STONE, AND CEMENT SERVICE. 

In connection with this service plant 

steamed 6,250 miles, handled 780 barges, and 

carried 2,565 passengers. 

WEST BREAKWATER, COLON. 
Twenty three thousand seven hundred and 
sixty-five cubic yards of material were ex- 
cavate!, of which amount 21,815 cubic yards 
were placed in the breakwater, 150 cubic yards 
were used for breakwater track, and 1,800 
cubic yards for fortification track fill. The 
double track trestle was extended 335 linear 
- t. On October 31 the trestle extended 
7 linearfeet from shore. The total amount 
of rock dredged and dumped on the west 

breal I>er 1, 1911, was 726,717 

cubit yards. During the month 37,747 cubii 

Iged and dumped, in- 

tsing the total to 764,464 cubic \. 
-'in of dry till placed to November 1 
was 506,655 cul 

HOHBKE DL Dlos. 
During the month 81 barges, containing 



38.92S cubic yards of sand, were shipped to 
Gatun. 

MUNICIPAL ENGINEERING. 

The reservoirs, water main-., sewei , roadf 
and oil pipe lines were maintained and ex- 
tended as required to facilitate construction 

work. 

Central Division. 

During the month of October the cotal 
amount of material excavated in the Central 
Division was 1,322,588 cubic yards, of which 
1S9.482 cubic yards were classified as earth 
and 1,133,106 cubic yards as rock. Of this 
quantity 1,309,752 cubic yards were removed 
by steamshovels, 620 cubic yards by bucket 
crane, and contractors removed 4,7(14 cubic 
yards by sluicing and 7.512 cubic yards by 
hand. Of the total. 1,319,187 cubic yards 
consisted of primary excavation foi (lie canal 
prism, and 3,401 cubic yards was excavation 
for tracks outside of prism 

The daily average number of steamshovels 
at work during the month was 41.46, and the 
total number of shove) days was 1,078, as 
compared with 42.00 at work during the 
month of September, with 1,050 shovel days. 

For comparison with the work done by 
steamshovels during the corresponding month 
of the previous year, the following table has 
been prepared: 



Period. 


Excava- 
ted by 
shovels. 


Classification of 
material. 




to 7J 

^ m ■> 

K "0 O - 

I &13 




Rock. 


Earth. 




1910: 
Oct 

1911: 
Oct.. .. 


Cu. Yds. 
1,598.335 

1.309.752 


Cu. Yds. 

1,076,678 

1.124,974 


Cu. Yds. 
521.657 

184.77S 


47. 50 
41.46 


c. y. 

6 1.294.20 
!(\ 1.215.W) 



Rainfall at Empire: 1910. 12.57 ins.: 1911. 14.97 ins. 

The above table shows the average output 
per shovel to be 6.12 per cent greater in Oc- 
tober, 1910, than in the corresponding month 
of the present year. 

The total amount of material excavated 
from the prism in the Culebra Section of the 
Central Division in October, 1911. 1,310,373 
cubic yards, was the highest record in that 
section for the month of October, ex ept Oc- 
tober, 1910, when 1.320,314 cubic yards were 
removed. 

The total estimated amount of material to 
be removed in the Central Division, accord- 
ing to the revised estimate of July 1 , 1911, was 
101,801,296 cubic yards, and up to November 
1, 1911, 82,843,278 cubic yards had been re- 
moved, leaving IS, 958, 018 cubic yards to be 
removed in order to complete all excavation 
in the Central Division. From these figures 
it will be seen that 81. 3S percent of all excava- 
tion in the Central Division had been com- 
pleted up to the close of the month of October, 
and 18.62 per cent remained uncompleted. 

Considering the two sections which com- 
pose the Central Division, the excavation 
completed and that to be completed at the 
close of October operations were as follows: 

CULEBRA SECTION. Cu. Yds. 

Completed 70,942,244 

To be completed 18.501,761 

CHAGRES SECTION. Cu. Yds. 

Completed 11.901.034 

To be completed 456,257 

From the above figures h will be seen that 

the Culebra Section, locally known as the 

"Culebra Cut," v.. is 79.32 per i ent compli 

with 20. 6S per cent to be completed; the 

n was 96.31 per cent com- 

with 3.69 per cent to be completed. 

During the month 8,379 cubic yards of ma- 



100 



THE CANAL RECORD 



Vol. V., No. 13. 



terial were hauled from the canal prism and 
dumped in the embankment for the roadbed 
of the relocated Panama Railroad. The total 
amount of spoil from the Central Division 
used for this purpose at the close of the month 
was 3,962,807 cubic yards. The Central 
Division also delivered at Gatun 201,828 
cubic yards of rock and earth, and 11,519 
cubic yards were delivered to the Atlantic 
Division at Matachin, for use in the construct- 
ion of the dam, making the total for this pur- 
pose at the end of October, 4,669,618 cubic 
yards. 

During the month 21,660 cubic yards of 
rock and earth were delivered to the Pacific 
Division for use as backfill for the Pedro 
Miguel locks. 

The daily average number of laborers at 
work on the whole Division during the month 
was 7,602, and the daily average number of 
gold employes was 788. 

Pacific Division. 
DISTRICT NO 1 — LOCKS AND DAMS. 

Excavation — The total excavation during 
the month amounted to 136,245 cubic yards, 
of which 10,070 cubic yards were classified as 
earth, and 126,175 cubic yards as rock. 

Filling and Embankment — During October, 
3,400 cubic yards of dry filling were added to 
the prism of the west dam at Pedro Miguel, 
increasing the total amount of material in 
place at the close of the month to 308,381 
cubic yards. The backfill at Pedro Miguel 
was increased by 53,800 cubic yards, the total 
in place at the end of the month amounting 
to 403,300 cubic yards. 

At Miraflores, 37,250 cubic yards were 
added to the dry fill in the toes, and 7,180 
cubic yards to the hydraulic fill in the core of 
the west dam, making the totals at the end of 
the month 1,014,847 cubic yards and 646,278 
cubic yards respectively. The backfill was 
increased by 31,850 cubic yards, the total 
aggregating 235,388 cubic yards at the end of 
the month. 

Pedro Miguel Locks — The general backfilling 
of the west wall was practically completed at 
the end of the month. Tracks were laid prep- 
atory to cutting in a steamshovel to excavate 
the hill back of the east lock wall, the spoil 
from which will be cast over and used for 
backfill. The filling in of the middle wall with 
sand and screenings was continued. The 
amount of iron placed in the masonry aggre- 
gated 90,394 pounds. 

Concrete Work — The total amount of 
concrete and large stone laid at Pedro Miguel 
was 25,637 cubic yards, as compared with 15,- 
379 cubic yards during September. The con- 
crete was placed as follows: 2,363 cubic yards 
in the floors; 377 cubic yards in the north- 
west wing wall; 590 cubic yards in the north 
center guide wall; 8,050 cubic yards in the 
east wall: 5,607 cubic yards in the center wall ; 
and 8,650 cubic yards in the west wall. 



OPERATION OF THE PERMANENT AND AUXILIARY CON- 
CRETE CONSTRUCTION PLANTS AT PEDRO MIG UEL. 

Permanent Auxiliary 
Plant. Plant. 



Length of working day (hours). . 

Average number of hours per - 
day worked laying concrete 
and large stone (actual work- 
ing time) 

Average number of mixers per 
day 

Average hourly output per Cu. Yds. 
mixer (actual working time).. . 

Average amount of concrete and 
large stone laid per hour, per 
chamber crane (actual working 
time) 



Large stone laid . 
Concrete laid . . . 



Total concrete laid . 



43.4<i 



6,165.00 



6,165.00 



8.00 



6.00 

Cu. Yds. 

27.00 



12.00 
19,460.00 



19,472.00 



Permanent plant consisted of two chamber cranes, 
placing. 

Auxiliary plant consisted of three 2-cubic yard and 
four i-cubicyard mixers; the latter discharging direct- 
ly into forms. Locomotive cranes and derricks, 
averaging 3.8 units a day, were used in placing. 

Miraflores Locks — The final berm crane was 
erected, and began placing concrete during 
the latter part of the month. Dry excavation 
was continued in the lower lock, eight steam 
shovels being employed. The backfilling of 
the east and west walls, also filling on east and 
west toes of the west dam were continued. 
Work was continued on the construction of 
concrete caisson shells for foundation piers of 
the north center guide wall, and the sinking 
of the first three caissons was begun during 
the month. During the month the amount of 
iron placed aggregated 1,013,506 pounds. 

concrete work — The total amount of 
concrete and large stone laid at Miraflores 
was 60,873 cubic yards, as compared with 
56,083 cubic yards during September. The 
concrete was placed as follows: 453 cubic 
yards in the north center wall; 9,279 cubic 
yards in the east wall; 34,608 cubic yards 
in the center wall; 13,551 cubic yards in the 
west wall; and 2,982 cubic yards in the floors. 

OPERATION OF THE PERMANENT AND AUXILIARY CON- 
CRETE CONSTRUCTION PLANTS AT MIRAFLORES. 



Permanent Auxiliary 
Plant. Plant. 



Length of working day (hours) . . 

Average number of hours per 
day worked laying concrete 
and large stone (actual work- 
ing time) 

Average number of mixers per 
day 



Average hourly output per mixer 
(actual working time) 

Average amount of concrete and 
large stone laid per hour, per 
berm, or chamber crane (actu- 
al working time) 



Large stone laid . 
Concrete laid . . . 



Total concrete laid . . 



.00 



6.36 



6.65 

Cu. Yds. 



6.44 



5.85 
Cu. Yds. 



49,821.00 11,052.00 



49.821.00 11.052 00 



Permanent plant consisted of three berm and two 
chamber cranes. 

Auxiliary plant consisted of two 2-cubic yard mixers, 
and j-cubic yard mixers averaging 3.85 a day; also 
locomotive cranes, placing, averaging .73 per day. 
DISTRICT NO. 2 — DREDGING. 

The following is a statement of the output 
of the five dredges which were in operation 
during the month, and the amount of ma- 
terial excavated hydraulically: 





Type. 


Work. 


PLANT. 


Total. 


Remarks. 


Dredge. 


Earth. 


Rock. 


Earth. 


Rock. 




Dipper 

Ladder... . 
Ladder 

l.inl'U'l . 

Suction — 


Cu. Vds. 

2,452 
4,669 

41.341 
2.950 

209 '1 


Cu. Yds. 

21.120 
6,889 


Cu. yds. 


Cu. Yds, 


Cu. Yds. 

23,572 
11.758 
41,311 
19.950 
209,244 


















Scow measurement 




17,000 














Scow measurement 




260,856 
•52.5UO 


45.009 






305.865 
52,500 






















313.356 


45.009 




358 365 













Chame Sand Excavation — Approximately 
45,534 cubic yards of sand were excavated 
at Punta Chame and delivered at Baboa. 

DISTRICT NO. 3 — MUNICIPAL AND SANITARY 
ENGINEERING. 

The reservoirs, water mains, sewers, roads 
and oil pipe lines were maintained and ex- 
tended as required to facilitate construction 
work. 

Work was resumed on the Panama street 
improvements. 

DISTRICT NO. 4 — ANCON QUARRY. 
PERFORMANCE OF ROCK CRUSHER PLANT. 

Length of working day (hours) 8 . 00 

Average number of hours per day (actual 

working time) 7,10 

Average number of cubic yards crushed per 

hour of working day 334. 50 

Average number of cubic yards crushed per 

working hour 376.90 

Total output for the month, cubic yards.. . 69,582.00 

(Includes 5,136 cubic yards omitted in September.) 
Relocation of Panama Railroad. 
During the month 375,810 cubic yards of 
material were excavated, increasing the total 
excavation at the close of the month to 8,- 
954,038 cubic yards, and 409,145 cubic yards 
of material were placed in embankment, 
increasing the total for this purpose to 14,- 
811,317 cubic yards. 

The average daily number of steamshovels 
at work was 10.38, and the total number of 
working days was 26. 

For comparison with the work done by 
steamshovels during the preceding month, 
and the corresponding month of the previous 
year, the following table has been prepared: 



Period. 


Excava- 
ted by 
shovels. 


Classification of 
material. 


to 

o"Jii 

A o 

> U) ^ 


ca 

— 

? 

26 

25 
26 


•2JU 




Rock. 


Earth. 




1910: 
Oct. . . . 

1911: 
Sept.... 


Cu. Yds. 

238.349 

343,770 
367.085 


Cu. Yds. 
116,608 

186.155 
229,865 


Cu.Yds. 

121,741 

157,615 
137,220 


6.00 

9,44 
10.38 


C. Y. 

1,528 

1,457 
1.360 



♦Excavated from Canal prism, south of Miraflores lock site. 



No temporary trestle was driven during the 
month. Work on bridges and culverts was 
continued. No permanent track was laid 
during the month, the amount of 70-pound 
and 90-pound track remaining at 134,600 
and 42,043 linear feet respectively. The force 
averaged 2,406 men. 

Quartermaster's Department. 
LABOR. 

No contract laborers were received during 
the month. A large number of Spaniards 
came over on their own account, over 400 
arriving on one steamer of the French line. 
Of this number, over 1 75 were assigned to the 
work, some of the remainder returning to 
Europe. 

QUARTERS. 

Laborers' quarters at Miraflores were com- 
pletely filled, and additional barracks were 
opened at Corozal to relieve the congestion. 

The San Pablo district has been vacated, 
there remaining but one family in I. C. C. 
quarters. 

Sixty-five buildings were advertised for 
sale in the Tabernilla-San Pablo-Bohio dis- 
trict, of which 47 were sold, the total amount 
realized being $3,052.75. Forty-three build- 
ings remain unsold in the lake area. 

The 10th Infantry arrived on October 5, 
and is occupying quarters at Camp E. S. Otis, 
in t lie Las ( 'ascadas district. 

BUILDINGS. 

The bathroom addition to the Hotel Tivoli 
was completed, and work on the new wing is 
under way. 



November 22. 1911 



THE CANAL RECORD 



101 



Work was commenced on the caretaker's 
house at lir.izi is Brook. This is to be a con- 
crete house of the No. 17 type, and is intended 
a- permanent quarters. 

MATERIAL AND si el'l [ES. 

The value of material received from the 
United States during the month was SS52,- 
825.91, as compared with $581 ,348.64 during 
September, 1911. Supplies during the month 
were delivered bj 36 steamers, the total 
weight ol regating 32,425 tons, cx- 

clusiveof 889,882 feet B. M. Douglas fir lum- 
ber, 1.206,721 feet B. M. \cIlow pine lumber, 
55,494 feet B. M. while oak lumber, 3,004 
pieces of piling, and 2.700 cross ties. 

Subsistence Department. 

The operation of the European laborers' 
messes, the C( ilored laborers' kitchens and the 
line hotel- showed a net profit of $3,707.58. 
The operation of the Hotel Tivoli showed a 
net profit ol $1,722.41, and there was a net 
profit on restaurants, penitentiary, tugs and 
dredges ol $103.28. The net profit on sub- 
sistence operation- was $5,533.27 

Department of Civil Administration. 
COL UTs. 

During the month lo civil and 61 criminal 
eaves were disposed of in the Circuit Courts, 
and SI civil and 645 criminal eases in the 
District Courts. 

DIVISION OF POSTS, ( I STOMS, AND REVENUES. 

Money order .-ales lor October amounted to 
S41 7,589.83, and the fees to $1,893.18. Re- 
ceipts from stamp and card sales, and news- 
paper postage aggregated $6,517.10. The 
total collection of revenues made by the divi- 
sion was $14,418.94, and the collection on 
account of court fines costs and fees, 
$3,499.12. 

Thirty-one vessels entered at and 28 ves- 
-els cleared from the port of Ancon; and 17 
vessels entered at and 16 vessels cleared from 
the port of Cristobal. 

DIVISION OF POLICE AND PRISONS. 

The total number of persons arrested was 
o2'>, of whom 592 were men and 37 women. 
Twenty-five nations, or 47 separate states 
and dependencies, were represented. The 
total number of arrests for the month was an 
increase of 37 as compared with month of 
September. Sixteen convicts were committed 
to the penitentiary', and 13 were discharged, 
leaving 136 in confinement at the close of the 
month. The cost of guarding and subsisting 
the convicts was $2,738.45, and the value of 
their work on Canal Zone roads $2,042.30. 

DIVISION OF FIRE PROTECTION. 
Seven fires were reported in the Canal Zone 
during the month, as compared with 12 in 
September. The damage to Commission 
property was $2.00. 

DIVISION OF PLBLIC WORKS. 

In the city of Panama the average daily 
consumption of water was 1,369, 911 gallons, 
and in Colon 957,830 gallons. 

The usual inspection and maintenance 
work of this division was performed during 
the month. 

DIVISION OF S( H - 

The schools were reopened on October 2. 
A new white school was opened at Las Cas- 

IS, with an enrollment of 33 pupil-. The 

white school at Tabernilla was discontinued, 

on account of canal operation-, and the 
children from that district were sent lo the 
Gatun school. New colored schools were 
opened at Mirarlorcs, Cucaracha, Mandingo 
and Marajal, and colored schools were 
abolished at Balboa, San Pablo, Tabernilla. 



Bohio, 1'laya de Flor and Las Cascadas. The 
total enrollment in the white schools during 
the month was 1,174, and the average daily 

attendance 972.7, or S3 per cent of the enroll- 
ment; and in the colored schools the total 

enrollment was 931, and averagi dailyatt :nd 
ance 568, or 61 per cent. Forts -three white 
and 24 colored teachers were employed in the 
division on ( Ictober 31. 

Department of Sanitation. 
The total number of deaths from all - 
among employes was 46. These were divided 
as f